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John Randolph

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NEWS
March 27, 1992
The City College of New York Alumni Assn. of Southern California will honor character actor John Randolph, a CCNY alumnus, at its annual dinner reunion at the Viscount Hotel, 9750 Airport Blvd., Los Angeles, on Saturday. The cost is $35. Randolph, who won a Tony for his work in Neil Simon's "Broadway Bound," starred most recently in the TV comedy series "Grand." His film work includes "Prizzi's Honor," in which he played Jack Nicholson's father.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Laurence Olivier was among the world's most accomplished actors, but he wasn't a big enough star. That was the consensus of Paramount honchos in 1965, when director John Frankenheimer was planning his eighth feature, the science fiction thriller "Seconds," and wanted the esteemed Brit in the lead role. What might at first have seemed like executive-suite folly led to an inspired instance of counterintuitive casting: Rock Hudson, Hollywood's reigning romantic-comedy dreamboat, in what is unquestionably one of the darkest studio movies ever made.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
If tributes tend to reflect the people they are about, John Randolph can't complain. The luncheon Sunday for the Tony award-winning actor ("Broadway Bound") and social and union activist had elements rarely found in such events: spontaneity, brevity, wit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2011
John Randolph Hearst Jr. Grandson and heir of William Randolph Hearst John Randolph Hearst Jr., 77, a grandson of media titan William Randolph Hearst and heir to the family fortune, died Friday in New York, Hearst Corp. said in a statement. The cause was not disclosed. Nicknamed "Bunky," Hearst spent most of his career at the company his grandfather founded. Besides serving on the board, he was a trustee of the Hearst Family Trust and a director of the Hearst Foundations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
John Randolph, a Tony Award-winning stage, screen and television character actor and a union and social activist who was blacklisted during the McCarthy era, has died. He was 88. Randolph, who continued acting until about four years ago, died of natural causes Tuesday at his home in Hollywood, according to his family. He was not a household name, but the balding actor was a familiar face in movies and on television, where he often played authority figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2004
A memorial celebration of the life of actor John Randolph, who died Feb. 24 at the age of 88, will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Canon Theater, 209 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills. A memorial service for Cecily Adams will be held at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the Directors Guild, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. Adams, an actress, teacher and casting director died of lung cancer March 3. She was 46.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Maybe you saw it on television. John Randolph was the guy at the White House last winter hugging Mikhail Gorbachev. "It didn't feel like nerve," the actor recalled. "I really meant it. I couldn't conceive of hugging Reagan, because I violently disagree with his obsession to wipe out Nicaragua--or saying that what's going on in South Africa is just 'tribal.' But whatever I feel about Reagan as President, what happened at that summit was a tremendous step for mankind. A first step.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Laurence Olivier was among the world's most accomplished actors, but he wasn't a big enough star. That was the consensus of Paramount honchos in 1965, when director John Frankenheimer was planning his eighth feature, the science fiction thriller "Seconds," and wanted the esteemed Brit in the lead role. What might at first have seemed like executive-suite folly led to an inspired instance of counterintuitive casting: Rock Hudson, Hollywood's reigning romantic-comedy dreamboat, in what is unquestionably one of the darkest studio movies ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
So actor John Randolph refused to hug President Reagan because that would sanction Reagan's Nicaragua policy ("John Randolph: An Actor's Life Overlaps Art, Activism," by Janice Arkatov, March 12). But he had no qualms about hugging Mikhail Gorbachev and sanctioning the Soviet slave labor camps, the Berlin Wall, the invasion of Afghanistan, the persecution of dissidents--to say nothing of 70 years of systematic oppression, murder and imperialism. I don't know what's more revolting: Randolph's callousness toward human life and liberty or the press portraying him as an "idealist" and "humanitarian."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Change Upon Change: It looks as if Robert Mandan will replace an ailing John Randolph as the old man in "Prelude to a Kiss," opening at La Mirada Theatre later this month. Randolph himself had been a replacement for the initially announced Tom Poston, who is on tour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2004
A memorial celebration of the life of actor John Randolph, who died Feb. 24 at the age of 88, will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Canon Theater, 209 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills. A memorial service for Cecily Adams will be held at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the Directors Guild, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. Adams, an actress, teacher and casting director died of lung cancer March 3. She was 46.
