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John Picard

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January 11, 1998 | Alan Weisman, Contributing editor Alan Weisman's next book, "Gaviotas: A Village to Reinvent the World," will be published this spring by Chelsea Green
Over plates of pasta in Cafe Piccolo in Redondo Beach, two members of the so-called Environmental Dream Team are plotting to temporarily commandeer the Grand Wailea Resort on the island of Maui. The occasion, an annual sales meeting of Atlanta-based Interface Inc., one of the world's largest carpet manufacturers, seems an unlikely target for insurrection, especially since these men have the enthusiastic cooperation of the hotel. The man doing most of the talking is John Picard.
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MAGAZINE
March 15, 1998
How arrogant are we to think we can continue to process natural resources into straws, cups, burger cartons and ketchup packets, only to use them for about an hour, then dump them into a landfill ("The Eco-Wizard," by Alan Weisman, Jan. 11)? This is but one example of our convenience-driven culture gone crazy. But just as we have led the world into this problem, so we should lead the way out. John Picard offers many practical solutions to overconsumption. We should listen. Wayne Hart Long Beach The term eco-wizard, coined for a guy involved in the destruction of the last remaining wetlands so that DreamWorks employees can "stroll" to work and arrange for a baby-sitter over the Internet, gives the word hypocrisy a whole new slant.
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NEWS
April 20, 1995 | JOHN CANALIS
Southern California Gas Co. has opened a building constructed mostly with recycled material. For example, the Energy Resource Center's steel frame is made from weapons that were melted down after being confiscated by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Scraps from plastic gas-company pipes were mixed into the walkway pavement at the main entrance. Outdoor benches were made from melted-down plastic milk containers. "We see the building as a living example of what we would like (businesses)
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1998 | Alan Weisman, Contributing editor Alan Weisman's next book, "Gaviotas: A Village to Reinvent the World," will be published this spring by Chelsea Green
Over plates of pasta in Cafe Piccolo in Redondo Beach, two members of the so-called Environmental Dream Team are plotting to temporarily commandeer the Grand Wailea Resort on the island of Maui. The occasion, an annual sales meeting of Atlanta-based Interface Inc., one of the world's largest carpet manufacturers, seems an unlikely target for insurrection, especially since these men have the enthusiastic cooperation of the hotel. The man doing most of the talking is John Picard.
MAGAZINE
March 15, 1998
How arrogant are we to think we can continue to process natural resources into straws, cups, burger cartons and ketchup packets, only to use them for about an hour, then dump them into a landfill ("The Eco-Wizard," by Alan Weisman, Jan. 11)? This is but one example of our convenience-driven culture gone crazy. But just as we have led the world into this problem, so we should lead the way out. John Picard offers many practical solutions to overconsumption. We should listen. Wayne Hart Long Beach The term eco-wizard, coined for a guy involved in the destruction of the last remaining wetlands so that DreamWorks employees can "stroll" to work and arrange for a baby-sitter over the Internet, gives the word hypocrisy a whole new slant.
REAL ESTATE
July 21, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN
"The housing industry needs a good environmental model," maintains John Picard, who nominated his new recycled steel house. At first glance his campaign seems futile. Who wants a steel house? Last year, according to the National Assn. of Homebuilders, its members built close to a million homes in the United States and 95% were wood framed.
NEWS
November 3, 1985 | KENNETH J. FANUCCHI, Times Staff Writer
'I so loved the greenery. It gave me privacy, protection from vandals, clean air. Now it's gone.' --Annette Forster Annette Forster stood in her nearly barren backyard in an expensive Brentwood neighborhood, pointing to the spots where a fig tree had stood here, an apricot tree there.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Picard, a Los Angeles environmental-technology consultant, travels more than 200,000 miles a year and has perfected his routine. "I turn my phone on as I leave the plane, I hail a cab, get into the back seat and call my voice mail, call my office [and] call home. Then, when I get to my hotel room, I start returning calls. Most of the numbers are logged into my phone book, so I can jog dial. And if the line is busy, I use the 'fast redial' and boom! I'm in."
REAL ESTATE
May 31, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Ted Field, a TV producer and an heir of Chicago department-store magnate Marshall Field, plans to move Monday into the mansion owned for 43 years by silent screen star Harold Lloyd, who died in 1971. By taking occupancy, Field might be putting an end to those rumors that were circulating last November that he planned to sell the 36,000-square-foot home he bought a year ago this month for what many in the community thought was a great deal: $6.5 million.
REAL ESTATE
July 21, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN
Although building an environmental house demands a lot of industry research, it doesn't require any super science. "All this information is out there," said John Picard. "I found that people involved in the environmental industries are dying to help--they really want to get the word out." Jeanne Byrne, senior researcher with the Washington, D.C.-based Safe Energy Communications Council, agrees. "This (Picard) house is great because it shows what can be done," she says.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | JOHN CANALIS
Southern California Gas Co. has opened a building constructed mostly with recycled material. For example, the Energy Resource Center's steel frame is made from weapons that were melted down after being confiscated by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Scraps from plastic gas-company pipes were mixed into the walkway pavement at the main entrance. Outdoor benches were made from melted-down plastic milk containers. "We see the building as a living example of what we would like (businesses)
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the people at Herman Miller talk about the workplace of the future, they don't use terms like "desk" or "filing cabinet" or "cubicle." And they've left far behind such onetime status symbols as the monster mahogany roll-top or the Bigelow carpet on the floor. Even the coveted "corner office with the window" is becoming a relic of the Industrial Age. They prefer "action office panels" or "ethospace frames" or "liaison cabinet systems."
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