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John Milius

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NEWS
September 28, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This tale begins simply, with a T-shirt. A logo adorned its breast, a red diamond with a grizzly bear at the center. Director John Milius had the shirt made as a prop for the fictional surf shop in his 1978 film "Big Wednesday." The movie flopped. So this tale might have ended quietly. But a handful of entrepreneurs saw that little red diamond and began reproducing it--without permission--on shirts and surfboards that were advertised in the back of surfing magazines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2001 | Patrick Goldstein
There's a vintage photo on the wall at John Milius' Warner Bros. offices that belongs in a Hollywood history book. Taken in the late 1970s, it shows the young Milius on the MGM lot with two nerdy young buddies, both intently eyeing a script in Milius' hands. On Milius' right, wearing a plaid shirt and frumpy jeans, is George Lucas, who was Milius' classmate at USC film school in the '60s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1991 | KEVIN BRASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If "Flight of the Intruder" comes across as a recruiting poster for the U.S. Navy, "so much the better," director John Milius says. "I'm never skeptical of the military, but I'm always skeptical of government," he said. "The military is the last vestige of society that has honor and loyalty, where 'uncommon valor' is not a phrase referring to Hollywood."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | Leonard Klady
Film maker John Milius--who says, "Surfing's done a lot for me"--is giving something back in the form of a $400,000 documentary, "Men Who Ride Mountains," financed by surfing manufacturers. "It's about big wave riders who've traditionally taken second place to high-performance, small wave guys," Milius told us. "They're not into competition in a traditional sense. It's them against the ocean."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
Regarding "1,334 Pages Too Much? Mailer's CIA Novel Is Coppola's Movie by Milius" (Film Clips, Dec. 15): We'd like to clarify the reference to John Milius' current Texas Ranger project for Columbia, which makes no mention of the source material or the original writers. Three years ago, Frank Price optioned a story idea from us called "Ranger," based on the book "A Texas Ranger" by N. A. Jennings. Price hired us to adapt the book, which we did. A year later, our agents were told that Milius had been attached to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Like many movie makers preoccupied with heroism, John Milius seems to have both a little boy and a wild tiger clawing each other within his breast. And sometimes they run after each other with such savage persistence that one or both are churned into butter. "Farewell to the King" (selected theaters) should have been a major Milius film, maybe even a great one.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | Pat H. Broeske and John M. Wilson
Memories are made of these from this year: Of the 15 babies hired to play the quints in "Raising Arizona," one was fired. The offense: learning to walk during filming. "No Way Out" producer Mace Neufeld let us peek at rejections his project had garnered on the path to production. From one film financier came: "After having this for a couple of months, I just found it in my lower right-hand drawer."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Francis Coppola thinks big. So it's hardly a shock to hear that Hollywood's high-wire film maker has bought the rights to Norman Mailer's 1,334-page novel, "Harlot's Ghost," a complex, left-wing conspiracy spy thriller about the CIA. What does come as a surprise is that to write the screenplay adaptation, Coppola has chosen a bona fide right-wing conspiracy theorist--John Milius.
NEWS
September 28, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This tale begins simply, with a T-shirt. A logo adorned its breast, a red diamond with a grizzly bear at the center. Director John Milius had the shirt made as a prop for the fictional surf shop in his 1978 film "Big Wednesday." The movie flopped. So this tale might have ended quietly. But a handful of entrepreneurs saw that little red diamond and began reproducing it--without permission--on shirts and surfboards that were advertised in the back of surfing magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
Regarding "1,334 Pages Too Much? Mailer's CIA Novel Is Coppola's Movie by Milius" (Film Clips, Dec. 15): We'd like to clarify the reference to John Milius' current Texas Ranger project for Columbia, which makes no mention of the source material or the original writers. Three years ago, Frank Price optioned a story idea from us called "Ranger," based on the book "A Texas Ranger" by N. A. Jennings. Price hired us to adapt the book, which we did. A year later, our agents were told that Milius had been attached to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Francis Coppola thinks big. So it's hardly a shock to hear that Hollywood's high-wire film maker has bought the rights to Norman Mailer's 1,334-page novel, "Harlot's Ghost," a complex, left-wing conspiracy spy thriller about the CIA. What does come as a surprise is that to write the screenplay adaptation, Coppola has chosen a bona fide right-wing conspiracy theorist--John Milius.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1991 | KEVIN BRASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If "Flight of the Intruder" comes across as a recruiting poster for the U.S. Navy, "so much the better," director John Milius says. "I'm never skeptical of the military, but I'm always skeptical of government," he said. "The military is the last vestige of society that has honor and loyalty, where 'uncommon valor' is not a phrase referring to Hollywood."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Like many movie makers preoccupied with heroism, John Milius seems to have both a little boy and a wild tiger clawing each other within his breast. And sometimes they run after each other with such savage persistence that one or both are churned into butter. "Farewell to the King" (selected theaters) should have been a major Milius film, maybe even a great one.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | Leonard Klady
Film maker John Milius--who says, "Surfing's done a lot for me"--is giving something back in the form of a $400,000 documentary, "Men Who Ride Mountains," financed by surfing manufacturers. "It's about big wave riders who've traditionally taken second place to high-performance, small wave guys," Milius told us. "They're not into competition in a traditional sense. It's them against the ocean."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2001 | Patrick Goldstein
There's a vintage photo on the wall at John Milius' Warner Bros. offices that belongs in a Hollywood history book. Taken in the late 1970s, it shows the young Milius on the MGM lot with two nerdy young buddies, both intently eyeing a script in Milius' hands. On Milius' right, wearing a plaid shirt and frumpy jeans, is George Lucas, who was Milius' classmate at USC film school in the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986
"It's an action-detective story with a female slant. It's been referred to as a female 'Dirty Harry.' " That's how a rep for John Milius described "Fatal Beauty," which Milius is currently scripting and will direct for MGM. No deal has been cinched, but Cher (now at work on "The Witches of Eastwick") is the hoped-for star.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | Pat H. Broeske and John M. Wilson
Memories are made of these from this year: Of the 15 babies hired to play the quints in "Raising Arizona," one was fired. The offense: learning to walk during filming. "No Way Out" producer Mace Neufeld let us peek at rejections his project had garnered on the path to production. From one film financier came: "After having this for a couple of months, I just found it in my lower right-hand drawer."
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