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WORLD
May 30, 2007 | James Gerstenzang and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
President Bush's decision Tuesday to exert new pressure on Sudan to end the violence in Darfur may have a limited effect because many of the people and businesses he targeted already are getting around existing sanctions, according to experts and business officials. Bush's measures also exempted some of the biggest players in Sudan's economy, particularly Chinese oil interests and Sudanese firms that supply raw materials that are important to influential U.S. industries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | TINA DAUNT
THE Los Angeles Business Journal published its annual list of Los Angeles -- and Hollywood's -- richest entrepreneurs this week, reminding everyone once again of why national politicians treat the ZIP Codes west of La Cienega Boulevard like their home equity line. The list was much the same as it has been in recent years -- that is, dominated by people with ties to Hollywood.
WORLD
September 4, 2002 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States urged Sudan on Tuesday to resume much-heralded peace talks, even as the African nation's leader ordered his generals to launch an offensive against rebels who have seized a key garrison town. President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir broke off the talks this week after the main guerrilla group, the Sudan People's Liberation Army, captured the southern town of Torit, about 70 miles southeast of the Nile River port of Juba.
WORLD
September 6, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The American presidential race and a genocide investigation by the International Criminal Court are propelling Sudanese officials to renew efforts to strike a deal with the U.S. aimed at normalizing relations and improving stability in the volatile Darfur region. Many in the Khartoum government fear frosty U.S.-Sudanese relations could worsen under the next U.S. president. Sen. Joe Biden, the Democratic vice presidential candidate, has called for American military intervention in Darfur.
WORLD
August 17, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
For most of her recent African tour, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sounded much like any visiting foreign official, male or female. Except in Congo. When Clinton ignored security advice and flew to Goma, in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo, her focus on the region's rape crisis resonated with some of the continent's most powerless people: women. It wasn't just that she was the first top-level American official to go to the epicenter of one of the world's deadliest wars, nor even the U.S. aid money she promised.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2009 | TINA DAUNT
Bono has a well-deserved reputation for speaking out on injustice, so imagine his surprise Tuesday when the nation's justices spoke out against him. Justice Antonin Scalia -- the go-to writer when the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative majority wants to punch up the judicial dialogue -- counted U2's lead singer among "the foul-mouthed glitteratae from Hollywood."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Basketball all-star Tracy McGrady certainly enjoys a good life. "Am I spoiled?" he asks. "Yes, I'm spoiled." McGrady's first paycheck came from Adidas in a $500,000 endorsement deal, and his first job was playing in the NBA. The Houston Rockets guard/forward lives in a mansion, has no shortage of jewelry and clothes, and flies on private planes. Unlike so many professional athletes, though, McGrady chose to leave all such luxuries behind and see firsthand how the world's least fortunate survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2007 | TINA DAUNT
THE dinner at a chic rambling apartment along the grounds of the Villa Borghese (the Eternal City's eternal equivalent of Beverly Hills) started at 9:45 p.m., early by Italian standards. The hosts -- two Californians spending a year in Rome -- knew their guests had a busy day ahead.
WORLD
February 24, 2006 | Maggie Farley and Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writers
Three top Sudanese officials, including one regarded as a key U.S.ally in the war on terrorism, are under consideration for sanctions over the conflict in Darfur, according to a confidential U.N. document. The list of 17 people includes Salah Abdallah Gosh, the Sudanese security and intelligence chief who has been a valuable counter-terrorism asset to the United States. The Bush administration has reportedly pushed to keep his name off the list.
WORLD
November 2, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
In a sad, singsong voice, Fatima Juma tells how she lost everything. Her story is like thousands of others in Darfur. They came on camels and horses, she says. Running, she looked back and saw the village ablaze. She never saw the faces of the attackers but calls them the "janjaweed."
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