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John Rockwell

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OPINION
May 15, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Much as it pains me to admit this, the first classical music I ever heard was the soundtrack to a cartoon. Probably Bugs Bunny. I remedied this at first thanks to a high school teacher who played us Shostakovich and Mozart and John Cage. Now, I listen to the classics with joy, and without thinking of Bugs or "The Lone Ranger." But opera? That's pretty much a hemi-demi-semi-quaver too far. Which is why I was grateful to talk to John Rockwell. With Wagner's "Ring" cycle spending the summer at the Los Angeles Opera, Rockwell — former Los Angeles Times and New York Times critic and editor, author and founding director of the Lincoln Center Festival — is the ideal guide to the art form (that's a copy of the CD booklet for the seminal 1953 Bayreuth "Siegfried" tucked in his pocket)
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OPINION
May 21, 2010
Two of a kind Re "Senate candidate under fire," and "GOP lawmaker resigns over affair with aide," May 19 How appropriate that the revelations about two more dishonest politicians should appear side by side on the same page. We have Democratic Senate hopeful Richard Blumenthal, who confesses to having "misspoken" about his service record "on a few occasions." Then there's Indiana Rep. Mark Souder, who righteously preached celibacy and fidelity while cheating on his wife.
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OPINION
May 21, 2010
Two of a kind Re "Senate candidate under fire," and "GOP lawmaker resigns over affair with aide," May 19 How appropriate that the revelations about two more dishonest politicians should appear side by side on the same page. We have Democratic Senate hopeful Richard Blumenthal, who confesses to having "misspoken" about his service record "on a few occasions." Then there's Indiana Rep. Mark Souder, who righteously preached celibacy and fidelity while cheating on his wife.
OPINION
May 15, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Much as it pains me to admit this, the first classical music I ever heard was the soundtrack to a cartoon. Probably Bugs Bunny. I remedied this at first thanks to a high school teacher who played us Shostakovich and Mozart and John Cage. Now, I listen to the classics with joy, and without thinking of Bugs or "The Lone Ranger." But opera? That's pretty much a hemi-demi-semi-quaver too far. Which is why I was grateful to talk to John Rockwell. With Wagner's "Ring" cycle spending the summer at the Los Angeles Opera, Rockwell — former Los Angeles Times and New York Times critic and editor, author and founding director of the Lincoln Center Festival — is the ideal guide to the art form (that's a copy of the CD booklet for the seminal 1953 Bayreuth "Siegfried" tucked in his pocket)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1996 | Justin Davidson, Justin Davidson is classical music critic at Newsday
"I've always loved festivals," says John Rockwell, contemplating with satisfaction the fact that after a career spent with his reporter's eye fixed on cultural events, he now has one of his own to run. Rockwell, director of the Lincoln Center Festival (which gets underway Monday and runs through Aug. 11), may be an impresario now, but he is an observer by trade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1987
A 21-year-old man who took refuge in his garage and fired more than 50 rounds from several guns was shot by a San Diego County deputy sheriff early Wednesday morning, police said. John Rockwell Totten Jr. was shot once in the left arm after he began aiming at sheriff's deputies who had surrounded the house, Sgt. Greg Reynolds said. Totten was listed in fair condition Wednesday at Sharp Memorial Hospital. He is being held on $7,000 bond and is scheduled to be arraigned Friday.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A couple of Los Angeles home brewers have big dreams about their hobby. Los Angeles Ale Works, founded by Kristofor Barnes and John Rockwell, has launched its first commercial beer, Gam-Bart, which is similar to a Bavarian Hefeweizen. They'll be pouring it Friday at 6 p.m. at Far Bar in Little Tokyo. Without a space to call their own, the pair have been “ninja-brewing” with downtown's Ohana Brewing Co. The pair have launched a Kickstarter campaign and are seeking private investors to help raise money for their own brewery, either in Culver City or downtown.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Doctors at Loma Linda University Medical Center removed a brain-dead baby boy from life-support systems Saturday after a worldwide search failed to find recipients for his organs, a spokeswoman said. She said the decision to remove life support was made because the baby's organs were deteriorating rapidly, especially the liver. Baby John was born anencephalic--with a brain stem but without the two cerebral hemispheres.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1995 | Daniel Cariaga
NEXT SUMMER: The first annual "Lincoln Center Festival 96," to be held in and around the theaters at the New York City landmark, July 22-Aug. 11, will offer more than 200 performances from artists and attractions from nine countries. Included will be a number of world and U.S. premieres and at least one U.S. debut, that of the 65-member, period-instruments ensemble, the Orchestre Revoluttionaire et Romantique, led by John Eliot Gardiner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2000 | MARK SWED
Seemingly the hardest-working pianist in Los Angeles, Ray has become something of a local legend. Any given week you will find her accompanying a tenor in a Schubert song cycle or performing the latest local composer premiere or appearing with various new music ensembles or involving herself in a Morton Feldman marathon, to say nothing of running the CalArts piano department.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1996 | Justin Davidson, Justin Davidson is classical music critic at Newsday
"I've always loved festivals," says John Rockwell, contemplating with satisfaction the fact that after a career spent with his reporter's eye fixed on cultural events, he now has one of his own to run. Rockwell, director of the Lincoln Center Festival (which gets underway Monday and runs through Aug. 11), may be an impresario now, but he is an observer by trade.
NEWS
May 27, 1999
Kenneth Donald Glancy; Record Company Executive Kenneth Donald Glancy, 74, former record company executive who boosted the careers of David Bowie and Cleo Laine. Glancy was in charge of the artists and repertory of Columbia Records, Columbia's European operations and, in the 1970s, all of RCA's labels worldwide. In 1980 he formed his own Finesse label and issued albums by Mel Torme, the Modern Jazz Quartet and Paul Desmond. He retired in the early 1990s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Embargoed last summer from Los Angeles, Robert Wilson's "the CIVIL warS" is reaching the United States piecemeal. Last weekend Boston's American Repertory Theatre took on the segment of the work seen in Cologne last winter, now translated into English. As usual with Wilson, the reviews ranged from joyous to skeptical.
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