OPINION
March 1, 2004
In the 1950s, I was fortunate to be in a play with John Randolph (obituary, Feb. 27). He had been blacklisted but was able to work in the theater. Our show played in Washington, D.C., for several weeks. During that time, he took several of us younger actors on educational tours of what America was all about. At the National Archives, he showed us and spoke in detail about the Bill of Rights, the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, and most important, what they meant in the formation of our country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
John Randolph, a Tony Award-winning stage, screen and television character actor and a union and social activist who was blacklisted during the McCarthy era, has died. He was 88. Randolph, who continued acting until about four years ago, died of natural causes Tuesday at his home in Hollywood, according to his family. He was not a household name, but the balding actor was a familiar face in movies and on television, where he often played authority figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. FitzRandolph, who over a quarter-century as teacher and dean led drives for accreditation, relocation and growth of Whittier Law School, has died at 65. FitzRandolph died Thursday in Laguna Hills of cancer, campus officials said. "For many people," said the law school's interim dean, Frederick G. Slabach, "John was Whittier Law School." FitzRandolph joined the faculty in 1976, a year after the school was founded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2000
Open mikes and subliminal "rats" are no substitutes for good, old American name-calling, for example: Charles Lee on George Washington: "A dark designing sordid ambitious vain proud arrogant and vindictive knave." John Randolph on Henry Clay: "So brilliant! So corrupt! Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight, he shines and stinks." William McAdoo on Warren Harding's speeches: "An army of pompous phrases moving over the landscape in search of an idea." Barry Goldwater on Lyndon Johnson: "He wants so much power, the Democrats don't know whether to vote him in or plug him in."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994
I am extremely puzzled by John Randolph's statement in his May 2 Counterpunch that his 1966 film "Seconds" was the first major film to be shot in black-and-white since the advent of color films ("A Few Thoughts on Rock Hudson and Another Man Named John . . ."). The "advent" of color dates to the late '30s, with such classics as "Snow White," "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone With the Wind." But I suppose 1955 is as good a year as any to consider the turning point when virtually all films were shot in color.
NEWS
April 21, 1985
Charles Hillinger's article about West Virginia has traveled east to these hills and hollers and I wanted to write and compliment him and his positive approach. As I told him when he was here, we have had some terrible stuff written about us and so I am happy that your article is honest. JOHN RANDOLPH Fort New Salem Salem, W. Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2000
Open mikes and subliminal "rats" are no substitutes for good, old American name-calling, for example: Charles Lee on George Washington: "A dark designing sordid ambitious vain proud arrogant and vindictive knave." John Randolph on Henry Clay: "So brilliant! So corrupt! Like a rotten mackerel in the moonlight, he shines and stinks." William McAdoo on Warren Harding's speeches: "An army of pompous phrases moving over the landscape in search of an idea." Barry Goldwater on Lyndon Johnson: "He wants so much power, the Democrats don't know whether to vote him in or plug him in."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1994 | QUENDRITH JOHNSON
Scenario: An evil half-brother angles to switch identities with--then murder--his semblance in order to escape suspicion for their father's murder. The twist? Although the characters in the story perform as if the two family members are interchangeable, one supposedly "identical" brother is white, the other black. Welcome to "Suture," a lush black-and-white, cinematic labyrinth created by first-time filmmakers Scott McGehee and David Siegel, who wrote, directed and produced the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1993 | JOHN RANDOLPH, Randolph is frequently seen on stage, television and in films. and
In her Counterpunch article, "Casting With More Chutzpah Might Help" (Calendar, Sept. 6), Annie Korzen complained of writers, directors and producers who "white wash" the casting of Jewish characters by excluding members of a specific group from playing their own kind. She specifically cited the casting of Arthur Miller's "The American Clock" on TNT in which members of the Baumler family were portrayed by Mary McDonnell, Eddie Bracken, Loren Dean and me.
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