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John Patrick Shanley

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January 22, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
The drama of ideas hasn't been in vogue for ages. George Bernard Shaw, the master of the form, was one of the few playwrights in the last hundred years capable of turning heady intellectual argument into something theatrically electric. In his hands, the collision of perspectives, delivered in the crispest of English prose, had an intensity that could leave even shrieking melodrama in the dust.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
A vacant laundry becomes the moral crucible for competing interests in a financially depressed Bronx borough in John Patrick Shanley's “Storefront Church,” making its L.A. area premiere at NoHo Arts Center. Following “Doubt” and “Defiance,” this is the concluding play in Shanley's “Church and State” trilogy exploring ethical dilemmas at the intersection of institutional politics and individual responsibility. Although the piece lacks the tight focus and precision of “Doubt,” there's no mistaking Shanley's unique ability to illuminate complexities underlying topical issues.
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NEWS
August 4, 1994 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Patrick Shanley, author of the romantic comedy "Moonstruck," is the creator of "The Dreamer Examines His Pillow," a one-act play in brief run at the Plaza Players Theatre in Ventura. It's Doreen Lacy's senior directing project for UC Santa Barbara and--more important to the audience--an opportunity to see some impressive acting in a relatively unexposed vehicle. Like "Moonstruck," "The Dreamer . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2009 | Noel Murray
Doubt Miramax, $29.99; Blu-ray, $34.99 John Patrick Shanley's Tony-winning stage play "Doubt" tells the story of a brittle nun and the likable priest she accuses of child sexual abuse, and on stage at least, "Doubt's" measured, troubling inquiry into faith and cultural values left audiences shattered. The film version -- directed by Shanley -- doesn't have quite the same impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Don't let the title of John Patrick Shanley's new play, "Psychopathia Sexualis," scare you off. This is not a serious examination of aberrant sexual stirrings as in Krafft-Ebbing's famous treatise, as the title and the program notes would have you believe. The sexual peculiarity that sets the action in motion--a sock fetish, to be exact--is but a red herring in argyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
The gin joint could be anywhere, but it happens to be a dive in the Bronx; the lovers could be anyone, but they're neighborhood types who've seen better days. It's an old story -- strangers in the night. But a writer like John Patrick Shanley can remind us that falling in love mixes terror and thrills in ways that knock you flat. Now Elephant Stage Works, in association with Volition Entertainment, has revived Shanley's irresistible 1984 two-hander, "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2005 | From Reuters
A new play by John Patrick Shanley, who won a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award for his last play, "Doubt," will have its world premiere in New York next February, the Manhattan Theatre Club says. "Doubt" was a provocative story about a Catholic priest suspected by a nun of molesting children, and the new play, "Defiance," promises to be equally controversial. The producers said in a statement it was set on a U.S. Marine Corps base in North Carolina in 1971.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Welcome to the Moon" is an apt title for the evening of John Patrick Shanley one-acts at McCadden Theatre. They play like tentative doodles that Shanley might have tossed off in the process of creating his screenplay for "Moonstruck." In other words, they're slight and gooey, with characters who are frequently swept away by the romance of the moon or the stars--moments that lose their effectiveness when repeated too often. Most of the brief plays--sketches, really--are instantly forgettable.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008
Here's a complete list of the nominees for the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.'s Golden Globes Awards, to be presented Jan. 11: Picture (drama) "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" Film "Frost/Nixon" "The Reader" "Revolutionary Road" "Slumdog Millionaire" Picture (musical or comedy) "Burn After Reading" "Happy-Go-Lucky" "In Bruges" "Mamma Mia!"
NEWS
December 10, 2008 | John Horn
In a powerful sermon in writer-director John Patrick Shanley's "Doubt," a film about suspicion, judgment and moral certitude, Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman) preaches about the consequences of bearing false witness. In the old fable he relates to his congregation, a woman is instructed by a priest to cut open a pillow on a rooftop and is then admonished by him that, as its feathers scatter beyond recovery, so too does the malice of gossip.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2008 | John Horn, Horn is a Times staff writer.
John Patrick Shanley is rarely at a loss for high-quality words. His script for 1987's "Moonstruck" won the original screenplay Oscar, 2002's television movie "Live From Baghdad" brought him a shared Emmy nomination, and his 2004 play "Doubt: A Parable" captured the Tony and the Pulitzer for drama. Shanley's tougher test has been crafting equally compelling visuals to accompany his prose.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2007 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
The starchy, unflattering habit worn by Sister Aloysius in "Doubt" comes in only two colors: black and white. But the dominant hue in John Patrick Shanley's Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning drama is gray -- multiple shades of it. A smash hit in New York when it opened in 2004, "Doubt" takes place on a metaphysical battlefield where there is no right or wrong, just degrees of moral relativity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
The gin joint could be anywhere, but it happens to be a dive in the Bronx; the lovers could be anyone, but they're neighborhood types who've seen better days. It's an old story -- strangers in the night. But a writer like John Patrick Shanley can remind us that falling in love mixes terror and thrills in ways that knock you flat. Now Elephant Stage Works, in association with Volition Entertainment, has revived Shanley's irresistible 1984 two-hander, "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
The drama of ideas hasn't been in vogue for ages. George Bernard Shaw, the master of the form, was one of the few playwrights in the last hundred years capable of turning heady intellectual argument into something theatrically electric. In his hands, the collision of perspectives, delivered in the crispest of English prose, had an intensity that could leave even shrieking melodrama in the dust.
NEWS
December 10, 2008 | John Horn
In a powerful sermon in writer-director John Patrick Shanley's "Doubt," a film about suspicion, judgment and moral certitude, Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman) preaches about the consequences of bearing false witness. In the old fable he relates to his congregation, a woman is instructed by a priest to cut open a pillow on a rooftop and is then admonished by him that, as its feathers scatter beyond recovery, so too does the malice of gossip.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2005 | Don Shirley
Playwright John Patrick Shanley says he was "incredibly weary of the standard bios in programs." So in his biography in the programs for his "Doubt," at the Pasadena Playhouse and in New York, Shanley recounts his less-than-illustrious academic career and then invites theatergoers to send their reactions to his play to an e-mail address he provides. Some of the e-mails may have made a difference in "Doubt."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2005 | From Reuters
A new play by John Patrick Shanley, who won a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award for his last play, "Doubt," will have its world premiere in New York next February, the Manhattan Theatre Club says. "Doubt" was a provocative story about a Catholic priest suspected by a nun of molesting children, and the new play, "Defiance," promises to be equally controversial. The producers said in a statement it was set on a U.S. Marine Corps base in North Carolina in 1971.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2005 | Don Shirley
Playwright John Patrick Shanley says he was "incredibly weary of the standard bios in programs." So in his biography in the programs for his "Doubt," at the Pasadena Playhouse and in New York, Shanley recounts his less-than-illustrious academic career and then invites theatergoers to send their reactions to his play to an e-mail address he provides. Some of the e-mails may have made a difference in "Doubt."
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