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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996
Aviation pioneers such as Howard Hughes and John Northrop will be memorialized in Westchester today when Los Angeles city officials unveil a sidewalk monument honoring the aviation manufacturers along with a sculpture of an F-18 fighter jet. The 13-foot steel airplane replica will be the center of the sidewalk monument. A large metal compass and outline of a propeller embedded in the ground will point to plaques of the manufacturers and famous pilots such as Amelia Earhart and Charles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996
Aviation pioneers such as Howard Hughes and John Northrop will be memorialized in Westchester today when Los Angeles city officials unveil a sidewalk monument honoring the aviation manufacturers along with a sculpture of an F-18 fighter jet. The 13-foot steel airplane replica will be the center of the sidewalk monument. A large metal compass and outline of a propeller embedded in the ground will point to plaques of the manufacturers and famous pilots such as Amelia Earhart and Charles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
In the late 1920s, the fledgling Lockheed Aircraft Co. was in horrible financial shape. Although its competitors Boeing and Douglas struggled mightily just to stay in the air, both companies had commercial aircraft that dominated the domestic market. Lockheed had none. Things were so bad for Lockheed that by 1932, the Burbank-based company was bankrupt and in federal receivership. The company needed a savior and needed one right away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1996
Pioneer aviator Bobbi Trout still remembers being enthralled when she saw her first airplane as a child in the early 1900s. She knew then she would one day fly. Trout did not have long to wait. In 1927 she became only the fifth woman in the nation to receive a pilot's license. She immediately began setting world records, flying experimental planes and becoming one of the country's most influential women aviators.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1985
I read with delight "Air Force May Still Buy Northrop Jet" (April 26). For the first time since who knows when, the Congress and the Pentagon are actually using valuable information and logic to consider the purchase of fighter aircraft for use by our own military forces. Historically, if one goes back to the days of John Northrop's Flying Wing aircraft design of the 1950s, we find a continual political dogfight that Northrop would have no part of. Back in the mid-1960s, I was in Texas for my Air National Guard training and, during that time, we saw films on the F-111 from General Dynamics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996
Hollywood has its Walk of Fame, and Sepulveda Boulevard in Westchester is poised to take off as the "walk of planes"--the aviation equivalent of Tinseltown's star-studded sidewalk. Ten flight pioneers were honored Thursday in ceremonies on the city's Flight Path, a sort of walk through aviation history that was unveiled last year in a mini-mall.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Max R. Stanley, a pioneer test pilot who flew the experimental Flying Wing 40 years before development of its modern counterpart, the B-2 Stealth bomber, has died. He was 89. Stanley, considered the dean of Northrop test pilots, died Saturday in his Brentwood home, said his wife, Judie Scott Stanley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000
The University of California has been home to 43 Nobel Prize winners. Last week, three UC professors won prizes for chemistry, physics and economics. Here is a list of Nobel laureates. Berkeley *--* Laureate Year Field Ernest O. Lawrence 1939 Physics John H. Northrop 1946 Chemistry Wendell M. Stanley 1946 Chemistry William F. Giauque 1949 Chemistry Edwin M. McMillan 1951 Chemistry Glenn T. Seaborg 1951 Chemistry Emilio G. Segre 1959 Physics Owen Chamberlain* 1959 Physics Donald A.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
It has titillated fliers and designers and eccentrics for half a century--an airplane fully contained within a sleek boomerang-shaped wing, an aesthetic tour de force, a flying wing. Once it had a promising future on both sides of the Atlantic and then it faded away, the victim of aerial instability and lost government contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1987 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
A pioneering aviation enthusiast who helped found two early aircraft industry companies and a technical training school has died in her Pasadena home. Blanche Wilbur Hill, an Idaho-born philanthropist and socialite who obtained her pilot's license in 1931, when few women had even been in an airplane, was 85. She was first married to George Randolph Hearst, the eldest son of publishing tycoon William Randolph Hearst, and later married Cortland Taylor Hill, grandson of railroad magnate James J.
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