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John Patrick

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NEWS
November 10, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Patrick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of "Teahouse of the August Moon" and a screenwriter who hit his stride in the 1950s with "Three Coins in a Fountain" and "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing," has died. He was 90. Patrick, who left a poem titled "A Suicide Note," was found Tuesday with a plastic bag over his head in the assisted care facility where he lived in Delray Beach, Fla.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Sam Quinones and Rich Connell
The Northern California man who drove across the country and tried Thursday to blast his way into the Pentagon was the author of rambling, conspiratorial-minded Internet treatises on politics and had suffered from mental illness, according to people close to his family and court records. John Patrick Bedell had been ill for at least 15 years, according to San Benito County Supervisor Reb Monaco, a friend of the Bedells for decades who spent time with the gunman's parents Thursday night after they received news of the shooting.
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BUSINESS
October 5, 1997 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IBM Corp. was a dinosaur on a path toward extinction four years ago when company strategist John Patrick hit on a way to revitalize the struggling giant. In "Get Connected," a paper widely circulated at IBM, Patrick argued that the modern corporation had to be networked not only to its employees, but also to its customers and suppliers around the globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2007 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
The starchy, unflattering habit worn by Sister Aloysius in "Doubt" comes in only two colors: black and white. But the dominant hue in John Patrick Shanley's Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning drama is gray -- multiple shades of it. A smash hit in New York when it opened in 2004, "Doubt" takes place on a metaphysical battlefield where there is no right or wrong, just degrees of moral relativity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Sam Quinones and Rich Connell
The Northern California man who drove across the country and tried Thursday to blast his way into the Pentagon was the author of rambling, conspiratorial-minded Internet treatises on politics and had suffered from mental illness, according to people close to his family and court records. John Patrick Bedell had been ill for at least 15 years, according to San Benito County Supervisor Reb Monaco, a friend of the Bedells for decades who spent time with the gunman's parents Thursday night after they received news of the shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright John Patrick, of "The Hasty Heart" and the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Teahouse of the August Moon" fame, didn't often deal with whimsy. When he did, as in his 1950 comedy "The Curious Savage," his light touch was memorable, It was written for Lillian Gish and requires an equally light touch in its direction, and Stephen Gomer gets most of it right in his staging at the Cabrillo Playhouse.
BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | Marvin Seid
The two decades between America's entry into World War II and the inauguration of John F. Kennedy saw the nation transformed. Even as the war and the ideological conflict that followed it rearranged the political map of Europe and prepared the way for an end to colonial rule in Asia, so the sudden burden of international responsibility thrust on the United States quashed any lingering hope that the country could somehow hold aloof from the woes and demands of the rest of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
The drama of ideas hasn't been in vogue for ages. George Bernard Shaw, the master of the form, was one of the few playwrights in the last hundred years capable of turning heady intellectual argument into something theatrically electric. In his hands, the collision of perspectives, delivered in the crispest of English prose, had an intensity that could leave even shrieking melodrama in the dust.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Patrick Shanley, author of the romantic comedy "Moonstruck," is the creator of "The Dreamer Examines His Pillow," a one-act play in brief run at the Plaza Players Theatre in Ventura. It's Doreen Lacy's senior directing project for UC Santa Barbara and--more important to the audience--an opportunity to see some impressive acting in a relatively unexposed vehicle. Like "Moonstruck," "The Dreamer . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
The gin joint could be anywhere, but it happens to be a dive in the Bronx; the lovers could be anyone, but they're neighborhood types who've seen better days. It's an old story -- strangers in the night. But a writer like John Patrick Shanley can remind us that falling in love mixes terror and thrills in ways that knock you flat. Now Elephant Stage Works, in association with Volition Entertainment, has revived Shanley's irresistible 1984 two-hander, "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
The gin joint could be anywhere, but it happens to be a dive in the Bronx; the lovers could be anyone, but they're neighborhood types who've seen better days. It's an old story -- strangers in the night. But a writer like John Patrick Shanley can remind us that falling in love mixes terror and thrills in ways that knock you flat. Now Elephant Stage Works, in association with Volition Entertainment, has revived Shanley's irresistible 1984 two-hander, "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
The drama of ideas hasn't been in vogue for ages. George Bernard Shaw, the master of the form, was one of the few playwrights in the last hundred years capable of turning heady intellectual argument into something theatrically electric. In his hands, the collision of perspectives, delivered in the crispest of English prose, had an intensity that could leave even shrieking melodrama in the dust.
MAGAZINE
December 16, 2001 | FRED DICKEY, Fred Dickey last wrote for the magazine about the criminal investivation of a San Diego wildlife activist
Through the plate glass separating prisoners from visitors, John Patrick Sheridan talks about the secret he kept for a decade. He explains how loyalty to a drinking buddy and a promise of $25,000 were enough for him to murder someone. He describes how he planned the killing and rehearsed it, and then pulled it off without a hitch. Yes, he says, he was lucky for a first-time hit man. Lucky, that is, except for one thing.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1997 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IBM Corp. was a dinosaur on a path toward extinction four years ago when company strategist John Patrick hit on a way to revitalize the struggling giant. In "Get Connected," a paper widely circulated at IBM, Patrick argued that the modern corporation had to be networked not only to its employees, but also to its customers and suppliers around the globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright John Patrick, of "The Hasty Heart" and the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Teahouse of the August Moon" fame, didn't often deal with whimsy. When he did, as in his 1950 comedy "The Curious Savage," his light touch was memorable, It was written for Lillian Gish and requires an equally light touch in its direction, and Stephen Gomer gets most of it right in his staging at the Cabrillo Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Don't let the title of John Patrick Shanley's new play, "Psychopathia Sexualis," scare you off. This is not a serious examination of aberrant sexual stirrings as in Krafft-Ebbing's famous treatise, as the title and the program notes would have you believe. The sexual peculiarity that sets the action in motion--a sock fetish, to be exact--is but a red herring in argyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Don't let the title of John Patrick Shanley's new play, "Psychopathia Sexualis," scare you off. This is not a serious examination of aberrant sexual stirrings as in Krafft-Ebbing's famous treatise, as the title and the program notes would have you believe. The sexual peculiarity that sets the action in motion--a sock fetish, to be exact--is but a red herring in argyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Anyone who's followed American theater over the past decade has probably run across the name of director Daniel Sullivan. In fact, it would've been hard to avoid. A nearly ubiquitous presence, Sullivan has been responsible for developing and bringing to Broadway plays such as Herb Gardner's "I'm Not Rappaport" (1985) and Wendy Wasserstein's "The Heidi Chronicles" (1989) (which went on to win a Tony and a Pulitzer) and "The Sisters Rosensweig" (1992).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Anyone who's followed American theater over the past decade has probably run across the name of director Daniel Sullivan. In fact, it would've been hard to avoid. A nearly ubiquitous presence, Sullivan has been responsible for developing and bringing to Broadway plays such as Herb Gardner's "I'm Not Rappaport" (1985) and Wendy Wasserstein's "The Heidi Chronicles" (1989) (which went on to win a Tony and a Pulitzer) and "The Sisters Rosensweig" (1992).
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Patrick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of "Teahouse of the August Moon" and a screenwriter who hit his stride in the 1950s with "Three Coins in a Fountain" and "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing," has died. He was 90. Patrick, who left a poem titled "A Suicide Note," was found Tuesday with a plastic bag over his head in the assisted care facility where he lived in Delray Beach, Fla.
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