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John Roseboro

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2002 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Roseboro, an All-Star catcher for the Dodgers and a key figure in one of the most violent brawls in baseball history, has died. He was 69. Roseboro died Friday evening at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke. He had been hospitalized for most of the last two months. During his final days, he received calls from many former Dodgers and other former players, among them Sandy Koufax and Juan Marichal, with whom his name will forever be linked.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a youthful 55, Roger Guenveur Smith is at least a few decades too old to carry baseball cards in his wallet, but the one he takes out to show has a special meaning. The memories he discusses on the outdoor patio of an Echo Park coffee shop are not serene: The card — which he found at a swap meet a few years ago — is a replacement for one he burned more than 40 years ago. On the card is Juan Marichal — then a San Francisco Giants pitcher — who, one summer day in 1965, at bat in the third inning of a close game, hauled off and hit Dodgers catcher John Roseboro, who he thought had provoked him. He hit Roseboro hard, with his bat, in the head, three times — enough to draw blood from a 2-inch gash.
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SPORTS
May 22, 1987
John Roseboro, 54, Dodger catcher from 1957-1967 and a 14-season major leaguer, has rejoined the Dodgers as a minor league catching instructor, said club executive Bill Schweppe.
SPORTS
June 14, 2007
Dodgers catchers with at least 10 stolen bases in a season: -- *--* PLAYER YEAR SB PLAYER YEAR SB Lew Ritter 1905 16 Russell Martin 2007 11 John Roseboro 1962 12 Al Lopez 1933 10 Otto Miller 1912 11 Mickey Owen 1942 10 John Roseboro 1958 11 Russell Martin 2006 10 *--* ON THIS PACE Martin is on pace for 28 stolen bases this season, which would rank fourth on the list of most steals by a catcher in one season: *--* PLAYER YEAR TEAM SB 1. John Wathan 1982 Kansas City Royals 36 2.
SPORTS
June 14, 2007
Dodgers catchers with at least 10 stolen bases in a season: -- *--* PLAYER YEAR SB PLAYER YEAR SB Lew Ritter 1905 16 Russell Martin 2007 11 John Roseboro 1962 12 Al Lopez 1933 10 Otto Miller 1912 11 Mickey Owen 1942 10 John Roseboro 1958 11 Russell Martin 2006 10 *--* ON THIS PACE Martin is on pace for 28 stolen bases this season, which would rank fourth on the list of most steals by a catcher in one season: *--* PLAYER YEAR TEAM SB 1. John Wathan 1982 Kansas City Royals 36 2.
SPORTS
July 6, 2002
Bravo to Bill Plaschke's column about John Roseboro. Time has allowed us to forget the greats of baseball. Unless someone's record is broken, little is heard until the obituary is written. I am a lifelong Dodger fan. I was too young to really appreciate Campy and I was always impressed watching Yeager and Scioscia call a game in the '70s and '80s. But my teen years in the '60s, that was when John Roseboro was synonymous with the name Dodgers. My thoughts and prayers go to John Roseboro and his family.
SPORTS
June 30, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
What Juan Marichal's bat couldn't do, the fury of two blood clots did. There lay the toughest Los Angeles Dodger catcher two weeks ago, the sudden victim of two strokes, barely able to speak, still trying to call the game. "I'm done," John Roseboro mumbled to his wife and daughter. "I'm done." Three years with a failing heart had sapped his strength. Three years of seclusion in his basement had flat-lined his perspective. This latest squealing ride to Cedars-Sinai had stolen his will.
SPORTS
July 20, 1987 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
John Roseboro, hired by the Dodgers as a part-time minor-league hitting instructor five weeks after Al Campanis' controversial remarks about blacks in baseball, said Sunday that he believes minorities have more opportunity to advance in baseball management in the aftermath of the incident. Roseboro, a participant in Sunday's old-timers' game at Dodger Stadium, also said he would like to become a full-time Dodger employee with a chance for advancement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a youthful 55, Roger Guenveur Smith is at least a few decades too old to carry baseball cards in his wallet, but the one he takes out to show has a special meaning. The memories he discusses on the outdoor patio of an Echo Park coffee shop are not serene: The card — which he found at a swap meet a few years ago — is a replacement for one he burned more than 40 years ago. On the card is Juan Marichal — then a San Francisco Giants pitcher — who, one summer day in 1965, at bat in the third inning of a close game, hauled off and hit Dodgers catcher John Roseboro, who he thought had provoked him. He hit Roseboro hard, with his bat, in the head, three times — enough to draw blood from a 2-inch gash.
SPORTS
August 21, 2002 | Steve Springer
Former Dodger catcher John Roseboro was nicknamed "Gabby" because he was anything but. Catching, not conversation, was his forte. But Tuesday at Dodger Stadium, the conversation in both dugouts was about Roseboro, who died last Friday at 69. Florida Marlin Manager Jeff Torborg, who played with Roseboro, marveled at his low-key demeanor. "We'd be celebrating a World Series win or a pennant win," Torborg said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2002 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Roseboro, an All-Star catcher for the Dodgers and a key figure in one of the most violent brawls in baseball history, has died. He was 69. Roseboro died Friday evening at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke. He had been hospitalized for most of the last two months. During his final days, he received calls from many former Dodgers and other former players, among them Sandy Koufax and Juan Marichal, with whom his name will forever be linked.
SPORTS
July 6, 2002
Bravo to Bill Plaschke's column about John Roseboro. Time has allowed us to forget the greats of baseball. Unless someone's record is broken, little is heard until the obituary is written. I am a lifelong Dodger fan. I was too young to really appreciate Campy and I was always impressed watching Yeager and Scioscia call a game in the '70s and '80s. But my teen years in the '60s, that was when John Roseboro was synonymous with the name Dodgers. My thoughts and prayers go to John Roseboro and his family.
SPORTS
June 30, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
What Juan Marichal's bat couldn't do, the fury of two blood clots did. There lay the toughest Los Angeles Dodger catcher two weeks ago, the sudden victim of two strokes, barely able to speak, still trying to call the game. "I'm done," John Roseboro mumbled to his wife and daughter. "I'm done." Three years with a failing heart had sapped his strength. Three years of seclusion in his basement had flat-lined his perspective. This latest squealing ride to Cedars-Sinai had stolen his will.
SPORTS
February 23, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
There was at least one attack in sports history that was more brutal than Marty McSorley's on Donald Brashear Monday night at Vancouver. In 1965 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, Giant pitcher Juan Marichal assaulted John Roseboro with a baseball bat.
SPORTS
August 22, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Roseboro had finished working with minor leaguers at Bakersfield Monday night when he heard some news that quickened his pulse. There had been a fight at Dodger Stadium. It involved a Dodger catcher and an opposing hitter. "I got home and turned on the TV, all of the news stations, but I couldn't see any highlights," Roseboro said of the fight between the Dodgers' Rick Dempsey and Philadelphia's Lenny Dykstra. "I picked up the newspaper the next day but I couldn't get any details.
SPORTS
December 29, 1987
John Roseboro, former Dodger catcher, has been released from a hospital after undergoing triple bypass heart surgery last Monday at the UCLA Medical Center. Roseboro, 54, who has been serving as an instructor in the Dodgers' minor league system, is expected to return to the team next month.
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