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John Nichols

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BOOKS
July 22, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
AN AMERICAN CHILD SUPREME The Education of a Liberation Ecologist by John Nichols; Milkweed: 197 pp., $14 John Nichols, in case you don't already know him, is the author of 18 books (most famously "The Milagro Beanfield War"), countless essays and stories and several screenplays (most famously "Missing"). He is a Godforsaken mountain of American conflict, spiritual doubt, political duality and gender confusion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
John NICHOLS can't stop writing. He often produces 10, 20, 30 drafts of a book, some more than 1,000 pages long. Nichols saves them all and frequently returns to things he started decades ago. Threads of stories surround the writer like milkweed seeds with their gauzy fibers. His little adobe house in Taos is full of books and other projects. Overflow goes to one of several storage lockers.
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BOOKS
June 28, 1992 | Charles Bowden, Bowden's most recent book is "Desierto: Memories of the Future" (W.W. Norton)
About a year ago, while a bunch of us sipped beer on the porch of a hotel in the Rockies, John Nichols played guitar and dipped into his endless stock of blues songs. He had just delivered a veritable sermon on the ecological consequences of squandering liquid dishwashing soap. He was then, and is today, a man with many opinions, the type of person who gets out of bed every morning ready to fire off a letter to the editor, a kind of amiable nag.
BOOKS
May 18, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
The phrase "island hopping" refers to the grand strategy of the American armed forces in the South Pacific during World War II, but it takes on a whole new meaning in "Santa Catalina Island Goes to War," a charming and illuminating scrapbook of photographs, documents and artifacts from the moment in history when Catalina was suddenly transformed from a tourist destination to a military outpost.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
John NICHOLS can't stop writing. He often produces 10, 20, 30 drafts of a book, some more than 1,000 pages long. Nichols saves them all and frequently returns to things he started decades ago. Threads of stories surround the writer like milkweed seeds with their gauzy fibers. His little adobe house in Taos is full of books and other projects. Overflow goes to one of several storage lockers.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Covina attorney Dan Thomas Oki was appointed Thursday as a judge in the Citrus Municipal Court, canceling his uncontested bid to win election to the vacant post. The first Asian-American appointed to the bench by Gov. Pete Wilson, Oki, 40, replaces Judge John Nichols, who retired in December on disability after being absent from the court for nearly two years.
BOOKS
April 24, 1994 | Ron Carlson, Ron Carlson is the author most recently of the story collection, "Plan B for the Middle Class."
John Nichols' new novel bears the fortunate subtitle, "A Comedy of the Martial Arts" (with a transposition mark in "Martial" between the "t" and the "i"), and this wordplay is a kind of truth in advertising for this novel is a broad marital comedy and it is full of the kind of play and sense of humor that we know is the often the true sense in his work.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first thing Lance noticed was that the paparazzi's flashes weren't popping. He had just arrived at one of those aggressively lavish post-Grammy parties, and Lance, one of two Hollywood Kids who've made it their business to gossip, was up to the occasion. A tiny Wilma Flintstone and an itty-bitty Betty Rubble were pinned to his hat. The words beat boy dashed across his jacket like Chinese calligraphy.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Nichols makes it very plain: He doesn't wish to be remembered for "The Milagro Beanfield War"--the book he has called "an albatross around my neck." Since "Milagro" appeared in 1974, Nichols has written books on the environment, elegant meditations on the damage people inflict on the natural world. He's also done considerable screenwriting, including a rewrite of the Costa-Gavras film "Missing" and drafts of "Milagro."
NEWS
November 1, 1990
Preserving the planet will be the topic of discussion as political activist-author-photographer John Nichols presents his latest book at the Ventura Bookstore Wednesday. "The Sky's the Limit: a Defense of the Earth" is a series of color photographs of an unspoiled mesa near Nichols' home in New Mexico. Nichols will present a slide show of the mesa and speak of its fate and that of the planet.
BOOKS
July 22, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
AN AMERICAN CHILD SUPREME The Education of a Liberation Ecologist by John Nichols; Milkweed: 197 pp., $14 John Nichols, in case you don't already know him, is the author of 18 books (most famously "The Milagro Beanfield War"), countless essays and stories and several screenplays (most famously "Missing"). He is a Godforsaken mountain of American conflict, spiritual doubt, political duality and gender confusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2001
John Philip Nichols, 76, the controversial patriarch of the family that brought the Cabazon Indians into the gambling era. After Nichols became financial advisor in 1978, the tribe launched business ventures including a poker club and bingo hall and the sale of tax-free cigarettes and discount liquor. Under his leadership, the Cabazons established health insurance plans and opportunities in education and employment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Nichols, the noted and devoted photographer-curator-gallery owner, has been collecting and presenting art--usually photography--since 1984 in various addresses in downtown Santa Paula. He has offered a movable oasis of art in a quaint town normally somewhat shy of flaunting its culture. But his latest address is the best yet, with copious floor space for a gallery, books on the second-floor balcony, and a niche for rare books and prints called the "Browsarium."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
A Pacoima man died early Monday after he was ejected from his van when it was hit by another vehicle and tumbled 150 feet down a freeway embankment, authorities said. Pedro Salinas Olea, 63, was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics. His passenger, Patricia Castillo, 21, who was also thrown from the van, was taken to Holy Cross Medical Center where she was in serious condition, a California Highway Patrol spokesman said.
BOOKS
April 24, 1994 | Ron Carlson, Ron Carlson is the author most recently of the story collection, "Plan B for the Middle Class."
John Nichols' new novel bears the fortunate subtitle, "A Comedy of the Martial Arts" (with a transposition mark in "Martial" between the "t" and the "i"), and this wordplay is a kind of truth in advertising for this novel is a broad marital comedy and it is full of the kind of play and sense of humor that we know is the often the true sense in his work.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Nichols makes it very plain: He doesn't wish to be remembered for "The Milagro Beanfield War"--the book he has called "an albatross around my neck." Since "Milagro" appeared in 1974, Nichols has written books on the environment, elegant meditations on the damage people inflict on the natural world. He's also done considerable screenwriting, including a rewrite of the Costa-Gavras film "Missing" and drafts of "Milagro."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
A Pacoima man died early Monday after he was ejected from his van when it was hit by another vehicle and tumbled 150 feet down a freeway embankment, authorities said. Pedro Salinas Olea, 63, was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics. His passenger, Patricia Castillo, 21, who was also thrown from the van, was taken to Holy Cross Medical Center where she was in serious condition, a California Highway Patrol spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Nichols, the noted and devoted photographer-curator-gallery owner, has been collecting and presenting art--usually photography--since 1984 in various addresses in downtown Santa Paula. He has offered a movable oasis of art in a quaint town normally somewhat shy of flaunting its culture. But his latest address is the best yet, with copious floor space for a gallery, books on the second-floor balcony, and a niche for rare books and prints called the "Browsarium."
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The premise was simple. John Nichols wanted to round up a pack of willing artists for an exhibition of art based on the city of Santa Paula. The mixed-media show would be hung in his gallery, a kind of intellectual nucleus in the humble downtown quadrant. What could be more Santa Paulan? But the result reveals as much about the devious and probing ways of artists as it does about the town in question. Anytown U.S.A., indeed.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While the photographs in Michael Moore's Los Padres Project can be striking in their own right, one of the project's valuable side effects is that it gives the Ventura County viewer a solid sense of regional appreciation. The exhibit, now up at John Nichols in Santa Paula, wouldn't play as well elsewhere, so tied is its message to the heart of the area.
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