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John Muir

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SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists announced Tuesday they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is now a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists recently announced that they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
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OPINION
April 26, 2009
Re "On Earth Day, think Thoreau," Opinion, April 22 On Earth Day, we ought to remember John Muir as well as Henry David Thoreau, and not allow ourselves to be misled by false issues of local versus federal government. Thoreau was more concerned with limiting government, both local and federal, than he was with making use of its power. Muir, like Thoreau, spent much time in the woods; unlike Thoreau, however, he took his love of the forests, mountains and meadows to Washington and persuaded Theodore Roosevelt to camp with him in the Sierra.
SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Horticulturists announced Tuesday they had successfully cloned a genetic replica of an ailing 130-year-old giant sequoia planted by conservationist John Muir in the 1880s on his ranch in Martinez, Calif. And many more are apparently on the way, they say. If all goes according to plan, the first clone nurtured in a Michigan laboratory will be shipped within a year to California for planting at Muir's homestead, which is now a national historic site about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, said David Milarch, cofounder of the nonprofit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.
OPINION
August 15, 2012
Hetch Hetchy Valley reached a high of 99 degrees when I visited recently. But even on a blistering day, the lesser-known great valley of Yosemite National Park was a beautiful place. Brilliant wildflowers, shady glens, Wapama Falls cascading 1,300 feet and casting a cooling mist over the wooden bridges - and me - below. Opposite the falls, imposing Kolana Rock was mirrored perfectly in the still, blue water of the reservoir. That reservoir, which covers the valley's bottom 300-plus feet, has been wildly controversial since well before it was built.
TRAVEL
January 18, 1998 | JOHN McKINNEY
Most of us picture John Muir in one of two ways: as a young man exploring the High Sierra and the wonders of Yosemite or as America's revered elder naturalist, author and Sierra Club founder. We don't often think of Muir in his middle years--the 1880s and 1890s--a time of great creativity for him as well as happiness, when he married, raised two daughters and managed a fruit ranch on the outskirts of Martinez, Calif., which is about 25 miles north of Oakland.
NEWS
October 20, 1991
Friday through Sunday John Muir High School in Pasadena and Occidental College in Eagle Rock will co-host a conference for educators titled "Teaching the Holocaust to New Generations." Sponsored by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the conference will introduce the resources and services available through the museum's education outreach department. Day sessions, not open to the public, are at Muir. Evening sessions will be held at Occidental College and will be open to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In making "Looking for John Muir" with England's Channel Four, writer-explorer-host Robert Perkins set out a very basic task for himself: Retrace naturalist Muir's 1867 Louisville, Ky.-to-northern Florida walk, and find out why the journey turned him into America's first great radical ecologist and the father of the national park system.
MAGAZINE
March 19, 2006
Stunning is the only word to describe Richard Long's photo and the accompanying text ("Donner Pass Circle," by Colin Westerbeck, Photo Synthesis, March 5). Responsible visitors to the backcountry observe and promote an outdoor ethic that emphasizes minimizing the impact of human visitation. Long's defacing of remote places to indulge his personal sense of the artistic is bad enough, but leaving such scars "for the weather or other walkers to undo" is unconscionable. How different are Long's actions from those of another self-described "artist" who would leave, in the form of graffiti, his inspiration "for others to undo" on the walls of a synagogue, mosque or church?
NEWS
January 14, 1986 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, Times Staff Writer
A 22-year-old former student at John Muir High School has been arrested in the double slaying of the school's most popular teacher and a 17-year-old student, Pasadena police said today. Robert Gregg Butler of Azusa was arrested late Monday night at his home and booked into Pasadena City Jail on suspicion of murder in the Dec. 13 shooting deaths of social science teacher Robert Jones, 47, and Ronald McClendon, a junior varsity basketball player at John Muir, Officer Mike Guerin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
MARTINEZ, Calif. - It would be hard to equal John Muir's love for the giant sequoia, a majestic California native that can live 3,000 years and soar 250 feet high. "The King tree & me have sworn eternal love," he wrote to a friend in the fall of 1870, "sworn it without swearing and Ive taken the sacrament with Douglass Squirrels drank Sequoia wine, Sequoia blood, & with its rosy purple drips I am writing this woody gospel letter. " A decade or so later, the besotted conservationist returned from a Sierra Nevada jaunt with a seedling wrapped in a damp handkerchief.
