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John R Silber

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November 7, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outspoken Democrat John R. Silber late Tuesday night conceded a taut battle for the Massachusetts governorship to Republican William F. Weld. With 79% of the precincts reporting, Weld had 51% of the vote, with Silber holding 49%. An estimated 75% of registered voters cast ballots in this election, a record for a non-presidential year. Weld, 45, is a former U.S. attorney who served as an assistant attorney general in the Ronald Reagan Administration.
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NEWS
November 7, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outspoken Democrat John R. Silber late Tuesday night conceded a taut battle for the Massachusetts governorship to Republican William F. Weld. With 79% of the precincts reporting, Weld had 51% of the vote, with Silber holding 49%. An estimated 75% of registered voters cast ballots in this election, a record for a non-presidential year. Weld, 45, is a former U.S. attorney who served as an assistant attorney general in the Ronald Reagan Administration.
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NEWS
October 24, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Gov. Michael S. Dukakis is the fading sun of Massachusetts politics, John R. Silber and William F. Weld, the men vying to replace him, are competing to be Pluto, as distant a point from him as possible. Democrat Silber, 64, a philosopher on leave as president of Boston University, and Republican Weld, 45, a former U.S.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Gov. Michael S. Dukakis is the fading sun of Massachusetts politics, John R. Silber and William F. Weld, the men vying to replace him, are competing to be Pluto, as distant a point from him as possible. Democrat Silber, 64, a philosopher on leave as president of Boston University, and Republican Weld, 45, a former U.S.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the tradition of the colony that started the American Revolution, primary election voters in Massachusetts have sent out a message: the political status quo, at least here, is no more. Turning out in near-record numbers, voters on Tuesday effectively axed almost anyone associated with the established order. The two nominees who now will contest for the governor's office in November--Democrat John R. Silber and Republican William F.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a powerful rejection of the state's political Establishment, Massachusetts voters Tuesday chose two outsiders, Democrat John R. Silber, and Republican William F. Weld to run for governor in November. With 75% of the precincts counted, Silber, president of Boston University, had 53% of the vote, against 44% for former state Atty. Gen. Francis X. Bellotti. Lt. Gov. Evelyn Murphy, who withdrew from the race earlier, scored 3% of the vote.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Boston University President John R. Silber opens his mouth in public these days, television cameras start rolling and reporters scoot a little closer to the edges of their seats. Considering that Silber has been a professional politician for only five weeks, and faces what appear to be almost insurmountable odds in his quest to become governor, it might seem a dream come true to have the news media hanging onto every utterance.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yes, there is a God of Standards, and when it comes to what's tolerated in public speech, he has been much abused in the past few weeks. First, professional curmudgeon Andy Rooney is censored by his own network after he's accused of (but denies) raising the specter of eugenics while talking about poor blacks. Later, Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D.-N.Y.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The widow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. testified that the president of Boston University turned hostile when she proposed that the school return her husband's papers. Coretta Scott King said John R. Silber would not discuss the issue during a 1985 meeting, instead demanding she send the university all other King-related documents it did not already hold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1990
The best thing that can be said about Louisiana's primary is that David Duke lost. At least Americans have been spared the disgrace of seating a neo-Nazi, racist anti-Semite in the U.S. Senate. What they have not been spared is the soul-searching that ought to flow from the realization of how near a thing this was. Pre-election polls put the former Ku Klux Klan leader's support at about 25%. In the end, he received 44% of the vote.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the tradition of the colony that started the American Revolution, primary election voters in Massachusetts have sent out a message: the political status quo, at least here, is no more. Turning out in near-record numbers, voters on Tuesday effectively axed almost anyone associated with the established order. The two nominees who now will contest for the governor's office in November--Democrat John R. Silber and Republican William F.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a powerful rejection of the state's political Establishment, Massachusetts voters Tuesday chose two outsiders, Democrat John R. Silber, and Republican William F. Weld to run for governor in November. With 75% of the precincts counted, Silber, president of Boston University, had 53% of the vote, against 44% for former state Atty. Gen. Francis X. Bellotti. Lt. Gov. Evelyn Murphy, who withdrew from the race earlier, scored 3% of the vote.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yes, there is a God of Standards, and when it comes to what's tolerated in public speech, he has been much abused in the past few weeks. First, professional curmudgeon Andy Rooney is censored by his own network after he's accused of (but denies) raising the specter of eugenics while talking about poor blacks. Later, Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D.-N.Y.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Boston University President John R. Silber opens his mouth in public these days, television cameras start rolling and reporters scoot a little closer to the edges of their seats. Considering that Silber has been a professional politician for only five weeks, and faces what appear to be almost insurmountable odds in his quest to become governor, it might seem a dream come true to have the news media hanging onto every utterance.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Some voters are pushing "none of the above" as a better option in a year when they think the ballot choices are not suited for public office. The none-of-the-above (NOTA) option has been listed on Nevada ballots since 1976--and won six times. The idea has attracted attention in Massachusetts, especially from liberals who are scratching their heads over the choices to replace Gov. Michael S. Dukakis--Democrat John R. Silber and Republican William F. Weld.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
A Boston University dean accused of plagiarism resigned Friday, saying the misdeed was inadvertent and that he "must have slipped into a black hole." H. Joachim Maitre, dean of the College of Communication since 1987, offered his resignation in a letter to school President John R. Silber, who said he was accepting the resignation "with deep regret." While he praised Maitre's work, Silber said it is the duty of "all responsible scholars and writers to credit their sources."
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