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John Molinari

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John B. Molinari, 94, a former justice of the state Court of Appeal, died Monday after a brief illness at his home in San Francisco. The cause of death was not announced. A native of San Francisco, Molinari graduated from the University of San Francisco and earned his law degree there. He practiced law in the city's North Beach area and served as a deputy district attorney during World War II. He was appointed a Municipal Court judge in 1947 by Gov. Earl Warren.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John B. Molinari, 94, a former justice of the state Court of Appeal, died Monday after a brief illness at his home in San Francisco. The cause of death was not announced. A native of San Francisco, Molinari graduated from the University of San Francisco and earned his law degree there. He practiced law in the city's North Beach area and served as a deputy district attorney during World War II. He was appointed a Municipal Court judge in 1947 by Gov. Earl Warren.
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NEWS
November 30, 1987
The two candidates running for mayor of San Francisco have made this year's election the most expensive in the city's history, spending more than $3 million between them. Assemblyman Art Agnos and Supervisor John Molinari have received contributions totaling $3,048,367 thus far and have spent $3,014,449, according to campaign finance records. The two candidates are involved in a Dec. 8 runoff after Molinari placed a distant second to Agnos in the Nov. 3 primary to succeed Mayor Dianne Feinstein.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Art Agnos fashioned a commanding plurality in San Francisco's mayoral primary last month by promising many things to many people, from families pinched by housing costs to preservationists worried over the loss of quaint architecture.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Art Agnos fashioned a commanding plurality in San Francisco's mayoral primary last month by promising many things to many people, from families pinched by housing costs to preservationists worried over the loss of quaint architecture.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | LINDSEY TANNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They still don't know how it happened. A decade ago, Kimberly Bergalis stepped forward to announce that she had AIDS. The pretty Floridian had none of the known risk factors for the disease; she had not had sex, she did not share needles, she had not had blood transfusions. But she had gone to a dentist to have two teeth pulled, and somehow he gave her AIDS.
NEWS
December 10, 1987
Assemblyman Art Agnos, a former social worker whose Populist mayoral campaign overcame long odds, vowed to be an unorthodox mayor after his resounding victory over a San Francisco City Hall insider. The 49-year-old Democratic state legislator and self-described liberal climaxed a savvy eight-month campaign by defeating John Molinari, president of the Board of Supervisors, with 70% percent of the vote.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | United Press International
Because of divided public opinion on the matter, San Francisco supervisor and mayoral candidate John Molinari has withdrawn his proposal to close Lombard Street, the most crooked street in the world, to automobile traffic. Instead, Molinari said he has asked Mayor Dianne Feinstein and the San Francisco budget analyst to study the cost of having a police officer control traffic at the corner of Lombard and Hyde streets during the summer months.
NEWS
December 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Supervisor Bill Maher was struck in the eye while restraining a man who leaped over the chamber railing at the start of Monday's board meeting. The man, who shouted obscenities and knocked over a model of a proposed addition to the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, was identified by police as Donald Lee Nieto, 44, of San Francisco. Officer Don Schneider said Nieto was booked on charges of assaulting a public officer, disrupting a public meeting and battery. No bail has yet been set.
NEWS
November 30, 1987
The two candidates running for mayor of San Francisco have made this year's election the most expensive in the city's history, spending more than $3 million between them. Assemblyman Art Agnos and Supervisor John Molinari have received contributions totaling $3,048,367 thus far and have spent $3,014,449, according to campaign finance records. The two candidates are involved in a Dec. 8 runoff after Molinari placed a distant second to Agnos in the Nov. 3 primary to succeed Mayor Dianne Feinstein.
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