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John Pennington

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May 2, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
The Pennington Dance Group won half of the 2005 Lester Horton Dance Awards, given Sunday at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood. Led by John Pennington -- a dancer, choreographer, teacher and former member of the late Bella Lewitzky's modern dance company -- people in the group bearing his name won seven of the awards. Most went to productions and performances of historic modern dance works by Lewitzky and by German modern dancer Harald Kreutzberg, who died in 1968.
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NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
ARLINGTON, Wash. - Fearing more moving earth at the site of Saturday's deadly mudslide, search-and-rescue workers were pulled back Monday afternoon from searching for the dead and missing, officials said. "There are concerns about additional slides in the same area affected Saturday," Snohomish County Sheriff's Department spokeswoman Shari Ireton told reporters. "Ground crews have pulled back, and geologists are on the ground. " But there were still more than 100 responders in the field Monday afternoon, Ireton said, using search dogs, hovercraft, air support and sonar devices to look for survivors and victims in the square mile of deep debris about an hour north of Seattle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
When the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company presents choreography by someone other than its founder-director, that's news. And when this interloper is reportedly a candidate for the newly created position of company co-director, fasten your seat belts. The dance community has yet to learn how Lewitzky, her dancers, staff and board reacted to the premiere of Susan Rose's "Displacements," Saturday at Occidental College.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Matt Pearce
ARLINGTON, Wash. - Danger and uncertainty hang like a pall over the small towns along the Stillaguamish River. The mudslide that tore across State Route 530 - leaving nearly a square mile of debris and slicing a scar in the hillside taller than the Washington Monument - threatened to continue moving Monday. Search-and-rescue teams equipped with sonar, hovercraft and dogs were pulled back from the hardest-hit area for two hours out of fear that they too might become casualties of Saturday's deadly slide.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Watching a talented artist test his or her creative limits can be rewarding even when the results turn out to be unsatisfying or just plain dull. Case in point: the overambitious, intermittently exciting program by the Pennington Dance Group at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center on Friday.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
ARLINGTON, Wash. - Fearing more moving earth at the site of Saturday's deadly mudslide, search-and-rescue workers were pulled back Monday afternoon from searching for the dead and missing, officials said. "There are concerns about additional slides in the same area affected Saturday," Snohomish County Sheriff's Department spokeswoman Shari Ireton told reporters. "Ground crews have pulled back, and geologists are on the ground. " But there were still more than 100 responders in the field Monday afternoon, Ireton said, using search dogs, hovercraft, air support and sonar devices to look for survivors and victims in the square mile of deep debris about an hour north of Seattle.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Matt Pearce
ARLINGTON, Wash. - Danger and uncertainty hang like a pall over the small towns along the Stillaguamish River. The mudslide that tore across State Route 530 - leaving nearly a square mile of debris and slicing a scar in the hillside taller than the Washington Monument - threatened to continue moving Monday. Search-and-rescue teams equipped with sonar, hovercraft and dogs were pulled back from the hardest-hit area for two hours out of fear that they too might become casualties of Saturday's deadly slide.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to the Times
The Sola Contemporary Dance Festival, celebrating its fourth year over the weekend at Torrance's James Armstrong Theatre, featured nine emerging choreographers and 40 dancers in a program of old and new works. The passing parade promised a potent palette but instead blurred into mild pleasantries, several bright voices notwithstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2011 | By Donna Perlmutter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all know what happens when great composers, writers and artists die: Their work lives on. But what about groundbreaking choreographers — say, Martha Graham, José Limon, Merce Cunningham, Antony Tudor, Alvin Ailey, George Balanchine — those creators whose inspiration floats on a flashing moment, an instant image, a looming structure, perhaps never to be recaptured? A question of survival follows. Because, unlike music (written in scores), art (hanging on museum walls) and books (housed in libraries)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | Jennifer Fisher, Special to The Times
When dancer-choreographer John Pennington told friends he was making a dance about the Human Genome Project, they mostly just raised their eyebrows and said, "Good luck." Like Pennington himself, before he launched into a frenzy of reading almost a year ago, most of them knew only that scientists were unraveling the secrets of human genes, that it all had something to do with predicting and curing disease, and that a great deal of hope and controversy surrounded the endeavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2011 | By Donna Perlmutter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all know what happens when great composers, writers and artists die: Their work lives on. But what about groundbreaking choreographers — say, Martha Graham, José Limon, Merce Cunningham, Antony Tudor, Alvin Ailey, George Balanchine — those creators whose inspiration floats on a flashing moment, an instant image, a looming structure, perhaps never to be recaptured? A question of survival follows. Because, unlike music (written in scores), art (hanging on museum walls) and books (housed in libraries)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Watching a talented artist test his or her creative limits can be rewarding even when the results turn out to be unsatisfying or just plain dull. Case in point: the overambitious, intermittently exciting program by the Pennington Dance Group at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
The Pennington Dance Group won half of the 2005 Lester Horton Dance Awards, given Sunday at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood. Led by John Pennington -- a dancer, choreographer, teacher and former member of the late Bella Lewitzky's modern dance company -- people in the group bearing his name won seven of the awards. Most went to productions and performances of historic modern dance works by Lewitzky and by German modern dancer Harald Kreutzberg, who died in 1968.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to the Times
The Sola Contemporary Dance Festival, celebrating its fourth year over the weekend at Torrance's James Armstrong Theatre, featured nine emerging choreographers and 40 dancers in a program of old and new works. The passing parade promised a potent palette but instead blurred into mild pleasantries, several bright voices notwithstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | Jennifer Fisher, Special to The Times
When dancer-choreographer John Pennington told friends he was making a dance about the Human Genome Project, they mostly just raised their eyebrows and said, "Good luck." Like Pennington himself, before he launched into a frenzy of reading almost a year ago, most of them knew only that scientists were unraveling the secrets of human genes, that it all had something to do with predicting and curing disease, and that a great deal of hope and controversy surrounded the endeavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
When the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company presents choreography by someone other than its founder-director, that's news. And when this interloper is reportedly a candidate for the newly created position of company co-director, fasten your seat belts. The dance community has yet to learn how Lewitzky, her dancers, staff and board reacted to the premiere of Susan Rose's "Displacements," Saturday at Occidental College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996 | KELLY DAVID
In honor of the college's new dance major, Moorpark College will host a dance performance tonight featuring artists who helped create the program over the past 15 years. The dancers will include John Pennington of the Bella Lewitzky Company performing Scott Heinzerling's "Isaac Wanted"; L.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1987 | SHELLEY BAUMSTEN
Three familiar works by Bella Lewitzky seen Sunday at McKinney Theatre, Saddleback College, amply demonstrated the breadth of her formalism and the scrupulous dancing of her company. "8 dancers/8 lights" (1985) wrapped movement around vertical neon tubes with some of the economy, if not the austerity, of post-modern minimalism. "Spaces Between" (1974) slung dancers over and under plexiglass platforms in a freewheeling celebration of movement invention.
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