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NEWS
November 10, 1988 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John N. Mitchell, the only attorney general in the nation's history ever to serve a prison sentence, died Wednesday night of a heart attack, a hospital official said. He was 75. Claudia Dominitz, a spokeswoman for George Washington University Hospital, said Mitchell died at 6:27 p.m. Mitchell was apparently on the way to his home in the fashionable Georgetown section of Washington when he collapsed on the sidewalk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
The Partisan The Life of William Rehnquist John A. Jenkins Public Affairs: 368 pp., $28.99 Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist was a curious man. He could be courtly and gracious, elegant in argument and a brilliant advocate. He also was a ferocious adversary, a relentless conservative and, as John A. Jenkins makes clear in his new biography, a determined partisan. One sample of his paradox: Rehnquist was a respected leader of the court, appreciated even by those whose politics he abhorred, and yet he secured his position in part by perjuring himself at his confirmation hearing.
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BOOKS
March 6, 1988 | Kevin O'Toole, O'Toole is a free-lance writer and commercial fisherman. He lives with his wife and two children in their log cabin home on Sheep Mountain, Alaska. and
Exile in Alaska: The phrase conjures images of frozen wastes, the long dark and solitude of the far north. In these seven stories, however, exile refers to a subtle force that is pervasive in the lives of many who choose the last frontier, a force by which each is measured and sorted. This is John Mitchell's second book of stories from the fishing grounds and homesteads of the 49th state. The Alaska he chronicles is primarily one of people rather than wilderness.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
The gig(s): John Paul DeJoria, 67, is co-founder and chief executive of Beverly Hills-based John Paul Mitchell Systems, a 32-year-old hair-care products line that is sold in 87 countries and logs nearly $1 billion in annual sales. The brand includes 110 Paul Mitchell schools in the U.S. DeJoria is also co-founder of the Patron Spirits Co. line of tequilas and holds interests in several other ventures. Unglamorous beginnings: "I grew up in East L.A. I didn't think it was a bad place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1985
Anent your editorial, it is beginning to look as though earlier hesitancies to confirm the appoinment of Edwin Meese III as attorney general may have been justified after all. His decision not to proceed with individual prosecutions in the E.F. Hutton scandal has to raise questions as to his judgment and, perhaps, his motives. America doen't need another John Mitchell. SODESHITA KANEZO Gardena
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1989 | Shauna Snow, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Television movies aren't the only media reviving Watergate these days. "The Unguided Missile," a David Wolpe play about President Nixon's attorney general, John Mitchell, and his flamboyant wife, Martha, opened Sunday at New York's Off-Broadway's American Place Theater. The play rehashes Mitchell's refusal to testify against his President when the Watergate scandal exploded, and his wife's subsequent exposure of the cover-up.
SPORTS
June 3, 1995 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Mitchell called it the best feeling he's experienced in sports. When Cal State Fullerton clinched the NCAA South Regional baseball championship last week, Mitchell knew he was about to fulfill a dream by participating in the College World Series. "Nothing compares to that," said Mitchell, a junior right-hander from Rio Mesa High. "I've never felt the way I did that day." Happiness on the baseball field has been spotty for Mitchell, who is 3-0 with a 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
The Partisan The Life of William Rehnquist John A. Jenkins Public Affairs: 368 pp., $28.99 Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist was a curious man. He could be courtly and gracious, elegant in argument and a brilliant advocate. He also was a ferocious adversary, a relentless conservative and, as John A. Jenkins makes clear in his new biography, a determined partisan. One sample of his paradox: Rehnquist was a respected leader of the court, appreciated even by those whose politics he abhorred, and yet he secured his position in part by perjuring himself at his confirmation hearing.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
