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NEWS
June 29, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance--or even after a longer look--John Redwood would seem an unlikely candidate to become leader of Britain's Conservative Party, an ascension that would mean he would first have to unseat Prime Minister John Major.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John Henry Redwood, an actor with a deep baritone voice and a football player's build who was especially known for his roles in August Wilson's plays, died June 17 at home in south Philadelphia of heart disease. He was 60. Redwood -- who also wrote several popular plays of his own, including "The Old Settler," which was made into a PBS television film in 2001 -- started his acting career in New York in the 1970s while also studying to be a Protestant minister.
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NEWS
June 27, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cabinet Minister John Redwood resigned his post Monday as Welsh secretary to challenge Prime Minister John Major for leadership of the Conservative Party--and the British government. Redwood, 44, announced he will run against Major in the leadership election July 4, which Major moved up from November in a gamble to establish his authority among the squabbling Tories.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Imagine August Wilson writing for TV, and you'll get a sense of "The Old Settler," John Henry Redwood's tale set in 1943 of two middle-aged sisters who take a handsome young border into their Harlem apartment. The young man has trekked to Harlem in search of a lost love, but he finds himself drawn to one of the sisters. The play strives to be an intricate drama of sexual attraction, a depiction of racial tension in the world outside, and a broad comedy that is clearly a cousin to sitcom.
NEWS
July 4, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Major's future as Britain's prime minister hinges on today's vote for the Conservative Party leadership, with success requiring not just a simple majority but a large enough margin to satisfy party rules--with some to spare. As of late Monday, his fate was in the balance, with no clear result emerging among the many polls and canvasses of the 329 Tory members of Parliament eligible to vote.
NEWS
July 5, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister John Major was reelected Conservative Party leader Tuesday in a convincing vote of confidence that allowed him to remain head of the British government. Major won the support of two-thirds of the 329 Conservative members of Parliament eligible to vote, prevailing over his challenger, right-wing former Cabinet member John Redwood. Soon after the balloting, Major appeared outside No. 10 Downing St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
John Henry Redwood, an actor with a deep baritone voice and a football player's build who was especially known for his roles in August Wilson's plays, died June 17 at home in south Philadelphia of heart disease. He was 60. Redwood -- who also wrote several popular plays of his own, including "The Old Settler," which was made into a PBS television film in 2001 -- started his acting career in New York in the 1970s while also studying to be a Protestant minister.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Imagine August Wilson writing for TV, and you'll get a sense of "The Old Settler," John Henry Redwood's tale set in 1943 of two middle-aged sisters who take a handsome young border into their Harlem apartment. The young man has trekked to Harlem in search of a lost love, but he finds himself drawn to one of the sisters. The play strives to be an intricate drama of sexual attraction, a depiction of racial tension in the world outside, and a broad comedy that is clearly a cousin to sitcom.
NEWS
July 11, 1995
British Prime Minister John Major, the son of a circus acrobat, did a fair turn on the political high wire last week, turning back a challenge from within his own party. The Conservatives, or Tories, do not have to face a general election against the resurgent Labor Party until spring of 1997 at the latest, and getting them in order was the goal of the steady but somewhat colorless, 52-year-old Major. Emerging from his offices at 10 Downing St.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's divided Conservatives deadlocked again Tuesday in their search for a new leader to repair the ravages of a disastrous election and build an effective opposition to Prime Minister Tony Blair of the Labor Party. Kenneth Clarke, the former finance minister, and moderate William Hague, a former Cabinet secretary for Wales, ran neck and neck in a three-man race, but both fell short of the required majority. A Clarke-Hague face-off is scheduled for Thursday. Hague is the favorite.
NEWS
July 5, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister John Major was reelected Conservative Party leader Tuesday in a convincing vote of confidence that allowed him to remain head of the British government. Major won the support of two-thirds of the 329 Conservative members of Parliament eligible to vote, prevailing over his challenger, right-wing former Cabinet member John Redwood. Soon after the balloting, Major appeared outside No. 10 Downing St.
NEWS
July 4, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Major's future as Britain's prime minister hinges on today's vote for the Conservative Party leadership, with success requiring not just a simple majority but a large enough margin to satisfy party rules--with some to spare. As of late Monday, his fate was in the balance, with no clear result emerging among the many polls and canvasses of the 329 Tory members of Parliament eligible to vote.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance--or even after a longer look--John Redwood would seem an unlikely candidate to become leader of Britain's Conservative Party, an ascension that would mean he would first have to unseat Prime Minister John Major.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cabinet Minister John Redwood resigned his post Monday as Welsh secretary to challenge Prime Minister John Major for leadership of the Conservative Party--and the British government. Redwood, 44, announced he will run against Major in the leadership election July 4, which Major moved up from November in a gamble to establish his authority among the squabbling Tories.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's Conservative Party, one of the most enduring and successful political movements in the democratic world, on Tuesday began a long and uncertain road back from electoral defeat, internal division and a reputation tarnished by scandal. Favorite Kenneth Clarke led a five-man race to elect a party leader as successor to the defeated John Major but fell far short of victory in first-round balloting.
NEWS
July 6, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly reelected as Conservative Party leader, Prime Minister John Major moved quickly Wednesday to consolidate his authority with a sweeping overhaul of his Cabinet. He appointed Trade Minister Michael Heseltine to the new post of deputy prime minister, where the pro-Europe veteran is expected to play a leading role in shaping party policy in the run-up to the next national election.
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