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John Paul Getty Ii

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a surprise move, John Paul Getty II, son of the late American oil baron, has donated 1 million ($1.55 million) to prevent the Malibu museum his father founded from buying Antonio Canova's neo-classical sculpture "The Three Graces" for 7.6 million (about $11.8 million) and exporting it from Britain.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a surprise move, John Paul Getty II, son of the late American oil baron, has donated 1 million ($1.55 million) to prevent the Malibu museum his father founded from buying Antonio Canova's neo-classical sculpture "The Three Graces" for 7.6 million (about $11.8 million) and exporting it from Britain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1985 | From Reuters
American millionaire John Paul Getty II has donated $700,000 for the expansion of the Imperial War Museum in London, the museum said Friday. The museum, which contains collections from the last two World Wars, has appealed for $3.5 million to build new galleries. The reclusive Getty, who lives in London, has become a patron of arts and sports in Britain by pumping millions of dollars into redevelopment schemes this year.
NEWS
June 13, 1986 | Associated Press
Queen Elizabeth II today awarded an honorary knighthood to American oil tycoon John Paul Getty II, one of Britain's most generous philanthropists and a resident of Britain for the past 15 years. Foreign Secretary Sir Geoffrey Howe recommended the award for Getty's "extensive benefactions to British art, sporting, humanitarian, environmental and other charitable causes."
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | Reuters
After a five-year struggle, Britain appears finally to have prevented the Three Graces sculpture from being exported to the Getty Museum in Malibu, thanks to a donation by a wealthy Dutch art collector. The Financial Times newspaper said today that Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza had pledged $1.24 million, the final installment needed to keep in Britain the 19th-Century marble sculpture by Italy's Antonio Canova.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | From Reuters
Queen Elizabeth II invested rock singer Bob Geldof as an honorary knight today for championing starving Africans and complimented the normally disheveled performer on his appearance in a tailored morning suit. American oil tycoon John Paul Getty II came out of seclusion to receive an honorary knighthood also at Buckingham Palace for his gifts to the British arts and various charitable causes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1985 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer
The National Gallery of Scotland has failed to block the controversial $10.5-million sale of an Italian Renaissance masterpiece painting to the J. Paul Getty Museum. It was unclear Monday, however, when the Malibu museum will take possession of Andrea Mantegna's "The Adoration of the Magi," which the museum bought in April for the record-setting price. A Getty spokesman said museum officials familiar with the transaction were away for the holidays and unavailable for comment.
NEWS
June 26, 1986 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Chinese Catholics shoved aside officials in Peking to kiss the ring of Roman Catholic Bishop Francis Quinn of Sacramento, the Panchen Lama led Buddhist priests in chanting sutras, and Taoist monks beat gongs and bells in simultaneous prayers for peace. The services at several places of worship in Peking were part of the World Conference on Religion and Peace, which opened in a nation that a decade ago banned worship and persecuted religious believers.
MAGAZINE
March 1, 1992 | William Tuohy, London\f7 bureau, Six Times correspondents from around the world offer brief portraits of fascinating streets in cities they have covered.
CHEYNE WALK, London Hidden along the banks of the River Thames, in London's Chelsea, the tree-shaded lane called Cheyne Walk evokes a sense of the past--and the artists and writers who lived there. It is not a long street, but it has a rich history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2011 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
J. Paul Getty III, a scion of the Getty oil dynasty whose tragedies - mutilation by kidnappers in the early 1970s and an incapacitating, drug-induced stroke in the 1980s - brought into high relief the dysfunctional relations that beset his famously wealthy family, has died in Buckinghamshire, England. He was 54. Getty, who had homes in the Los Angeles area for some years after his ordeals, died Saturday after a long illness, according to a statement from his actor-son, Balthazar. Left nearly blind and a quadriplegic after the stroke, Getty was known to the public largely for his misfortunes.
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