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John Philip Sousa

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
For years, the world's largest archive of original compositions and arrangements by John Philip Sousa -- more than four tons of it -- was stuffed into file drawers and cabinets, accessible to only a privileged few. Now, with the 150th anniversary of Sousa's birth today, University of Illinois curator Scott Schwartz is bringing the personal papers, music and other memorabilia from American's best-known bandmaster out of the dark for a monthlong Sousa Sesquicentennial Celebration.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2011 | By Alison Bell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Today, if you wanted to rub shoulders with prominent thinkers, writers and entertainers, you'd probably try to wangle an invitation to one of Arianna Huffington's salons at her Brentwood mansion. In the early 1900s, however, you'd head to the home of Charles Fletcher Lummis in what is now Highland Park. Lummis, a prolific writer, champion of the Southwest and, for a while, Los Angeles' head librarian, played host to some of the biggest movers and shakers of his time, including humorist Will Rogers, naturalist John Muir, attorney Clarence Darrow and composer John Philip Sousa.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What would the Fourth of July be without hot dogs, fireworks and marches by John Philip Sousa? Everyone knows them, hums along to them and taps their feet to their infectious rhythms. But for many people, Sousa remains only a name. Few realize that before Gershwin, Copland or Bernstein, it was Sousa who put American musical efforts on the map at a time when they were regarded as poor cousins to European music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
For years, the world's largest archive of original compositions and arrangements by John Philip Sousa -- more than four tons of it -- was stuffed into file drawers and cabinets, accessible to only a privileged few. Now, with the 150th anniversary of Sousa's birth today, University of Illinois curator Scott Schwartz is bringing the personal papers, music and other memorabilia from American's best-known bandmaster out of the dark for a monthlong Sousa Sesquicentennial Celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998
According to Chris Pasles, John Philip Sousa's biographer thinks that "his impact on American music cannot be underestimated" ("Marching to His Tune," July 2). I think that Pasles' ability to use English words accurately and correctly should not be overestimated. JEFF COHLBERG Long Beach
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | United Press International
The House passed and returned to the Senate for final approval Tuesday a bill declaring John Philip Sousa's rousing "The Stars and Stripes Forever" as the nation's official march. If the Senate approves an amendment to the one-paragraph bill, adding Sousa's name, it will be sent to the White House for President Reagan's signature.
NEWS
May 1, 1995
Malcolm F. Heslip, 96, professor in the UCLA Graduate School of Management who was also an accomplished writer. As an enlisted member of the Navy during World War I, Heslip played the piccolo in John Philip Sousa's Navy Band. Sixty-five years later, Heslip recalled the experience in a monograph, "Nostalgic Happenings in the Three Bands of John Philip Sousa." In 1991, Heslip published his personal memoirs in "My Life and Times Under 16 Presidents."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Hollywood Bowl management originally programmed an evening built around John Philip Sousa to end the season Saturday night, little did they suspect that the timing would be so tragically apt. Never in this Bowlgoer's memory had the national anthem, the Sousa marches, a George M. Cohan medley (a last-minute insert) or even the always-spectacular patriotic fireworks display been cheered with such deeply felt fervor.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
The names of the rich and famous of a bygone era roll casually off Ernst Katz's tongue: * John Philip Sousa. Journalism was Katz's "second love" and, while interning as an obit writer at the Los Angeles Times in 1932, he wrote the final farewell to the bandmaster-composer. Katz, a fan, used to seek Sousa out after his concerts and pester him for advice. "Nobody wrote a march like John Philip Sousa, nobody." * Albert Einstein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Keith Brion prepared for Tuesday's noontime concert at Cal State Fullerton by spraying his hair white, darkening his eyebrows with a black pencil, putting on a braided uniform and slipping on white gloves. Then, with baton in hand, he stepped on the platform as John Philip Sousa, the composer and bandmaster who gained fame earlier this century for such marches as "Semper Fidelis," "El Capitan" and "The Stars and Stripes Forever."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where so many musical revues focus on retrospectives of particular composers or genres, "Tintypes" tackles a more expansive theme: the birth of the modern American spirit, as reflected in popular songs from the turn of the 20th century. Exploring that pivotal era through music was a shrewd choice on the part of Mary Kyte, Mel Marvin and Gary Pearle, who created "Tintypes" in 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Hollywood Bowl management originally programmed an evening built around John Philip Sousa to end the season Saturday night, little did they suspect that the timing would be so tragically apt. Never in this Bowlgoer's memory had the national anthem, the Sousa marches, a George M. Cohan medley (a last-minute insert) or even the always-spectacular patriotic fireworks display been cheered with such deeply felt fervor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2000 | JAMES E. FOWLER
The Fourth of July is the nation's birthday. It is also parades, fireworks, speeches, music, baseball games, picnics and hot dogs all wrapped up in red, white and blue. * The Fourth is the day in 1776 that the American Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, severing the colonies' political ties to Great Britain. Thomas Jefferson wrote the bold statement, and John Hancock's signature is the largest on the page.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998
According to Chris Pasles, John Philip Sousa's biographer thinks that "his impact on American music cannot be underestimated" ("Marching to His Tune," July 2). I think that Pasles' ability to use English words accurately and correctly should not be overestimated. JEFF COHLBERG Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What would the Fourth of July be without hot dogs, fireworks and marches by John Philip Sousa? Everyone knows them, hums along to them and taps their feet to their infectious rhythms. But for many people, Sousa remains only a name. Few realize that before Gershwin, Copland or Bernstein, it was Sousa who put American musical efforts on the map at a time when they were regarded as poor cousins to European music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Australian construction materials giant James Hardie Industries Ltd. said Wednesday it will form a new global operating company and move it to Orange County later this year in a major corporate reorganization and recapitalization. Hardie also said it will seek a New York Stock Exchange listing for shares of the new operating company, to be called James Hardie NV. Hardie Industries, which has had a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2000 | JAMES E. FOWLER
The Fourth of July is the nation's birthday. It is also parades, fireworks, speeches, music, baseball games, picnics and hot dogs all wrapped up in red, white and blue. * The Fourth is the day in 1776 that the American Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, severing the colonies' political ties to Great Britain. Thomas Jefferson wrote the bold statement, and John Hancock's signature is the largest on the page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Keith Brion prepared for Tuesday's noontime concert at Cal State Fullerton by spraying his hair white, darkening his eyebrows with a black pencil, putting on a braided uniform and slipping on white gloves. Then, with baton in hand, he stepped on the platform as John Philip Sousa, the composer and bandmaster who gained fame earlier this century for such marches as "Semper Fidelis," "El Capitan" and "The Stars and Stripes Forever."
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