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John Pennington

ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1996 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is no longer news that the 80-year-old doyenne of West Coast modern dance, Bella Lewitzky, is in the twilight year of disbanding her company. In what was billed as the company's final Long Beach performance, her troupe trotted out a quartet of all-too-familiar favorites Sunday at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center on the Cal State L.A. campus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES
The clock is ticking toward the June 1997 deadline that choreographer Bella Lewitzky has set for disbanding her company. But there was no evidence of a dispirited troupe in a program of three familiar works over the weekend at Occidental College's Keck Theater. In fact, five new dancers appeared with five veterans, testifying to the appeal and vitality of Lewitzky, whose work was last seen at the college almost a year ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first engagement since the startling news of its future demise, the Lewitzky Dance Company projected no sense of demoralization. If anything, the troupe looked especially strong and alert over the weekend in the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State Los Angeles. On Saturday, the dancers captured three distinct moods and preoccupations of founder Bella Lewitzky, who announced last Monday that she will disband the company by June, 1997, following a two-year commemoration of her work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2003 | Jennifer Fisher, Special to The Times
On a list of dance territories worth revisiting, the recent experiments of the Jazz Tap Ensemble's Lynn Dally and a handful of border-crossing virtuosos have to be included. Her genre-mixing "Solea," first seen at Highways a few years ago, was bracing again in "Dancing Blues," Dally's hourlong entry in the C.O.L.A. series (showcasing work supported by City of Los Angeles grants) Saturday night at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Showcasing men of feeling and women of action, the second, mostly modern "Dance Kaleidoscope" program of 1993 brought a number of potent statements of sensibility to Cal State Los Angeles on Sunday. Four women's quartets traced the evolution in contemporary dance from artmaking to social priorities, beginning with the basically academic but increasingly exploratory formalism of Patricia Sandback's "Bach Dances." Fluent and tasteful, the choreography needed stronger dancing than it received.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1999 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Because photographs often represent a primary source in the reconstruction of lost choreographies, the relationship between camera and stage is unusually deep and complex for the American Repertory Dance Company, a locally based ensemble founded five years ago as a living archive of early 20th century dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1995 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Call it Dance Kaleidoscope West: the first visit by the annual showcase series to the intimate Strub Theatre at Loyola Marymount University. Besides four previously reviewed offerings, the Sunday performance included one duet and four solos showcasing first-rate dancing and choreography that didn't always clearly express the themes described in the program booklet.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1998 | JENNIFER FISHER
Where else but at a palace of Western culture could you get away with introducing a dance by saying that Greek art "has been and will be the art of all humanity for all time"? Back when Isadora Duncan said it, maybe no one balked, but a little context is in order to explain Greek revivalists these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
That the audience-input aspect of "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" remains giddy fun is no surprise. Rupert Holmes' 1986 Tony-winning adaptation of Charles Dickens' unfinished 1870 novel has an unbeatable asset in our deciding its outcome. What is astounding about the benchmark Sacred Fools revival is its ribald immersion in the Victorian music hall ethos. This registers at first sight of designer Joel Daavid's magnificent, venue-spanning set.
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