Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Parducci
IN THE NEWS

John Parducci

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mendocino Wine Pioneer Fired: John Parducci was sacked as general manager of the winery bearing his name by Teachers Management Corp., the Newport Beach investment partnership. Parducci, 76, who sold almost all of his stake in the winery in 1973 when TMI acquired Parducci Wine Cellars, said he was barred from entering the winery. Jim Martin, president of TMI, said Parducci was fired because of his relationship with personnel at the facility.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mendocino Wine Pioneer Fired: John Parducci was sacked as general manager of the winery bearing his name by Teachers Management Corp., the Newport Beach investment partnership. Parducci, 76, who sold almost all of his stake in the winery in 1973 when TMI acquired Parducci Wine Cellars, said he was barred from entering the winery. Jim Martin, president of TMI, said Parducci was fired because of his relationship with personnel at the facility.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
November 27, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
WHEN IT COMES to wine making, Mendocino County's fine reputation continues to expand. John Parducci's stalwart pioneering of quality wine; the Fetzers; the newcomer, Jepson Vineyards; plus a few small wineries such as Husch, Navarro, Lazy Creek, Handley Cellars, Christine Woods and Greenwood Ridge all are contributing to the growing reputation of Mendocino County and the Anderson Valley in premier wine-making circles.
FOOD
August 15, 1991 | DAN BERGER
Ampelography--the study that identifies grape varieties by the structure of the leaves, the shape of the grape clusters and other physical evidence--is an obscure science. There are not many ampelographers anywhere, and as a result much misinformation in the world's wine regions gets handed down from father to son. Certainly a lot of unintentional misidentification of grapes still goes on in the United States.
FOOD
February 24, 1994 | DAN BERGER
The days when you could get clean, characterful dry white wine for less than $2 a 750-milliliter bottle are gone, but there are still a few low-priced whites around that will do to quench a thirst, wet a whistle or help put down the halibut. Moreover, inflation and tax increases have made that $2 wine into a $3 wine, and in some cases you have to buy it in double-sized 1.5-liter bottles (for $6).
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
In Jan. 22, 395 leaders of the wine industry gathered in the Peacock Court of the Mark Hopkins hotel atop Nob Hill in San Francisco to honor John Parducci on his 70th birthday. It was the culmination of a transcontinental tour, with wine-tasting stops in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles arranged by Brown-Forman of Louisville, Ky., Parducci's national distributor.
NEWS
April 19, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
San Francisco is staging a Hollywood event. And San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein will be there among the kleig lights, joining producers Albert R. Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson and a raft of stars for the world premiere of the latest James Bond thriller, "A View to Kill." All the glamour and glitz will come together on May 22 at the San Francisco Palace of Fine Arts Theatre.
NEWS
September 7, 1989
He confessed that he was horribly sad, having lost a good friend in New York recently to AIDS. But artist David Hockney, famous for portrayals of the California good life, proved that he has what it takes to be a celebrity on Saturday at the opening of his exhibit at the Modern Museum of Art: He knows how to fake it. He disguised his somber mood with a rainbow ensemble--cobalt-blue shirt, emerald-green belt and mustard-yellow tie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | BEVERLY BUSH SMITH
When it comes to Halloween (or any excuse for a party), you can count on Tony Hermann at Newport Beach's Bouzy Rouge to get into the spirit. "Transylvania beckons all yuppie vampires to the Bouzy Rouge next Tuesday night," he declares, claiming he's busy brewing up bat-wing bisque, werewolf tongues and meringue of black widow web. Actually he'll serve a shortened version of his regular menu. But there will be fortunetellers and a gypsy violinist.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|