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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2009 | TINA DAUNT
If Hollywood were to give out grades for how President Obama is doing on issues that matter most to liberal activists here, he would get -- at best -- an incomplete. "The pace of change has begun to matter to Hollywood," said Joel Flatow , who heads the Recording Industry Assn. of America's West Coast office. And that pace, so far, may not be quick enough on the key issues of Darfur, the environment, stem cell research, gay rights, and wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. So think of this as the industry's progress report on the new president.
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NEWS
March 13, 2002 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As vote-counting in Zimbabwe's bitterly contested presidential election got underway Tuesday, allegations of misconduct continued to undermine the credibility of the poll. Opposition politicians, local election observers and foreign political analysts charged that the government of longtime President Robert Mugabe had used every trick in the book to try to maintain its grip on power, indicating that no matter what the outcome, it would never concede defeat.
WORLD
November 7, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Militants seize an entire village in southern Darfur. Armed marauders to the north loot homes and ranches. A group of international observers is kidnapped. They sound like the same tragic stories that have emerged from western Sudan since 2003. But these latest attacks came not from the reputedly government-backed militias known as janjaweed, but instead from Darfur's own rebel groups, who many in the restive region have long viewed as freedom fighters battling oppression.
WORLD
February 4, 2008 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
As rebels in Chad fought for a second day to take control of the nation's capital, analysts said Sunday that the outcome of the attempted coup could have far-reaching implications for the Darfur conflict in neighboring Sudan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Basketball all-star Tracy McGrady certainly enjoys a good life. "Am I spoiled?" he asks. "Yes, I'm spoiled." McGrady's first paycheck came from Adidas in a $500,000 endorsement deal, and his first job was playing in the NBA. The Houston Rockets guard/forward lives in a mansion, has no shortage of jewelry and clothes, and flies on private planes. Unlike so many professional athletes, though, McGrady chose to leave all such luxuries behind and see firsthand how the world's least fortunate survive.
WORLD
May 30, 2007 | James Gerstenzang and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
President Bush's decision Tuesday to exert new pressure on Sudan to end the violence in Darfur may have a limited effect because many of the people and businesses he targeted already are getting around existing sanctions, according to experts and business officials. Bush's measures also exempted some of the biggest players in Sudan's economy, particularly Chinese oil interests and Sudanese firms that supply raw materials that are important to influential U.S. industries.
WORLD
August 17, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
For most of her recent African tour, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sounded much like any visiting foreign official, male or female. Except in Congo. When Clinton ignored security advice and flew to Goma, in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo, her focus on the region's rape crisis resonated with some of the continent's most powerless people: women. It wasn't just that she was the first top-level American official to go to the epicenter of one of the world's deadliest wars, nor even the U.S. aid money she promised.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2009 | TINA DAUNT
Bono has a well-deserved reputation for speaking out on injustice, so imagine his surprise Tuesday when the nation's justices spoke out against him. Justice Antonin Scalia -- the go-to writer when the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative majority wants to punch up the judicial dialogue -- counted U2's lead singer among "the foul-mouthed glitteratae from Hollywood."
BUSINESS
April 11, 2007 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
As a former accountant and stockbroker, Father Paul Spellman knows money talks. So when he found out last month that his retirement funds could be contributing to bloodshed in Sudan, he decided to send a message. His target: Fidelity Investments, which manages the retirement plan for the 350 priests in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and is one of the leading U.S. shareholders in PetroChina Co., part of a company involved in one of Sudan's largest oil projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER THORNE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A group of 58 U.S. senators is asking the Bush administration to approve arming National Guard troops assigned to security detail along the nation's borders. More than 1,700 National Guardsmen have been called up to staff crossings in states along the Canadian and Mexican borders. While their counterparts who were called up to help protect the nation's airports are allowed to carry firearms, those helping protect the borders are not.
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