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September 3, 1994 | Reuters
After a five-year struggle, Britain appears finally to have prevented the Three Graces sculpture from being exported to the Getty Museum in Malibu, thanks to a donation by a wealthy Dutch art collector. The Financial Times newspaper said today that Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza had pledged $1.24 million, the final installment needed to keep in Britain the 19th-Century marble sculpture by Italy's Antonio Canova.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Making its most important acquisition of an illuminated manuscript since launching its renowned manuscripts collection 14 years ago, the J. Paul Getty Museum has purchased the Stammheim Missal, a 12th century German artwork that illustrates biblical stories in sparkling detail and brilliant color. Acquired at an undisclosed price, the manuscript is well known to scholars as a monument of Romanesque art and had been one of the finest works of medieval art in private hands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Making its most important acquisition of an illuminated manuscript since launching its renowned manuscripts collection 14 years ago, the J. Paul Getty Museum has purchased the Stammheim Missal, a 12th century German artwork that illustrates biblical stories in sparkling detail and brilliant color. Acquired at an undisclosed price, the manuscript is well known to scholars as a monument of Romanesque art and had been one of the finest works of medieval art in private hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A British court on Thursday rejected a key legal maneuver by the Getty Museum to win possession of "The Three Graces" by Italian sculptor Antonio Canova. The Los Angeles museum had challenged a decision by Stephen Dorrell, national heritage secretary, giving local donors more time to raise money to buy the statue and keep it in Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a surprise move, John Paul Getty II, son of the late American oil baron, has donated 1 million ($1.55 million) to prevent the Malibu museum his father founded from buying Antonio Canova's neo-classical sculpture "The Three Graces" for 7.6 million (about $11.8 million) and exporting it from Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A British court on Thursday rejected a key legal maneuver by the Getty Museum to win possession of "The Three Graces" by Italian sculptor Antonio Canova. The Los Angeles museum had challenged a decision by Stephen Dorrell, national heritage secretary, giving local donors more time to raise money to buy the statue and keep it in Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The media here are fond of describing J. Paul Getty Jr., Britain's most famous living philanthropist, as a recluse. They are also quick to brand some of his philanthropic gestures as slaps at an unloving and unloved father, the late J. Paul Getty Sr., whose fortune founded the Getty Museum in Malibu. Tempers flared over just this issue this week. Getty Jr. had pledged $1.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beaumont Newhall, artistic photographer, historian, curator and professor of photography, died Friday in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 84. Newhall died in the city where he had lived in retirement after a stroke, said Van Deren Coke of Santa Fe. Coke had succeeded Newhall as curator of the International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y. "I just want to convey the excitement and importance of photography.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1995 | TERRENCE M. FRANKLIN, Terrence M. Franklin and his wife, Sandy Hart Franklin, are attorneys in Los Angeles. and
Late last month, my wife and I went to the John Paul Getty Museum in Malibu to see a photography exhibit titled "Hidden Witness." The photographs were of and by African Americans, dating from the years shortly before, during and after the Civil War. The exhibit was intense and filled with ironies. Here were the expressions of hope and sadness and joy of our ancestors. We were communicating personally and directly with people who had been dead for more than 100 years.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Busy making sales calls most of the morning, Anne Zibalese--a sometimes-harried working mother--realizes amid all her office work that it's been a while since she has seen her son David, 13, and daughter Ashley, 11. Not to worry. She just gets up from her cluttered desk, walks to the back of the sales room, opens the door and peeks in. Inside, her children are busy doing schoolwork with their classmates. Nestled behind her sales office at G.T.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | Reuters
After a five-year struggle, Britain appears finally to have prevented the Three Graces sculpture from being exported to the Getty Museum in Malibu, thanks to a donation by a wealthy Dutch art collector. The Financial Times newspaper said today that Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza had pledged $1.24 million, the final installment needed to keep in Britain the 19th-Century marble sculpture by Italy's Antonio Canova.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The media here are fond of describing J. Paul Getty Jr., Britain's most famous living philanthropist, as a recluse. They are also quick to brand some of his philanthropic gestures as slaps at an unloving and unloved father, the late J. Paul Getty Sr., whose fortune founded the Getty Museum in Malibu. Tempers flared over just this issue this week. Getty Jr. had pledged $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a surprise move, John Paul Getty II, son of the late American oil baron, has donated 1 million ($1.55 million) to prevent the Malibu museum his father founded from buying Antonio Canova's neo-classical sculpture "The Three Graces" for 7.6 million (about $11.8 million) and exporting it from Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | Compiled by Deborah Sakamoto and David Sweet from information supplied by the Calendar staff
Sunday, May 27 The duo Milli Vanilli rose to rank among both the most loved and loathed pop acts last year. Their first headlining tour brings them to the Universal Amphitheatre on Sunday and again on Monday. Tears for Fears returns to Southern California with a performance at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre. Monday, May 28 With last year's "Crossroads" album, Tracy Chapman solidified her role as pop's conscience for the '90s.
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