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John R Schmidt

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NEWS
May 13, 1994 | Associated Press
John R. Schmidt, a Chicago lawyer who specializes in corporate mergers and who served as chief U.S. negotiator in world trade talks, will be nominated for the No. 3 post at the Justice Department. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno announced Thursday that President Clinton had picked Schmidt, an early fund-raiser for his presidential campaign, as associate attorney general.
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NEWS
May 13, 1994 | Associated Press
John R. Schmidt, a Chicago lawyer who specializes in corporate mergers and who served as chief U.S. negotiator in world trade talks, will be nominated for the No. 3 post at the Justice Department. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno announced Thursday that President Clinton had picked Schmidt, an early fund-raiser for his presidential campaign, as associate attorney general.
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NEWS
July 24, 1994 | Associated Press
The Senate has confirmed John R. Schmidt as the Justice Department's No. 3 official. The Chicago lawyer replaces Webster Hubbell, a friend of President Clinton and former law partner of Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Solicitor General Drew S. Days III, the Clinton administration's top courtroom lawyer, is planning to leave his post this summer to return to the Yale Law School, The Times learned Wednesday. A soft-spoken former civil rights attorney, Days has had a rough tenure representing the government before the conservative-leaning Supreme Court.
NEWS
February 11, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clinton Administration officials on Friday denounced as dangerous and costly a Republican proposal that would force government agencies to compensate property owners whose land is devalued by federal regulations. The compensation proposal, part of the House GOP's "contract with America" campaign manifesto, would require the federal government to pay compensation any time a regulation leads to reduction in the value of property by 10% or more.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to a sensitive political issue, Justice Department officials said Thursday that they will expedite payment of $33.4 million to California, and smaller amounts to six other states to help cover the costs of imprisoning illegal immigrants who have violated criminal laws. Atty. Gen.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | JESSE KATZ and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fire gutted a racially mixed church in this remote prairie town Thursday morning, the latest in a string of suspicious blazes this year that have charred the sanctuaries of more than 30 black congregations across the South. Federal investigators, who spent most of the day sifting through the remains of Enid's First Missionary Baptist Church, declined to comment on the cause of the fire or characterize it as the work of an arsonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
With his wistful, boyish middle-aged looks, William H. Macy is perfect casting for a loser like "The Cooler's" Bernie Lootz. He's a luckless ex-gambler who is paying off a massive indebtedness to the Golden Shangri-La Casino by hanging around the tables, cooling off winning streaks by his sheer hangdog presence. "The Cooler," however, is a beguiling Las Vegas romantic fable, a fairy tale really, that has a different destiny in store for Bernie.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, reacting to a spate of reports that Americans have been killed and tortured by Guatemalan police and army death squads, on Thursday ordered a little-known intelligence watchdog committee to find out if the CIA, the American Embassy or any other U.S. agency was implicated in committing the crimes or in covering them up. White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry said that Clinton ordered the Intelligence Oversight Board to conduct a thorough investigation of the allegations.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
In Washington, obscurity is never a measure of insignificance. Usually the opposite is true: The most important things are often the most arcane. (When House Speaker Newt Gingrich's defenders insisted that he violated only an "arcane" corner of the tax law, they forgot this fundamental rule.) The front pages are filled with the heat and light of choreographed political conflict; but decisions that affect millions are often recorded only deep in the clotted gray swamp of the Federal Register.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a year when the flames of racial antagonism have flared with sometimes frightening intensity, affirmative action has proven to be surprisingly soggy tinder. Last spring, many supporters of affirmative action worried that the conservative surge that carried the GOP to power in Congress in 1994 might inexorably sweep away programs built to expand opportunities for women and minorities. But the blitzkrieg never occurred.
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