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John Ritter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The University of Southern California's School of Theatre announced Sunday it will change its name to the USC School of Dramatic Arts. Officials said the change, effective July 1 and three years in the making, reflects the school's emphasis on a broader range of dramatic expression and programs. “Almost all of the major schools that teach what we teach are called dramatic arts,” Madeline Puzo, the school's dean, told Culture Monster. “Theater is our artistic home, but we know that our students want and will succeed within different platforms.” Puzo added that offstage forms of expression for students include TV, film, webisodes and sketch comedy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
Actor John Ritter, who died in September, appears in a new movie, "Man of the Year." Shot in July 2001, the film stars Ritter as a wealthy honoree at a dinner party that leads to the unraveling of his life. Ritter spent 12 hours with friends to make the improvised dramatic comedy and was paid $100. Straw Weisman, who produced and co-directed the movie, said the idea came to him after a visit to the Cannes Film Festival. "I was frustrated with how long it took to get deals done," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2009 | Michael Ordona
"We all have bullies in our lives and we just assume they're evil, but largely I think that kind of behavior comes from somewhere," says Jason Ritter, who plays a neighborhood tough who commits an almost psychopathically vicious act in "The Education of Charlie Banks." "Certainly the bully in my life, as far as I could tell, the house he grew up in was completely devoid of any love. He had all the money in the world, but you walk around his house and it was cold like a museum.
OPINION
September 20, 2003
John Ritter, my all-time favorite funnyman, made an indelible mark on physical comedy. He made me laugh and, yes, even cry (obituary, Sept. 13). In "Three's Company," his bumbling antics, pretending to be gay, were always good-natured and never demeaning. But of course they would be good-natured because, according to those who knew him, John was an all-around good guy, as sensitive and kind as "Jack Tripper" himself. Rest in peace, John. I'm sure the angels were humming, "C'mon, knock on our door.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2009 | Michael Ordona
"We all have bullies in our lives and we just assume they're evil, but largely I think that kind of behavior comes from somewhere," says Jason Ritter, who plays a neighborhood tough who commits an almost psychopathically vicious act in "The Education of Charlie Banks." "Certainly the bully in my life, as far as I could tell, the house he grew up in was completely devoid of any love. He had all the money in the world, but you walk around his house and it was cold like a museum.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2004 | Robert W. Welkos
The family of television star John Ritter has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the hospital and medical staff who treated the 54-year-old actor after he collapsed on the set of the ABC sitcom "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter" last year. The suit, filed Sept.
NEWS
September 13, 2003 | Richard Verrier and James Bates, Times Staff Writers
The unexpected death of actor John Ritter, who rose to fame in the 1970s as a wacky bachelor in the hit ABC series "Three's Company," not only shocked fans and colleagues but delivered a powerful blow to the ailing network's hopes of reviving its fortunes through the comedian's latest sitcom. Ritter, 54, became sick Thursday after working on an episode of his ABC series, "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter." He underwent surgery at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank and died shortly after 10 p.m. He had an undetected heart flaw, said his publicist, Lisa Kasteler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2003 | Greg Braxton and Susan King, Times Staff Writers
Emmy Award-winning actor John Ritter, who died unexpectedly Thursday night, had a television career marked by comic bookends. His most famous role was as a girl-chasing bachelor. And he was enjoying renewed success as a harried father chasing off the boys who pursued his two teenage girls.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
As John Ritter walked across the stage of the Laurel Theatre in Ventura, during a rehearsal for the play "J for J," fellow actor Jenny Sullivan--who's also the playwright--suddenly got all choked up. Ritter is playing Sullivan's older, mentally retarded brother John Sullivan, while the writer plays herself. "He captured him so well at that moment," Sullivan later recalled, "that I started breathing differently, and it was hard for me to talk."
HEALTH
March 24, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
When John Ritter arrived at the hospital Sept. 11, 2003, he was nauseated and vomiting, and he felt a dull tightening in his chest. Doctors ordered an EKG, which proved inconclusive. But an hour or so later, Ritter's chest tightness was worse, and a second EKG was more dire. Besides, his blood pressure had gone down, his heart rate had gone up, and he seemed to be developing congestion in his lungs. These were all signs of a man having a heart attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2008 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
A Glendale jury on Friday cleared an emergency room doctor of negligence and liability in John Ritter's death, holding he did everything he could to save the comic actor. A physician who examined Ritter two years before he died at age 54 was also held blameless. Jurors said they ignored the aura of celebrity surrounding the civil trial, as well as evidence of Ritter's sterling qualities as a father and actor, in reaching their conclusions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2008 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
In a cameo courtroom appearance, actor Henry Winkler told jurors Wednesday that his friend John Ritter seemed in top form on the set of his television show Sept. 11, 2003, the day he died. By that afternoon, however, Winkler said, he had noticed that Ritter "was sweating. He said, 'You know, I really need to get some water.' That was the last time I saw him."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2008 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
On the set of "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter" in Burbank, actor John Ritter felt queasy. He thought he was suffering from a mild case of food poisoning and wanted to go home, rest, eat crackers and drink 7-Up. Instead, he walked into the emergency room of Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank on Sept. 11, 2003, and was pronounced dead four hours later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Comic actor John Ritter died on his daughter's 5th birthday in September 2003. The next day, his widow, actress Amy Yasbeck, told the girl that her dad's death was unavoidable. Since then, Yasbeck has come to believe the story she told their daughter Stella was wrong. "The doctors told it to me like I was 5 and I told it to her like she was 5," Yasbeck said in an interview with The Times. "The truth is, it's a lot more complicated and it's a lot more sad."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
The family of John Ritter has reached a tentative settlement in a wrongful-death lawsuit against the Burbank medical center where the actor died, an attorney for the hospital said. "There is an agreement in principle," attorney Rory Hernandez said Wednesday. Hearings will be held to finalize the agreement, he said, with the next court session set for today. Hernandez declined to disclose details of the settlement.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Executives at ABC said Tuesday they would hew to an old show business rule: The show must go on. The network decided that its prime-time comedy "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter," would resume production, despite the unexpected death Thursday of its star, John Ritter. The program will stay in its regular Tuesday slot at 8 p.m. and incorporate the loss of his character into the story line.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | RICK DU BROW
TV or not TV . . . THE GAMBLER: "He considered himself a failure at 40," said John Ritter. "He had all these odd jobs and couldn't hold them. And then he gambled everything on this one children's book." The book was "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." The author was L. Frank Baum. And Ritter is starring in his life story Monday in an NBC film co-produced by his company.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2004 | Robert W. Welkos
The family of television star John Ritter has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the hospital and medical staff who treated the 54-year-old actor after he collapsed on the set of the ABC sitcom "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter" last year. The suit, filed Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2004 | Susan King
A posthumous nomination for John Ritter is the TV industry's way of bidding a fond farewell to one of its favorites. The move seems sentimental. Ritter, nominated for outstanding lead actor in a comedy series for ABC's "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter," died unexpectedly at the age of 55 on Sept. 11, 2003, after completing only three episodes of the sitcom's sophomore season.
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