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John O Hara

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April 9, 1989 | JACKSON J. BENSON
John Steinbeck and Ernest Hemingway did not know each other personally, although they had a number of friends, such as the photographer Robert Capa, in common. Both writers were nearly silent about each other's work in public; however, as one might expect from their personalities, Steinbeck spoke very well in private of Hemingway's work, referring to him several times in letters as "in many ways . . . the finest writer of our time," whereas all of Hemingway's references in his letters are disparaging of Steinbeck as a popular and prolific writer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Fran Lebowitz has called him “the real F. Scott Fitzgerald.” Ernest Hemingway said he was “a man who knows exactly what he is writing about and has written it marvelously well.” But mention John O'Hara today - 43 years after his death at age 65 - and you're likely to draw a look as blank as an unwritten book. Why? In part, perhaps, it's a matter of personality: O'Hara was, by all accounts, difficult to get along with, a social climber, a bully, a vicious drunk. And yet, he also wrote three of the finest novels of the 1930s - “Appointment in Samarra,” “BUtterfield 8” and the woefully under-recognized “Hope of Heaven” - as well as dozens of short stories that are exemplars of the form.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
John O'Hara, who needled the upper middle class in such novels as "Butterfield 8" and "Pal Joey," began his writing career as a journalist in Pottsville, Pa., the coal town where he grew up in the early 1900s and which provided the setting for much of his later fiction. But the articles he wrote as a general assignment reporter for the Pottsville Journal are missing -- and have been since the paper folded in the early 1950s and its archives were transferred to the local historical society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matthew J. Bruccoli, 76, a University of South Carolina English professor who wrote and edited about two dozen books on author F. Scott Fitzgerald, died Wednesday of a brain tumor at his home in Columbia, S.C. Bruccoli taught at the university for almost 40 years and was the Emily Brown Jefferies distinguished professor emeritus. He was best known for his authoritative works on Fitzgerald, including "Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald" (1981) and "Scott and Ernest: The Fitzgerald-Hemingway Friendship" (1978)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matthew J. Bruccoli, 76, a University of South Carolina English professor who wrote and edited about two dozen books on author F. Scott Fitzgerald, died Wednesday of a brain tumor at his home in Columbia, S.C. Bruccoli taught at the university for almost 40 years and was the Emily Brown Jefferies distinguished professor emeritus. He was best known for his authoritative works on Fitzgerald, including "Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald" (1981) and "Scott and Ernest: The Fitzgerald-Hemingway Friendship" (1978)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1986 | LEONEL SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
About 600 people attended a memorial service Friday for Westminster High School football coach Jim O'Hara, who died Monday of a heart attack shortly after jogging at the school. "He loved sports and believed in helping young people learn the true value of sportsmanship," said his brother, John O'Hara, during services at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in Garden Grove.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | CAROLYN SEE
Breaker Boys by Jan Kubicki (Atlantic Monthly: $17.95; 384 pp.) "Breaker Boys" is a history lesson dressed up like a novel. Liking this book depends entirely on whether you're interested in this chunk of history. Edification, not enjoyment, is the key here, but that's not necessarily a non-compliment. "The year," the jacket blurb remarks, "is 1900 in the coal town of Jeddoh, Pennsylvania."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Fran Lebowitz has called him “the real F. Scott Fitzgerald.” Ernest Hemingway said he was “a man who knows exactly what he is writing about and has written it marvelously well.” But mention John O'Hara today - 43 years after his death at age 65 - and you're likely to draw a look as blank as an unwritten book. Why? In part, perhaps, it's a matter of personality: O'Hara was, by all accounts, difficult to get along with, a social climber, a bully, a vicious drunk. And yet, he also wrote three of the finest novels of the 1930s - “Appointment in Samarra,” “BUtterfield 8” and the woefully under-recognized “Hope of Heaven” - as well as dozens of short stories that are exemplars of the form.
