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John Ridley

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
A week after "12 Years a Slave" writer John Ridley and director-producer Steve McQueen both refrained from thanking one another after winning Oscars - the former for adapted screenplay, the latter for best picture - Ridley downplayed rumors of a rift between the two men. "You can't help people's perceptions, but I am sorry that people perceived that" as a feud, Ridley told the Huffington Post at the SXSW Film Festival, adding that he had said...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
A week after "12 Years a Slave" writer John Ridley and director-producer Steve McQueen both refrained from thanking one another after winning Oscars - the former for adapted screenplay, the latter for best picture - Ridley downplayed rumors of a rift between the two men. "You can't help people's perceptions, but I am sorry that people perceived that" as a feud, Ridley told the Huffington Post at the SXSW Film Festival, adding that he had said...
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO -- I caught John Ridley's Jimi Hendrix movie on the fly in Toronto. Literally. "All Is By My Side" was the last film I watched at the festival before catching a plane back to L.A. The film is both written and directed by Ridley, whose script for "12 Years a Slave" is all the talk at Toronto. “All Is By My Side” is a smaller indie project that captures a year in the life of the game-changing guitarist. WATCH: Toronto Film Festival trailers The year was 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Oliver Gettell
The Oscars on Sunday night were a popular affair with some moving moments -- including speeches from Jared Leto and Lupita Nyong'o -- and some warm humor courtesy of host Ellen DeGeneres. It also had its share of mysteries. Was John Travolta rehearsing backstage or otherwise engaged before he invented the new Broadway singer Adele Dazeem? What was Jennifer Lawrence laughing about when she took the podium to present best actor? And who was that exuberant Frenchman who staged one the night's few upsets?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By John Ridley / ‘12 Years a Slave'
A nearly universal desire among writers is to make themselves conspicuous in their work. It's completely understandable. When a script that you've spent months - if not years - writing has your name on the title page, who wouldn't want the material inside to crackle with style; full of snappy rejoinders that audiences gleefully repeat as they exit the theater. Moments that scream: "I wrote that. " Having worked the whole of my professional life toward achieving such, it's kind of ironic that in adapting Solomon Northup's "Twelve Years a Slave" I would end up taking the exact opposite approach.
BOOKS
August 29, 1999 | THOMAS CURWEN, Thomas Curwen is the deputy editor of Book Review
Tragedy and comedy, according to the ancient Greeks, were the bookends of the world, neat divisions in the realm of dramatic possibility with satire lying somewhere in between. Nowadays these distinctions are often blurred. Violence, the harbinger of the woeful denouement, is leavened by humor. Witness the spate of films that followed the success of "Pulp Fiction," "Fargo" and "To Die For," stories that play murder for laughs, mayhem for pratfall. John Ridley is not far from this territory.
NEWS
July 24, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Ridley nurses no illusions. He'd be the first to tell you that it's been quite some time since Vegas has been the Neverland of pocket squares and peau-de-soie; since Rat Pack high style and high jinks gave way to ... well ... Peter Frampton, and Vicki Lawrence as "Mama," headlining in the Strip's plush main rooms. No matter. As a writer, he knows all one needs is inspiration. And as a gambler, he knows you have to telegraph your intentions to orchestrate just the right atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His screenplay about the Persian Gulf War is now the basis for the Warner Bros. movie "Three Kings," starring George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg and Ice Cube, which opens Friday. He is currently a supervising producer on "Third Watch," the one-hour NBC drama exploring the gritty world of big-city paramedics, police and firefighters that premiered last week. And Knopf has just published his third novel, "Everybody Smokes in Hell," and promptly dispatched him on a cross-country book tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2002 | JAN STUART, NEWSDAY
The Brooklyn Museum might want to consider pulling some of the space it is taking up with "Star Wars" gear and reallocating it to a mustard-colored Cadillac Coupe de Ville that spins like a woozy top when you hit the brakes. If you want to see the real pop-culture design statement of the '70s, look no further. This is the dream machine of "Undercover Brother," a super soul man who wears a matching, two-toned mustard-colored leather jacket and chugs a complementarily tinted soft drink.