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John Moore

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John L. Moore, a leukemia patient who lost a historic property rights battle in which he claimed he deserved to share in the profits from an anti-cancer drug derived from cells taken from his spleen, has died. He was 56. Moore died in a Seattle hospital Oct. 1 after undergoing an experimental treatment for his disease. Moore, who spent a decade campaigning for patients' rights, was near death in 1976 when diagnosed with hairy cell leukemia, a rare and potentially fatal form of cancer.
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SPORTS
March 31, 2013 | BILL PLASCHKE
Her final pep talk wasn't a pep talk at all. Kirsten Moore was beyond pep. Her final pep talk, given while surrounded by her Westmont College women's basketball team before the NAIA national championship game, was her chance to say thanks. Moore thanked her team for keeping her soul alive. She thanked them for sitting in the third row for her husband's funeral, for playing with her infant daughter in the third row of the team bus, for sharing her pain and embellishing her joy. She thanked them for their patience when she was weeping at an unseen memory, or staring blankly into an uncertain future, or disappearing just before tipoffs to nurse her child.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Peter Moore, 86, a close aide to Salvador Dali who was convicted of tampering with one of the surrealist master's paintings, died Monday in Port Lligat, Spain. No cause of death was announced. A British army captain in World War II, Moore became Dali's assistant after meeting him in Italy in the 1950s. He accompanied Dali on many of his world tours during his 20 years as a personal assistant. When Dali became ill and bedridden, Moore's influence over the artist's activities increased.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2008 | Patrick Kevin Day
For the feature film version of "Max Payne," director John Moore wanted to explicitly depict the shadowy drug-induced visions of the winged Valkyries that the video game only hinted at. But the visual effects crew, led by supervisor Everett Burrell, had to stay nimble when, three weeks before shooting, the director decided to add live-action Valkyries to the previously planned all-CGI effects. "We had a Czechoslovakian dancer named Mako Hindy on set as a reference" for the actors, Burrell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1986
Scheer's poignant and hopeful look at New York schools offers the clearest vision of what this country is all about. Kudos to him and to The Times. JOHN MOORE Claremont
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1985
A 92-year-old Carlsbad man was struck and killed by a garbage truck Wednesday as it backed out of a driveway onto the private road where he was walking. John Moore was walking near his home when he was struck about 10:30 a.m. Moore was pronounced dead at the scene. According to the San Diego County coroner's report, the victim was deaf and may not have heard the truck's backup signal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2008 | Patrick Kevin Day
For the feature film version of "Max Payne," director John Moore wanted to explicitly depict the shadowy drug-induced visions of the winged Valkyries that the video game only hinted at. But the visual effects crew, led by supervisor Everett Burrell, had to stay nimble when, three weeks before shooting, the director decided to add live-action Valkyries to the previously planned all-CGI effects. "We had a Czechoslovakian dancer named Mako Hindy on set as a reference" for the actors, Burrell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1988 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
A patient's blood and tissues are his personal property, and he may have a right to share profits on commercial products genetically engineered from them, a state Court of Appeal ruled Thursday in an unprecedented case. It was the first time that a court has ruled that a person has a "property interest" in his blood and tissues. Those items are not listed in the California laws defining property.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court, hearing a pivotal case from the emerging field of biotechnology, was asked Tuesday to grant medical patients a broad new right to share in profits from the commercial use of their bodily tissues. The lawyer for a leukemia survivor whose cancerous spleen was removed and used in research urged the justices to open the way for a landmark lawsuit that pits a patient's claim over surgically removed organs against the asserted interests of scientific research.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez
IT takes a daring soul to risk the curse of the horror remake and the Curse of "The Omen" in one creepy project. But director John Moore felt it was his solemn duty to warn moviegoers that Damien, that devilish 5-year-old boy, is once again on his way. Moore began his career shooting the news and working as an assistant cameraman for Oscar-nominated directors Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Peter Moore, 86, a close aide to Salvador Dali who was convicted of tampering with one of the surrealist master's paintings, died Monday in Port Lligat, Spain. No cause of death was announced. A British army captain in World War II, Moore became Dali's assistant after meeting him in Italy in the 1950s. He accompanied Dali on many of his world tours during his 20 years as a personal assistant. When Dali became ill and bedridden, Moore's influence over the artist's activities increased.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2002 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Peregrine Systems Inc. ousted its top management amid an accounting scandal in May, the San Diego software company turned to the man who built it from a tiny firm to a $13-billion enterprise: John J. Moores. The multimillionaire owner of the San Diego Padres baseball team seemed like a natural choice. A self-described computer nerd, he had served on the board for 13 years, including a decade-long stint as chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2001 | GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warfare in one form or another has always been a part of John Moore's life. He grew up in Dundalk, Ireland, the hardscrabble border town long known as a hide-out for the Irish Republican Army where car bombs killed a few of his relatives and bloody riots were commonplace. As a news cameraman years later, Moore braved Israeli shelling while covering the peacekeeping mission in south Lebanon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John L. Moore, a leukemia patient who lost a historic property rights battle in which he claimed he deserved to share in the profits from an anti-cancer drug derived from cells taken from his spleen, has died. He was 56. Moore died in a Seattle hospital Oct. 1 after undergoing an experimental treatment for his disease. Moore, who spent a decade campaigning for patients' rights, was near death in 1976 when diagnosed with hairy cell leukemia, a rare and potentially fatal form of cancer.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another sign that the city has hit the "philanthropic big leagues," Padres baseball team majority owner John Moores and his wife have donated $20 million toward construction of a cancer research facility at UC San Diego, officials announced Thursday. The facility, to be named after John and Rebecca Moores, will provide clinical and research space for more than 300 physicians, scientists and others now employed by the UC San Diego Cancer Center.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand the ruling of a California court that a hospital patient does not own rights to tissues taken from his body, even if they prove immensely valuable to scientists. The high court action ends a financial threat to the burgeoning field of biotechnology. By genetically altering human cells, medical researchers have been able to produce new treatments for a variety of ailments including cancer, diabetes, hepatitis and ulcers.
SPORTS
March 31, 2013 | BILL PLASCHKE
Her final pep talk wasn't a pep talk at all. Kirsten Moore was beyond pep. Her final pep talk, given while surrounded by her Westmont College women's basketball team before the NAIA national championship game, was her chance to say thanks. Moore thanked her team for keeping her soul alive. She thanked them for sitting in the third row for her husband's funeral, for playing with her infant daughter in the third row of the team bus, for sharing her pain and embellishing her joy. She thanked them for their patience when she was weeping at an unseen memory, or staring blankly into an uncertain future, or disappearing just before tipoffs to nurse her child.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of the San Diego Padres baseball franchise was among those who hired Webster L. Hubbell after he resigned his high-ranking Justice Department position three years ago. Like others who hired Hubbell, John J. Moores, the Padres owner, acknowledged that he had demanded and received little work for the money he sent Hubbell, who had resigned amid allegations of impropriety.
SPORTS
May 26, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a self-described computer nerd who has turned software into an impressive collection of hardware. John Moores, formerly of Houston and now of San Diego, is said to be worth more than $400 million, but he hasn't forgotten humble roots. His success in computers and real estate has been accompanied by wide-ranging philanthropy. He even contributed an estimated $80 million to rescue a charity case known as the San Diego Padres from the fire sale regime of Tom Werner and partners.
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