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John R Galvin

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February 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The commander of U.S. forces in Europe said Wednesday that he opposes President Bush's decision to reduce U.S. troop strength there to 225,000 on grounds that more soldiers are needed to carry out the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's established defense strategy. Army Gen. John R. Galvin told the Senate Armed Services Committee that he was consulted about the Bush troop proposal only "a few days" before the President announced it during last week's State of the Union address.
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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | Associated Press
Two NATO generals arrived Sunday in the first visit to the Soviet Union by high-ranking military officials of the Western alliance. U.S. Gen. John R. Galvin, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's supreme military commander in Europe, and Norwegian Gen. Vigleik Eide, chairman of the alliance's military committee, will hold several days of talks with government and military officials.
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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | Associated Press
Two NATO generals arrived Sunday in the first visit to the Soviet Union by high-ranking military officials of the Western alliance. U.S. Gen. John R. Galvin, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's supreme military commander in Europe, and Norwegian Gen. Vigleik Eide, chairman of the alliance's military committee, will hold several days of talks with government and military officials.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While European leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization grope for a new strategy in the post-Cold War period, the alliance's military commander, Gen. John R. Galvin, is providing some guidelines for such a doctrine. At a recent seminar of diplomats, soldiers and academics at the Konrad Adenauer Foundation in this Bonn suburb, Galvin spelled out his vision of a new, slimmed-down NATO force for the years to come. The white-haired, four-star U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1987
Gen. Bernard W. Rogers, the retiring NATO commander, passed the U.S. European Command to his successor, Gen. John R. Galvin, with a warning against the Kremlin's "seductive rhetoric" on arms control. "We have yet to see any reduction in Soviet military capabilities or any modifications in the expansionist Soviet policy," Rogers said in a ceremony in Stuttgart, West Germany. Galvin automatically becomes supreme commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan's nomination of Gen. John R. Galvin to succeed Gen. Bernard W. Rogers as the top military commander in Europe was accepted Thursday by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Galvin, 57, known for his backing of Reagan's anti-Communist policies and now chief of the U.S. Southern Command in Panama, will take over as the supreme allied commander in Europe when Rogers, 65, steps down at the end of June. The post is always occupied by an American, appointed by the U.S. President.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Gen. John R. Galvin, commander of North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces, issued surprisingly strong criticism of some Western leaders Monday, accusing them of failing to warn their citizens that the Soviet military threat remains serious. Addressing a meeting in Hamburg, West Germany, of members of parliaments from NATO countries, Galvin said the Kremlin's arms posture is unchanged despite Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While European leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization grope for a new strategy in the post-Cold War period, the alliance's military commander, Gen. John R. Galvin, is providing some guidelines for such a doctrine. At a recent seminar of diplomats, soldiers and academics at the Konrad Adenauer Foundation in this Bonn suburb, Galvin spelled out his vision of a new, slimmed-down NATO force for the years to come. The white-haired, four-star U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | Associated Press
U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Michael J. Dugan, 51, will succeed retiring Air Force Gen. William L. Kirk as commander of allied air forces in Central Europe in April, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization announced Thursday. Dugan, 51, will get the rank of general, said U.S. Gen. John R. Galvin, NATO's supreme allied commander in Europe.
NEWS
November 25, 1986
Gen. John R. Galvin, commander of the U.S. Southern Command in Panama, which controls U.S. forces in Latin America, will replace Gen. Bernard W. Rogers as commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Europe next summer, Pentagon sources said. Rogers is retiring. Galvin's replacement has not been named. In another major shift, Gen. Robert T. Herres, commander of the Air Force Space Command, is to become the nation's second highest-ranking officer as vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in January.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The commander of U.S. forces in Europe said Wednesday that he opposes President Bush's decision to reduce U.S. troop strength there to 225,000 on grounds that more soldiers are needed to carry out the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's established defense strategy. Army Gen. John R. Galvin told the Senate Armed Services Committee that he was consulted about the Bush troop proposal only "a few days" before the President announced it during last week's State of the Union address.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Gen. John R. Galvin, commander of North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces, issued surprisingly strong criticism of some Western leaders Monday, accusing them of failing to warn their citizens that the Soviet military threat remains serious. Addressing a meeting in Hamburg, West Germany, of members of parliaments from NATO countries, Galvin said the Kremlin's arms posture is unchanged despite Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
June 26, 1987
Gen. Bernard W. Rogers, the retiring NATO commander, passed the U.S. European Command to his successor, Gen. John R. Galvin, with a warning against the Kremlin's "seductive rhetoric" on arms control. "We have yet to see any reduction in Soviet military capabilities or any modifications in the expansionist Soviet policy," Rogers said in a ceremony in Stuttgart, West Germany. Galvin automatically becomes supreme commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan's nomination of Gen. John R. Galvin to succeed Gen. Bernard W. Rogers as the top military commander in Europe was accepted Thursday by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Galvin, 57, known for his backing of Reagan's anti-Communist policies and now chief of the U.S. Southern Command in Panama, will take over as the supreme allied commander in Europe when Rogers, 65, steps down at the end of June. The post is always occupied by an American, appointed by the U.S. President.
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