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Validating its reputation heading into the Academy Awards as 2013's most socially important film, “12 Years a Slave” saw screenwriter John Ridley on Sunday claim the Oscar for adapted screenplay. The film is based on the 1853 memoir of Solomon Northup, a book that fell into obscurity for nearly a century after its initial print run. To win his Oscar, Ridley beat the screenwriters of “Before Midnight,” “Captain Phillips,” “Philomena” and “The Wolf of Wall Street.” With its unflinching period detail and 19 th century dialogue, “12 Years a Slave” chronicles the harrowing ordeal of Northup (portrayed by Chiwetel Ejiofor)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Validating its reputation heading into the Academy Awards as 2013's most socially important film, “12 Years a Slave” saw screenwriter John Ridley on Sunday claim the Oscar for adapted screenplay. The film is based on the 1853 memoir of Solomon Northup, a book that fell into obscurity for nearly a century after its initial print run. To win his Oscar, Ridley beat the screenwriters of “Before Midnight,” “Captain Phillips,” “Philomena” and “The Wolf of Wall Street.” With its unflinching period detail and 19 th century dialogue, “12 Years a Slave” chronicles the harrowing ordeal of Northup (portrayed by Chiwetel Ejiofor)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Mark Olsen
The period drama "12 Years A Slave" swept through the Film Independent Spirit Awards on Saturday, taking five prizes, including feature, director, supporting female, screenplay and cinematography. It won in all but two categories in which it was nominated. "I cannot tell you, as much as I thought the memoir and Solomon's words and work was special, I had no concept until I saw the movie for the first time," said the film's screenwriter, John Ridley, accepting the prize in that category as he referred to protagonist Solomon Northup.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By John Ridley / ‘12 Years a Slave'
A nearly universal desire among writers is to make themselves conspicuous in their work. It's completely understandable. When a script that you've spent months - if not years - writing has your name on the title page, who wouldn't want the material inside to crackle with style; full of snappy rejoinders that audiences gleefully repeat as they exit the theater. Moments that scream: "I wrote that. " Having worked the whole of my professional life toward achieving such, it's kind of ironic that in adapting Solomon Northup's "Twelve Years a Slave" I would end up taking the exact opposite approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The critical praise for "12 Years a Slave" has hit with all the fervor of a revival preacher, the film's significance so heavily underscored as to be almost intimidating. Now, I'm not suggesting this horrific piece of our history isn't challenging material, but director Steve McQueen and screenwriter John Ridley use the full measure of filmmaking's potential to gripping effect. The actors, fearless and fierce, do exceptional work to convert the abstract idea of slavery into concrete shape and form.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO -- I caught John Ridley's Jimi Hendrix movie on the fly in Toronto. Literally. "All Is By My Side" was the last film I watched at the festival before catching a plane back to L.A. The film is both written and directed by Ridley, whose script for "12 Years a Slave" is all the talk at Toronto. “All Is By My Side” is a smaller indie project that captures a year in the life of the game-changing guitarist. WATCH: Toronto Film Festival trailers The year was 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By John Horn
Just a few months ago, Brad Pitt and his production company, Plan B Entertainment, were being skewered all over Hollywood, as the actor was personally blamed for every misstep in the making of “World War Z.” Even the celebrity-fawning Vanity Fair magazine went on the Pitt attack. Today, his zombie movie is a global hit, having grossed more than $536 million around the world. But Pitt's production of “12 Years a Slave” might end up being even more commendable, as the true account of Solomon Northup, a free man sold into slavery, has become the runaway critical hit of the Telluride and Toronto International film festivals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The critical praise for "12 Years a Slave" has hit with all the fervor of a revival preacher, the film's significance so heavily underscored as to be almost intimidating. Now, I'm not suggesting this horrific piece of our history isn't challenging material, but director Steve McQueen and screenwriter John Ridley use the full measure of filmmaking's potential to gripping effect. The actors, fearless and fierce, do exceptional work to convert the abstract idea of slavery into concrete shape and form.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Barbershop," which premieres Sunday night at 10, is Showtime's sitcomization of the film franchise of the same name. It's an obvious move -- the films on which it's based are half-sitcom already, taking place mostly on a single set (meticulously recreated for television) full of colorful characters who talk a lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Barbershop," which premieres Sunday night at 10, is Showtime's sitcomization of the film franchise of the same name. It's an obvious move -- the films on which it's based are half-sitcom already, taking place mostly on a single set (meticulously recreated for television) full of colorful characters who talk a lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2005 | Dinah Eng, Special to The Times
John RIDLEY'S worn a lot of hats as a writer -- novelist, screenwriter, journalist and commentator -- but no project has given him as much joy as penning his first play, "Ten Thousand Years," a story of war from the perspective of Japanese pilots during World War II.
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