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John Peabody

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
Everyone thought the tall, strange white man was some kind of genius. But to teenage Ernestine De Soto he was a giant pain in the neck, a nosy, "Ichabod Crane-like" character who drew her mother's attention from its rightful place -- on her. John Peabody Harrington studied De Soto's Chumash family for nearly 50 years, pumping her great-grandmother, her grandmother and her mother for the tiniest details of their lives. Everything fascinated him: the Chumash names of places mostly forgotten, of fish no longer caught -- even, to the family's puzzlement, of private parts never discussed in polite company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
Everyone thought the tall, strange white man was some kind of genius. But to teenage Ernestine De Soto he was a giant pain in the neck, a nosy, "Ichabod Crane-like" character who drew her mother's attention from its rightful place -- on her. John Peabody Harrington studied De Soto's Chumash family for nearly 50 years, pumping her great-grandmother, her grandmother and her mother for the tiniest details of their lives. Everything fascinated him: the Chumash names of places mostly forgotten, of fish no longer caught -- even, to the family's puzzlement, of private parts never discussed in polite company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1998 | COLL METCALFE
Noted Chumash storyteller Gilbert Unzuela will host a program at the Strathearn Historical Park and Museum in Simi Valley about the world of Ventura County's earliest residents. Beginning at 2 p.m. Aug. 22, Unzuela will tell stories of these early people and explain how they interpreted the world around them.
NEWS
April 5, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. officer said first tests of a white powder found in thousands of vials near Baghdad indicated that it was not a chemical weapon. Col. John Peabody said that "it does not appear to be a chemical that could be used in a chemical weapons attack." Peabody said most of the powder appeared to be the antidote atropine and another chemical. U.S. forces said they had found boxes containing the vials of powder and a liquid as well as chemical war manuals.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill McCawley has been fascinated by Southern California history since he was a kid growing up in Long Beach in the 1960s, a time when there were still wide open fields waiting to be explored by children hoping to find Indian arrowheads and dinosaur bones. He got his first real glimpse into the history of the area when he took a class at Cal State Long Beach taught by Frank Fenenga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1998
Re: "Smithsonian Scientist Faults Mission Project" (Dec. 24) and "Rare Floor Plan Offers a Blueprint of Mission Life" (Dec. 26): 1. It was, perhaps, premature for Dennis Stanford of the Smithsonian to allow himself to be brought into this dispute between the Mission San Buenaventura and the information furnished him by the archeologist Gary Stickel. In so doing, Stanford puts himself in the thought-provoking position of using the authority of his position at the Smithsonian to find fault with the mission project, based primarily on what might be called the one-sided view of Stickel, who was fired from his job as the archeologist at the mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1990 | GARY GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chumash Indians were the first indigenous people the Spanish encountered in what is now California, historians say, and they were the most advanced in technology, commerce and material prosperity. But hardly anybody bothered to take notes. In 1923, pioneering anthropologist A.L. Kroeber wrote: "There is no group in the state that once held the importance of the Chumash concerning which we know so little."
NATIONAL
January 20, 2010 | By David G. Savage
More evidence emerged Tuesday to suggest that the voracious Asian carp is threatening to reach the Great Lakes, as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reported for the first time finding DNA samples of the carp beyond the locks in the Chicago area. The news came hours after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to intervene and issue an emergency order closing off all the locks that connect Illinois' rivers with Lake Michigan. "We have one sample positive in the Calumet Harbor above the breakwater, so that is in Lake Michigan," Maj. Gen. John Peabody said in a conference call with reporters.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
An explosion Saturday at a U.S.-managed munitions dump that killed at least six Iraqis prompted anti-American protests and sharp criticism from residents. The first explosion occurred at 8 a.m. and could be heard miles away, shattering windows and damaging houses in the modest Zaafaraniyah neighborhood on the southeastern edge of the city. Large blasts continued into the late afternoon. The six who died were members of the same family. At least 25 people were injured, hospital officials said.
NEWS
February 17, 2008 | Juliana Barbassa, Associated Press
The first time Jose Freeman heard his tribe's lost language through the crackle of a 70-year-old recording, he cried. "My ancestors were speaking to me," said Freeman of the sounds captured when American Indians still inhabited California's Salinas Valley. "It was like coming home." Although the last native speaker of Salinan died almost half a century ago, more and more indigenous people are finding their extinct or endangered tongues, one word or song at a time, thanks to a late linguist and some UC Davis scholars who are working to transcribe his life's obsession.
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