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John O Callaghan

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
We hear the overture. A thundering capitulation of the movie's principal themes. Hard-driving. Loud. Its pounding rhythms taper off and we hear the sound of a dry constant wind.... There's an exchange of gunfire, ending in the roar of a shotgun blast. ... FADE IN exterior.... The setting sun fills the screen.... We see Kyle standing alone, looking through binoculars. The sky behind him is leaden and gray over a landscape of twisted rock and half-burned scrub brush.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
We hear the overture. A thundering capitulation of the movie's principal themes. Hard-driving. Loud. Its pounding rhythms taper off and we hear the sound of a dry constant wind.... There's an exchange of gunfire, ending in the roar of a shotgun blast. ... FADE IN exterior.... The setting sun fills the screen.... We see Kyle standing alone, looking through binoculars. The sky behind him is leaden and gray over a landscape of twisted rock and half-burned scrub brush.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Ralph McInerny, a longtime professor of philosophy and medieval studies at the University of Notre Dame who also was a popular mystery writer best known for his Father Dowling series of novels, has died. He was 80. McInerny died Jan. 29 at Our Lady of Peace Hospital in Mishawaka, Ind., after a long illness, according to the university. A member of the Notre Dame faculty from 1955 until his retirement in 2009, McInerny gained international renown as a scholar, author and lecturer who specialized in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas, the 13th century theologian and philosopher.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
In late July, after playing a sold-out show at Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles, DJ Kaskade headed down the street to play an intimate after-party at a nightclub called Exchange L.A. There he electrified electronic dance music fans with an entirely different set featuring an old-school mash-up of deep house and tech house. The scene was exactly what Exchange L.A. is becoming known and celebrated for since partnering in June with Insomniac, which produces and promotes some of the largest and most influential EDM concerts in the country, including the massive Electric Daisy Carnival.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the music of U2, the Cranberries and Van Morrison, to Frank McCourt's best-selling memoir "Angela's Ashes," to the growing popularity of Irish pubs and Guinness beer, to movies like "Waking Ned Divine," and "The Commitments," Americans seem to be in love with Irish culture. So why hasn't Ireland's most popular sport--Gaelic football--captured this country's attention? Probably because the game is about as difficult to understand as a thick Irish brogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | David C. Nichols;F. Kathleen Foley;Rob Kendt
It's Oscar night in Beverly Hills. Self-absorbed auteur Bruce Delamitri prepares for the annual glad-handing orgy. Gallingly, Bruce's estranged wife, Farrah, won't reschedule their next-day property settlement session, as she informs him while collecting their nymphet daughter, Velvet. Bruce's caustic producer browbeats him over the PR nightmare that his nominated film, "Ordinary Americans," has caused.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
A state-mandated effort to make California communities more accessible to movie production has been a flop so far in Orange County, despite the weeklong filming of NBC's "Blind Faith" miniseries scheduled to end here today. Upbeat assessments by state and county officials notwithstanding, the California Film Commission guidelines to ease the granting of film permits has had no visible impact on any of the county's 27 cities. Last week, County Supervisor Gaddi H.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2004 | David C. Nichols; F. Kathleen Foley; Philip Brandes; Rob Kendt
In 1996, Martin McDonagh's first play, "The Beauty Queen of Leenane," announced a major new voice in Irish theater. "Beauty Queen's" acclaimed runs in London and New York (where it received four Tonys) launched McDonagh's Leenane trilogy, named for a hamlet in Connemara. The other entries, both from 1997, are "A Skull in Connemara" and "The Lonesome West," the latter receiving a wild-eyed revival at the Odyssey Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | Philip Brandes;David C. Nichols;F. Kathleen Foley
In tackling Tennessee Williams' rarely seen "Camino Real," Company Rep signals gutsy artistic ambitions with a take-no-prisoners inaugural production as the new resident ensemble at NoHo's prominent American Renegade Theatre. Something of a Waterloo in Williams' career, the still-problematic "Camino Real" (pronounced "KA-minnow reel") baffled 1953 audiences with its kaleidoscopic journey through a surreal landscape densely populated with archetypes from different periods of Western civilization.
SPORTS
November 14, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Doug Scovil does not have political aspirations, but there is a little bit of a politician within him. He tends to talk about the future, but, when the future arrives, it is not always as rosy as the picture that was painted. Scovil came to San Diego State in 1981 with a five-year plan revolving around freshman recruiting. Yet, as Scovil nears the end of his fifth season with the Aztecs, the freshman recruiting program is not exactly being compared to a Rembrandt.
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