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John Rhodehamel

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April 22, 2001 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES CULTURE CORRESPONDENT
Aristocratic by temperament, but democratic by conviction; instinctually conservative, but intellectually audacious. The attributes so frequently applied to the American republic's founders might be used with equal justice to describe the Huntington Library, the understated powerhouse among contemporary Los Angeles' significant cultural institutions.
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July 1, 2001 | FRED ANDERSON, Fred Anderson is the author of "Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766." He teaches history at the University of Colorado, Boulder
The American Revolution has never lacked interpreters. Many groups--Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Republicans, Democrats, slaveholders, abolitionists, Populists, Progressives, labor unionists, Supreme Court justices, militarists, pacifists, historians--have tried to specify the meaning of this formative event. None of them has ever won the debate, of course; but that does not keep them from trying to define what it means to be an American.
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BOOKS
February 23, 1997 | FRED ANDERSON, Fred Anderson teaches early American history at the University of Colorado, Boulder
George Washington remains both the most familiar and the least understandable of our presidents. Only Abraham Lincoln can rival him as a figure universally studied in elementary and high school history classes, and even Lincoln cannot claim equal standing in a popular culture that for two centuries has rung changes on the cherry tree, a silver dollar flung across the Potomac and the Valley Forge winter. So familiar indeed is he that familiarity itself impedes our ability to see him as human.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES CULTURE CORRESPONDENT
Aristocratic by temperament, but democratic by conviction; instinctually conservative, but intellectually audacious. The attributes so frequently applied to the American republic's founders might be used with equal justice to describe the Huntington Library, the understated powerhouse among contemporary Los Angeles' significant cultural institutions.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001 | FRED ANDERSON, Fred Anderson is the author of "Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766." He teaches history at the University of Colorado, Boulder
The American Revolution has never lacked interpreters. Many groups--Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Republicans, Democrats, slaveholders, abolitionists, Populists, Progressives, labor unionists, Supreme Court justices, militarists, pacifists, historians--have tried to specify the meaning of this formative event. None of them has ever won the debate, of course; but that does not keep them from trying to define what it means to be an American.
BOOKS
May 3, 1998
Sophie Thomas, reader: "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter," by Carson McCullers (Bantam). "I'm Australian, and people there rave about this book. Maybe because it's about unusual people, outcasts. I was a bit put off at first because it's pretty black, but I'm determined to get through it." **** Karen Casey, church consultant: "A Simpler Way," by Margaret Wheatley and Myron Kellner-Rogers (Berrett-Koehler). " 'A Simpler Way' is an astonishingly simple book about a complex issue.
NEWS
December 22, 2005 | Scott Timberg
"The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin" spends a lot of time on shelves and nightstands waiting to be read: It's considered not only a good tale but also a key to the American character. John Rhodehamel, a curator of historical manuscripts at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens -- where the original handwritten edition, partly unbound, recently went on display -- says it's also been misunderstood. "It's been taken by many as a how-to-guide to get rich," he says.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Abill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth. . . ." Three-hundred community leaders turned out in black tie Monday evening at the Huntington Library in San Marino to see the letter in which Thomas Jefferson wrote those words to James Madison and to hear former President Jimmy Carter appeal for human rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1999 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all began innocently enough, but then Chuck Bechtloff ended up a man obsessed with all things Abe Lincoln. His home and three-room office look like an Antiques Road Show, bulging with Lincoln, Civil War and presidential memorabilia. There are thousands of pieces--so many that Bechtloff, a Huntington Beach professional recruiter and admittedly out-of-control collector, has been trying for two years to establish his own nonprofit museum.
BOOKS
February 23, 1997 | FRED ANDERSON, Fred Anderson teaches early American history at the University of Colorado, Boulder
George Washington remains both the most familiar and the least understandable of our presidents. Only Abraham Lincoln can rival him as a figure universally studied in elementary and high school history classes, and even Lincoln cannot claim equal standing in a popular culture that for two centuries has rung changes on the cherry tree, a silver dollar flung across the Potomac and the Valley Forge winter. So familiar indeed is he that familiarity itself impedes our ability to see him as human.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1993 | MARISA LEONARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abraham Lincoln is my name And with my pen I wrote the same I wrote in both haste and speed And left it here for fools to read John Rhodehamel is nervous. The Huntington Library has never mounted an exhibit of this size on a popular figure such as Abraham Lincoln, and he's not quite sure what to expect. He's not sure how many people the large exhibition hall will hold. The fire marshal of San Marino has been muttering about the dangers of overcrowding.
NEWS
July 3, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the minor mysteries of Western culture is how a country that makes a fetish of reason, as France does, can produce quite so much pernicious nonsense masquerading as literary or journalistic analysis. Jacques Derrida and the deconstructionists are Exhibit A. There is, however, nothing mysterious about American publishers' recognition that commerce and controversy often are entwined, which is why so many of these Francophonic fantasies ultimately find an English voice.
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