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John Ottman

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2006 | Scott Timberg
WHEN Hollywood composer John Ottman, who wrote the scores for director Bryan Singer's "The Usual Suspects" and "X2: X-Men United," was approached about scoring Singer's latest, "Superman Returns," he admits he was a bit daunted. "There was a great weight on my shoulders because of the strength of the original theme," he says of the John Williams melody that accompanied director Richard Donner's 1978 film "Superman."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2006 | Scott Timberg
WHEN Hollywood composer John Ottman, who wrote the scores for director Bryan Singer's "The Usual Suspects" and "X2: X-Men United," was approached about scoring Singer's latest, "Superman Returns," he admits he was a bit daunted. "There was a great weight on my shoulders because of the strength of the original theme," he says of the John Williams melody that accompanied director Richard Donner's 1978 film "Superman."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003 | Jon Burlingame, Special to The Times
Hollywood is full of hyphenates: writer-directors, director-producers, even director-composers. But, as far as we can tell, John Ottman is the town's only composer-editor. He has functioned as both film editor and score composer on four of director Bryan Singer's five movies, winning the British version of the Academy Award for editing 1995's "The Usual Suspects." His latest dual effort is on Singer's "X2: X-Men United," which opened last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003 | Jon Burlingame, Special to The Times
Hollywood is full of hyphenates: writer-directors, director-producers, even director-composers. But, as far as we can tell, John Ottman is the town's only composer-editor. He has functioned as both film editor and score composer on four of director Bryan Singer's five movies, winning the British version of the Academy Award for editing 1995's "The Usual Suspects." His latest dual effort is on Singer's "X2: X-Men United," which opened last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2000 | DAVID CHUTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The coolest single element in the walk-don't-run horror sequel "Urban Legends: Final Cut" may be its atmospheric setting, the actual rural campus of Trent University, in Peterborough, Ontario. With blocky poured-concrete buildings and a river-spanning bridge plopped down among wooded hills, the place is a bizarre stylistic mix of faux Frank Lloyd Wright and grim Stalinist modern; call it institutional gothic. Trent U. must be a pretty oppressive place to spend one's college years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Usual Suspects" is a maze that moviegoers will be happy to get lost in, a criminal roller coaster with twists so unsettling no choice exists but to hold on and go along for the ride. A fatalistic tale of power, betrayal, crime and punishment, spiced with just a whiff of romance, it is more than anything a polished exercise in pure virtuoso style. The key stylist is director Bryan Singer, whose debut film, "Public Access," won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance a few years back.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The year's first laugh-out-loud-funny thriller, "Hide and Seek," owes much to Stephen King and not a little to the perilous path of being too self-referential. "Come out, come out, wherever you are!" beckons an oft-repeated piece of dialogue, echoing star Robert De Niro's Max Cady in the 1991 version of "Cape Fear." It's a silly connective -- using intentional humor to leaven the tension.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Adapted from a Stephen King novella, and staged like a two-character David Mamet play, Bryan Singer's "Apt Pupil" is a curious big-screen project, to be sure. Add in the subject matter, a teenage boy's obsession with an ex-Nazi's concentration camp reveries, and the experience is like staring at molecular evil through an electron microscope. Ultimately, the view is too close for either comfort or scrutiny.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Action thrillers are fun when filmmakers teeter at the edge of implausibility -- without slipping over it. If "Collateral" is an excellent example of how to go right up to the brink with finesse, "Cellular" illustrates what happens when a viable premise is spoiled by sheer preposterousness. The movie strains to divert audiences but short-changes them instead. Written by Chris Morgan from a story by shrewd veteran Larry Cohen and directed by David R.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
In spring, a studio's fancy turns to thoughts of unreleasable movies. And how to release them. In the case of "Goodbye Lover," the distributors / producers decided on attaching one of those enticing requests to the usual press notes: "Warner Bros. and New Regency would appreciate your not revealing to your readers and viewers who's doing what to whom."
NEWS
June 21, 2007 | Andrew Hiltzik
Not all Los Angeles Film Festival activities involve watching movies. Here are some of the festival's more offbeat highlights: * Party! "The Transformers" premieres in multiple theaters in Westwood Village on Wednesday, followed by an outdoor block party. Tickets, $25. * Show up and sing. One of the most popular episodes of Joss Whedon's cult favorite show, "Buffy: The Vampire Slayer," was a musical episode titled "Once More With Feeling."
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