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John Roulac

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NEWS
January 14, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Roulac picks up a grocery box of wilted lettuce leaves and empties it into a large round plastic bin. "Compost is like cooking," he explains. "You start with a good recipe, you add different ingredients and you experiment with the mix until you get it right. Today we'll teach you a few things about making a good compost pile."
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NEWS
January 14, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Roulac picks up a grocery box of wilted lettuce leaves and empties it into a large round plastic bin. "Compost is like cooking," he explains. "You start with a good recipe, you add different ingredients and you experiment with the mix until you get it right. Today we'll teach you a few things about making a good compost pile."
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NEWS
July 25, 1991
Four hundred compost bins will be given to Glendale residents beginning Saturday in the city's first trial back-yard composting program. The program is intended to build public acceptance of composting, which promotes decomposition of leaves, grass and food scraps, said Tom Brady of the city's Integrated Solid Waste Management Section. At present, the city has programs to recycle yard waste, but not food scraps, which make up about 8% of the volume sent to landfills, Brady said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
The hemp food industry declared victory Monday in its three-year battle over the federal government's effort to ban sales and consumption of bread, protein powders and other food products made from the psychoactively benign botanical cousin of marijuana. Federal officials declined to appeal a February ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rejecting the Drug Enforcement Administration's attempts to block sales and consumption of hemp foods. "It's a great legal victory," said John W.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
Shoes, socks, lip balm, paper, twine, coffee filters, snack bars, dog collars, soap, jeans, wallets, candles, insulation, paints, cosmetics, plasters, blankets and fuel are just a few things that can be done with hemp other than smoking it. The environmentally friendly weed, which is used around the world for its fiber, seed and oil, requires little fertilizer and pesticides to grow. It can be used instead of trees to make paper and is a source of biomass fuel. So why aren't we using it?
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the problems bedeviling the recycler's world is finding a market for the material they amass. No problem with aluminum cans. They're almost worth more cash dead than alive. The same is true of newspapers. This very page is probably experiencing its second or third printing. But what about yard clippings? Indeed, who cares anything at all about yard clippings? Except about getting rid of them. And how do we do that?
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
From kitschy gift to kitchen darling, chia is having another 15 minutes of fame. And this time, it's not slathered on clay "pets. " Chia seeds have become popular for their omega-3 fatty acids and fiber content. With their neutral taste, they can be consumed in many ways - now they're even showing up in processed foods such as chips and spreads. Eaten by the Maya and Aztec people, chia seeds have long been reputed to be nutritional powerhouses. "They were basics when we grew up," says Ramiro Arvizu, a chef at La Casita Mexicana in Bell.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We are all aware of the thousands of self-help books inundating us with advice on just about everything. Many of them are slickly packaged and filled with good old common sense stuff. Others are full of questionable theories about how health, wealth and career success can be achieved with little effort. However, here in Ventura, there is a growing publishing industry being fueled by entrepreneurial writers who are producing fine, basic self-help books that deliver what they promise.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Earth-saving is not just for tree huggers and eco-warriors anymore. We all want information on the planet's health and Earth-friendly tips to incorporate into our lives. One way to stay ahead of the headlines is to invite environmental speakers to clubs and schools. PBS will be carrying a report next week by Dr. Michael Klaper--of "Diet for a New America" fame--about environmentally oriented eating.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | DOUG SMITH
About 250 earth-conscious Glendale residents looked fearlessly into the future of garbage this past weekend. What they saw was clean-smelling, tidy and attractive. It generated no pollution, took up no space in landfills and demanded no fleet of noisy municipal vehicles to carry it away. It was a boon to the Earth. But, most surprising, it had a lot in common with the garbage of the past. In the old days, if you remember, people took care of their own garbage.
HOME & GARDEN
August 10, 1991 | KAREN DARDICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mulch has been an important ingredient in any well-planned landscape, and now in the midst of a five-year drought, it's more crucial than ever for Californians. You don't have to be an avid gardener to benefit from the addition of mulch to your garden. The simple act of placing a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch on your soil automatically reduces landscape water consumption by 10% to 15%, practically eliminates laborious weedingand saves on fertilizer costs. What is mulch?
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