BOOKS
August 31, 1997 | BENJAMIN SCHWARZ, Benjamin Schwarz is executive editor of World Policy Journal
The Modern Library's decision to issue John O'Hara's 1949 novel, "A Rage to Live," seems nothing short of perverse. Readers may want a new hardcover of, say, Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" with that golden dust jacket to replace their dog-eared college paperback, or they may want to display a handsome edition of Hawthorne's novels. Or they may be happy to discover a neglected gem, like A.J. Liebling's "Between Meals." But O'Hara's work seems old without being "classic."
BOOKS
June 6, 1993 | Lawrence S. Dietz, Dietz is working on a book about the Chandler family and the development of Los Angeles
One of the maladies of the 1990s is that we seem to suffer cultural amnesia--an inability to remember what we found valuable even a few years ago. The publication of this collection of all 56 of John O'Hara's superb stories and novellas set in Gibbsville, Pa., reminds us of this deficiency, which we excuse by pointing to the avalanche of intellectual and entertainment material that floods us. Amid the din, it has been too easy to forget about O'Hara.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
John O'Hara, who needled the upper middle class in such novels as "Butterfield 8" and "Pal Joey," began his writing career as a journalist in Pottsville, Pa., the coal town where he grew up in the early 1900s and which provided the setting for much of his later fiction. But the articles he wrote as a general assignment reporter for the Pottsville Journal are missing -- and have been since the paper folded in the early 1950s and its archives were transferred to the local historical society.
BOOKS
August 31, 1997 | BENJAMIN SCHWARZ, Benjamin Schwarz is executive editor of World Policy Journal
The Modern Library's decision to issue John O'Hara's 1949 novel, "A Rage to Live," seems nothing short of perverse. Readers may want a new hardcover of, say, Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" with that golden dust jacket to replace their dog-eared college paperback, or they may want to display a handsome edition of Hawthorne's novels. Or they may be happy to discover a neglected gem, like A.J. Liebling's "Between Meals." But O'Hara's work seems old without being "classic."
BOOKS
June 6, 1993 | Lawrence S. Dietz, Dietz is working on a book about the Chandler family and the development of Los Angeles
One of the maladies of the 1990s is that we seem to suffer cultural amnesia--an inability to remember what we found valuable even a few years ago. The publication of this collection of all 56 of John O'Hara's superb stories and novellas set in Gibbsville, Pa., reminds us of this deficiency, which we excuse by pointing to the avalanche of intellectual and entertainment material that floods us. Amid the din, it has been too easy to forget about O'Hara.
BOOKS
April 9, 1989 | JACKSON J. BENSON
John Steinbeck and Ernest Hemingway did not know each other personally, although they had a number of friends, such as the photographer Robert Capa, in common. Both writers were nearly silent about each other's work in public; however, as one might expect from their personalities, Steinbeck spoke very well in private of Hemingway's work, referring to him several times in letters as "in many ways . . . the finest writer of our time," whereas all of Hemingway's references in his letters are disparaging of Steinbeck as a popular and prolific writer.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | CAROLYN SEE
Breaker Boys by Jan Kubicki (Atlantic Monthly: $17.95; 384 pp.) "Breaker Boys" is a history lesson dressed up like a novel. Liking this book depends entirely on whether you're interested in this chunk of history. Edification, not enjoyment, is the key here, but that's not necessarily a non-compliment. "The year," the jacket blurb remarks, "is 1900 in the coal town of Jeddoh, Pennsylvania."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1986 | LEONEL SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
About 600 people attended a memorial service Friday for Westminster High School football coach Jim O'Hara, who died Monday of a heart attack shortly after jogging at the school. "He loved sports and believed in helping young people learn the true value of sportsmanship," said his brother, John O'Hara, during services at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in Garden Grove.
SPORTS
February 24, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John O'Hara, Iowa's offensive line coach, died of a heart attack while on a Caribbean cruise with the Hawkeyes' staff.
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