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John Paul Vann

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"A Bright Shining Lie," Neil Sheehan's Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the Vietnam War, will come to the screen under the auspices of Jane Fonda Films, Guber-Peters Co. and Warner Bros. Fonda will function in a key production position, as will Peter Guber and Jon Peters, the production team behind best-picture Oscar winner "Rain Man." Warner Bros. will distribute the film, which will mark Fonda's first venture as a producer of a movie in which she does not appear. Author Sheehan won a Pulitzer last month for his telling of the war with a focus on American Lt. Col. John Paul Vann.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Tim Rutten
In the-not-so-very-distant past, when newspapers had staffs large enough to include a variety of talents, there were journalists known mainly for their sure-handling of breaking or specialized news and others valued mainly as writers. Among the latter there were always a few who labored so long and intensely over their stories that some colleagues -- and frustrated editors -- derisively referred to them as "stone cutters." It was meant to be an epithet, of course, but the metaphorically inclined sometimes would point out that those who work in stone, though they proceed slowly, sometimes produce monuments.
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NEWS
April 11, 1989
The Pulitzer Prize executive committee said it saw no reason to rescind the prize for nonfiction awarded to Neil Sheehan for his book "A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam." Several Vietnam veterans had charged that Sheehan had maligned the performance of members of the all-black 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea by charging they repeatedly fled in battle. The committee said the reference was only one paragraph in a 790 page book, and that it paralleled the Army history of the regiment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"A Bright Shining Lie," Neil Sheehan's Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the Vietnam War, will come to the screen under the auspices of Jane Fonda Films, Guber-Peters Co. and Warner Bros. Fonda will function in a key production position, as will Peter Guber and Jon Peters, the production team behind best-picture Oscar winner "Rain Man." Warner Bros. will distribute the film, which will mark Fonda's first venture as a producer of a movie in which she does not appear. Author Sheehan won a Pulitzer last month for his telling of the war with a focus on American Lt. Col. John Paul Vann.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Tim Rutten
In the-not-so-very-distant past, when newspapers had staffs large enough to include a variety of talents, there were journalists known mainly for their sure-handling of breaking or specialized news and others valued mainly as writers. Among the latter there were always a few who labored so long and intensely over their stories that some colleagues -- and frustrated editors -- derisively referred to them as "stone cutters." It was meant to be an epithet, of course, but the metaphorically inclined sometimes would point out that those who work in stone, though they proceed slowly, sometimes produce monuments.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
It was the most unlikely of guest lists. Daniel Ellsberg was there at the chapel at Arlington Cemetery; so was Maj. Gen. Edward Landsdale, the model for "The Ugly American" and the man who helped establish America's initial military presence in Vietnam in the 1950s. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy arrived late, but Joseph Alsop, the columnist who so firmly embodied the voice of America's blue-blood Establishment, was precisely, politely on time. Melvin Laird, the Secretary of Defense, was in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1998
Now that HBO's "A Bright Shining Lie" has aired, perhaps any of your readers who saw the film or, better yet, read the book, would like to right an incredible wrong. John Paul Vann's name is not on the Vietnam Wall! In the mind of the bureaucrats, the fact that he resigned from the Army seems to be more important than the fact that Vann died while in command of U.S. troops . . . nor his active participation in combat the very week he was killed. Whether or not you agree with HBO's interpretation of the book, surely viewers will agree that Vann's name deserves to be on the wall.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | Associated Press
A California newspaper columnist won the 1988 National Book Award for fiction Tuesday with a novel about a murder in Georgia, and another journalist captured the nonfiction prize with a book about Vietnam. Peter Dexter, 45, a columnist for the Sacramento Bee and a frequent contributor to national magazines, won for "Paris Trout," about the murder of a 14-year-old black girl by a white man in a small Georgia town just after World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992
In response to "Might We Lose Russia? Nixon Dares to Ask the Question," editorial, March 13: "Might we lose Russia?" A key to the solution of any problem (political or otherwise) lies in the questions one asks. There are a multitude of historical examples of the consequences of asking the wrong question. For example, in 1775 Lord North might have said: "Might we lose the Colonies?" In 1918, Woodrow Wilson, et al. might have said: "Might we lose Russia?" And, in 1948, Nixon probably said: "We are losing China!"
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Three previous National Book Awards winners--Don DeLillo, J. F. Powers and Peter Gay--are among the 10 writers nominated this year. DeLillo, who won in 1985 for "White Noise," was nominated Monday for "Libra," a novel based on the life of Lee Harvey Oswald and the events that led to President John F. Kennedy's assassination.
NEWS
April 11, 1989
The Pulitzer Prize executive committee said it saw no reason to rescind the prize for nonfiction awarded to Neil Sheehan for his book "A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam." Several Vietnam veterans had charged that Sheehan had maligned the performance of members of the all-black 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea by charging they repeatedly fled in battle. The committee said the reference was only one paragraph in a 790 page book, and that it paralleled the Army history of the regiment.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
It was the most unlikely of guest lists. Daniel Ellsberg was there at the chapel at Arlington Cemetery; so was Maj. Gen. Edward Landsdale, the model for "The Ugly American" and the man who helped establish America's initial military presence in Vietnam in the 1950s. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy arrived late, but Joseph Alsop, the columnist who so firmly embodied the voice of America's blue-blood Establishment, was precisely, politely on time. Melvin Laird, the Secretary of Defense, was in attendance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989
Two black Korean War-era Army officers have urged a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer to give back his award until he changes his portrayal of the Army's last all-black infantry regiment as a unit that repeatedly broke and ran from the enemy in Korea . A day after Neil Sheehan won the nonfiction award for "A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam," Lt. Col. Charles M. Bussey and Capt. David K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1989
Noting the criticism of two former Army officers, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Neil Sheehan said Saturday that he stands by what he has written about the black 24th Infantry Regiment's performance in the Korean War. "The problems of the 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea are well known and the regiment was finally disbanded in 1951," Sheehan said in a telephone interview from his home in the Washington, D.C., area.
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