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John O Conor

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993
Readers responded with sincerity, wit and, occasionally, vehemence to our queries for their assessments of the best and worst in pop music, theater, art, classical music and dance in Orange County in 1992. Here is some of what they had to say: My two favorite performances: Mendelssohn's "Elijah," sung by Sherrill Milnes and the Pacific Chorale. Pacific Symphony concert featuring Mahler's Symphony No. 1 and an incredibly beautiful performance by pianist John O'Conor of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 17. VINA WILLIAMS Tustin
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993
Readers responded with sincerity, wit and, occasionally, vehemence to our queries for their assessments of the best and worst in pop music, theater, art, classical music and dance in Orange County in 1992. Here is some of what they had to say: My two favorite performances: Mendelssohn's "Elijah," sung by Sherrill Milnes and the Pacific Chorale. Pacific Symphony concert featuring Mahler's Symphony No. 1 and an incredibly beautiful performance by pianist John O'Conor of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 17. VINA WILLIAMS Tustin
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Field, one of the first Romantic composers, invented the nocturne and influenced many who followed. But pianist John O'Conor--who will play with the Pacific Symphony tonight when its season begins in Costa Mesa--champions his fellow Irishman because "I think he is important in his own right." "I think it's important that his music should not be disregarded purely because of the wonderful nocturnes that Chopin and other composers wrote," O'Conor said last week from his home in Dublin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Field, one of the first Romantic composers, invented the nocturne and influenced many who followed. But pianist John O'Conor--who will play with the Pacific Symphony tonight when its season begins in Costa Mesa--champions his fellow Irishman because "I think he is important in his own right." "I think it's important that his music should not be disregarded purely because of the wonderful nocturnes that Chopin and other composers wrote," O'Conor said last week from his home in Dublin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1989 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Fullerton High School on a Sunday afternoon might seem an unlikely place for a winner of two major international piano competitions to make his Southern California debut. Nevertheless, there he was, Irish pianist John O'Conor, winner of both the International Beethoven Competition and the Bosendorfer Piano Competition, ready to perform at the appointed time and place for the North Orange County Community Concert Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1992 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
The ghost of Leonard Bernstein--who died two years and two days ago--hangs over many musical places, not least over the podium at the Orange County-based Pacific Symphony, where Bernstein's protege, Carl St.Clair, presides as music director. Now 40, and beginning his third season with the Pacific ensemble, St.Clair sometimes puts together programs of remarkable symmetry and musical sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pacific Symphony will premiere a new work by its composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli and play Joan Tower's "Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman," her response to Copland's famous "Fanfare for the Common Man," during the orchestra's 1992-93 classical season. At a press conference Tuesday morning, music director Carl St. Clair said he is enthusiastic about preparing Ticheli's piece because working with a composer "gets me as close to the creative process as a conductor can be."
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