TRAVEL
December 30, 2012 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
Every New Year, Jeremy Evans made a promise to himself. This would be the year the Los Angeles freelance photographer and cinematographer would embark on the trip of a lifetime: a solo, 215-mile trek along the John Muir Trail in California's Sierra Nevada. But each passing year the journey remained on his bucket list. Finally, Evans made the personal and financial choices needed to set aside three weeks to hike the trail that starts in Yosemite National Park and winds through Sequoia National Park and Kings Canyon National Park before ending at Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the Lower 48 states.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Karin Klein
From Texas comes the tale of a 6-foot, 300-pound 12-year-old whose mother is planning to protest the rules of the Pee-Wee Football Assn. because it doesn't allow players' weight to exceed 135 pounds. And she isn't alone. Ellijah Earnhardt's coach is also pushing the association to allow the boy into the game. Of course he is; imagine what a formidable force Elijah would be on the field. Elijah would be allowed to play in school leagues, which allow bigger kids, but those are also generally older players with some experience.
OPINION
August 15, 2012
Hetch Hetchy Valley reached a high of 99 degrees when I visited recently. But even on a blistering day, the lesser-known great valley of Yosemite National Park was a beautiful place. Brilliant wildflowers, shady glens, Wapama Falls cascading 1,300 feet and casting a cooling mist over the wooden bridges - and me - below. Opposite the falls, imposing Kolana Rock was mirrored perfectly in the still, blue water of the reservoir. That reservoir, which covers the valley's bottom 300-plus feet, has been wildly controversial since well before it was built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Locals didn't find the ads, posted at the laundromat or running in the SuperSaver, to be strange at all. A number of people, in fact, reached out to Brian Wallenstein the "researcher looking to gather stories and information" for a book on Bigfoot and UFO sightings. A woman named Rudi emailed to report that she'd seen a bright disc hovering above Mt. Shasta. She attached a photo from a ski resort snow cam that showed a luminous speck. (Credible, Wallenstein thought.) A man named Larry recounted his own research — including telepathic communication with "them" — conducted in preparation for the day extraterrestrials would reveal themselves to earthlings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012 | Louis Sahagun
Gale-force winds were whipping whitecaps and spray across Mono Lake when Robert Hanna spotted a distant hiker. It was a crummy day to chat up a stranger in a state park, but Hanna was upbeat, as usual. He stepped hurriedly along a trail to introduce himself. "Hello there!" Hanna said, flashing a toothy smile. "Do you know that California wants to shut this place down? Would you like to sign our petition to keep it open?" "Yeah, I guess so," the man said. "Wow! That's great," Hanna said, reaching to shake his hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although some people claim to hate history, many more are captivated by it. There are Civil War reenactors, Renaissance reenactors, Wild West reenactors and on and on. Then there are those who portray historical figures, such as Oxnard's Don Ancell, who transforms himself into honest Abe Lincoln. In that spirit, actor Lee Stetson will present a one-man show this weekend in Ojai celebrating the life and times of naturalist John Muir.
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Muir, the father of nature conservation in the United States, has become the focus of a battle over heritage preservation in the coastal town that inspired his love of the wilderness. Fortunately, the "wild places and wild creatures" of Muir's native Dunbar aren't under threat, because a good stretch of the rich coastal land he roamed as a child has been safeguarded in the national John Muir Trust.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2011
TOURISM Presentation Author William D. Chalmers will discuss his new book, "On the Origin of the Species Homo Touristicus," and the state of authentic travel in the age of reality TV. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220 SOUTH AMERICA Slide show Mort Loveman will present "Venezuela: Exploring the Amazon and Orinoco River. " When, where: 1 p.m. Wednesday at Roxbury Park Community Center, 471 S. Roxbury Drive, Beverly Hills Admission, info: $1 for Beverly Hills residents; $2 for others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2011 | By Robert D. Davila, Sacramento Bee
John D. Olmsted, a naturalist who led efforts to preserve Northern California nature areas, open space and trails, died of liver cancer March 8 at his home in Nevada City, Calif. He was 73. Inspired by conservationist John Muir, Olmsted spent more than 40 years pursuing his dream of a trans-California hiking trail ? roughly paralleling Highway 20 ? from Lake Tahoe to the Pacific Ocean. He proposed creating a public-land corridor that would connect a chain of natural landscapes stretching across Northern California.
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