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John P Abizaid

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WORLD
March 2, 2005 | Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writer
The top U.S. general in the Middle East said Tuesday that the failure of insurgents to prevent millions of Iraqis from voting in January showed that the violent guerrilla movement was fizzling. Citing estimates from field commanders, Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, head of the U.S. Central Command, told a Senate committee that approximately 3,500 insurgents were involved in planning and executing the roughly 300 attacks on election day, Jan. 30.
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WORLD
March 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, who has overseen military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan since shortly after U.S. forces invaded Iraq in 2003, will stay on for another year, defense officials said Tuesday. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld recently asked Abizaid to stay for at least another year beyond this summer, one official said. The officials who discussed the matter did so on condition of anonymity because the extension had not been announced.
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WORLD
March 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, who has overseen military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan since shortly after U.S. forces invaded Iraq in 2003, will stay on for another year, defense officials said Tuesday. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld recently asked Abizaid to stay for at least another year beyond this summer, one official said. The officials who discussed the matter did so on condition of anonymity because the extension had not been announced.
WORLD
March 2, 2005 | Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writer
The top U.S. general in the Middle East said Tuesday that the failure of insurgents to prevent millions of Iraqis from voting in January showed that the violent guerrilla movement was fizzling. Citing estimates from field commanders, Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, head of the U.S. Central Command, told a Senate committee that approximately 3,500 insurgents were involved in planning and executing the roughly 300 attacks on election day, Jan. 30.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2006 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Top U.S. military commanders in Iraq have decided to recommend a "surge" of fresh American combat forces, eliminating one of the last remaining hurdles to proposals being considered by President Bush for a troop increase, a defense official familiar with the plan said Friday. The approval of a troop increase plan by top Iraq commanders, including Gen. George W. Casey Jr. and Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, comes days before Bush unveils a new course for the troubled U.S. involvement in Iraq.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2006 | From Reuters
The top U.S. general in the Middle East said Friday that if the world did not find a way to stem the rise of Islamic militancy, it would face a third world war. Army Gen. John P. Abizaid compared the rise of militant ideologies, such as the force driving Al Qaeda, with the rise of fascism in Europe that set the stage for World War II.
OPINION
October 5, 2005
Amazing to read the fatuous optimism of the Army leadership regarding the Iraq debacle (Oct. 3). Gen. John P. Abizaid even claims that his commanders are "confident that they're moving in a good direction." Really? What direction is that? Occupying Iraq in perpetuity? Driving the U.S. into bankruptcy? The Bush administration has failed to identify any concrete goals for its invasion; how can the military claim to know what it's trying to do when its commander in chief has no idea? Our brave soldiers have been sent to die for a lost cause.
WORLD
May 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Army officials knew within days of Pat Tillman's death that the former NFL player had been killed by fellow Rangers during a patrol in Afghanistan but did not inform his family and the public for weeks, a published report says. A new Army report shows that Gen. John P.
WORLD
March 7, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
The top U.S. envoy to Iraq said Monday that the 2003 toppling of Saddam Hussein's regime had opened a "Pandora's box" of volatile ethnic and sectarian tensions that could engulf the region in all-out war if America pulled out of the country too soon. In remarks that were among the frankest and bleakest public assessments of the Iraq situation by a high-level American official, U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad said the "potential is there" for sectarian violence to become full-blown civil war.
WORLD
October 31, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Army has extended by two months the Iraq tours of about 6,500 soldiers, citing a need for experienced troops through the Iraqi elections scheduled for late January. About 3,500 soldiers of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, and 3,000 from the 1st Infantry Division headquarters will remain in Iraq two months longer than planned, Bryan Whitman, a Pentagon spokesman, said Saturday.
WORLD
March 17, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
The top U.S. military commander for the Middle East offered rare words of praise Thursday for Syria, saying Damascus has taken steps to stop the movement of foreign fighters over its border into Iraq. Army Gen. John P. Abizaid said Syria had begun taking action on long-standing complaints by the United States about foreign fighters, one of several issues dividing the two countries. Abizaid, the chief of U.S. Central Command, was asked by Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.
OPINION
March 28, 2010 | By Tom Hayden
Without public debate and without congressional hearings, a segment of the Pentagon and fellow travelers have embraced a doctrine known as the Long War, which projects an "arc of instability" caused by insurgent groups from Europe to South Asia that will last between 50 and 80 years. According to one of its architects, Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan are just "small wars in the midst of a big one." Consider the audacity of such an idea. An 80-year undeclared war would entangle 20 future presidential terms stretching far into the future of voters not yet born.
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