John G. Mitchell, a retired environment editor for National Geographic magazine who also had been editor of Sierra Club Books and a longtime field editor and writer for Audubon magazine, has died. He was 75. Mitchell died July 7 in Albany, N.Y., after a heart attack. He was returning to his home in Old Lyme, Conn., from the High Peaks region of the Adirondacks, where he had been visiting a family cottage.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On the set of his first movie, "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," future "Rabbit Hole" director John Cameron Mitchell was decked out in drag ? and running around the set barking orders at Teamsters. His father, then an Army major general, was visiting the set that day. "He told me, 'Oh, you're doing what I do,'" recalls Mitchell. On most sets, that's the truth: A director's vision may be one thing, but how he or she achieves it through managing cast, crew and a thousand other tiny details is another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
John F. Mitchell, 81, who helped engineer the technology that paved the way for the world's first cellular phone during a 45-year career at Motorola, where he was president from 1980 to 1995, died of cancer June 11 at a hospice in Palatine, Ill., said his son Kevin. As chief engineer for mobile and portable products at Schaumburg, Ill.-based Motorola, Mitchell helped develop the first design for a portable and consumer-friendly cellular telephone system. Motorola's DynaTAC, a radio and telephone cellular system, came out in 1973 and became the basis for the company's first commercial hand-held cellphone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2007 | Patricia Sullivan, Washington Post
John G. Mitchell, a retired environment editor for National Geographic magazine who also had been editor of Sierra Club Books and a longtime field editor and writer for Audubon magazine, has died. He was 75. Mitchell died July 7 in Albany, N.Y., after a heart attack. He was returning to his home in Old Lyme, Conn., from the High Peaks region of the Adirondacks, where he had been visiting a family cottage.
BOOKS
March 4, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, susan.reynolds@latimes.com
BACK in 1962, John Hanson Mitchell was a 20-year-old student at the Sorbonne in Paris, but his real education and that of his friends "took place in cafes ... where we gathered each day to argue over literature, art and politics as if we knew what we were talking about." Of his aspirations, he explains with a certain humility that "[l]ike many young Americans in Paris in that era, I had in mind that I would somehow be miraculously transformed into a writer in Europe."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dislocation was a constant in the formative years of John Cameron Mitchell. As an Army brat--he was the son of a general--he moved repeatedly in the U.S. and Europe. Add to that a deep-seated sense he had since childhood of being different from those around him, of being a freak.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the screen, the rip-roaring rock musical "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" retains all the excitement and energy it had on stage while adding depth, clarity and emotional texture. The result is a movie that absorbs its theatricality so smoothly and imaginatively that it never feels merely like a stage adaptation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
John F. Mitchell, 81, who helped engineer the technology that paved the way for the world's first cellular phone during a 45-year career at Motorola, where he was president from 1980 to 1995, died of cancer June 11 at a hospice in Palatine, Ill., said his son Kevin. As chief engineer for mobile and portable products at Schaumburg, Ill.-based Motorola, Mitchell helped develop the first design for a portable and consumer-friendly cellular telephone system. Motorola's DynaTAC, a radio and telephone cellular system, came out in 1973 and became the basis for the company's first commercial hand-held cellphone.
NEWS
January 21, 1988
John H. Mitchell, one of the first three employees of Screen Gems productions, forerunner of Columbia Pictures Television, died Tuesday of a heart attack at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 66. Mitchell was a three-term president of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and Columbia's TV president from 1968 to 1977. During his tenure more than 100 television series and 50 TV movies or mini-series were produced for all the major networks.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard G. Kleindienst, who served as attorney general for 10 months in the Nixon administration during much of the Watergate investigation, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Arizona. He was 76. Kleindienst, a blunt, law-and-order conservative, assumed the top post at the Justice Department after serving as deputy to John N. Mitchell, a fierce Nixon loyalist who had resigned as attorney general to run Nixon's 1972 reelection campaign.
SPORTS
June 3, 1995 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Mitchell called it the best feeling he's experienced in sports. When Cal State Fullerton clinched the NCAA South Regional baseball championship last week, Mitchell knew he was about to fulfill a dream by participating in the College World Series. "Nothing compares to that," said Mitchell, a junior right-hander from Rio Mesa High. "I've never felt the way I did that day." Happiness on the baseball field has been spotty for Mitchell, who is 3-0 with a 5.
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