Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Rowland
IN THE NEWS

John Rowland

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
February 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Gov. John G. Rowland walked out of federal prison, after serving 10 months for corruption, promising to "try to be a better person." Rowland, 48, was released from a prison in Pennsylvania before dawn. He will be fitted with an electronic ankle bracelet and spend four months under house arrest. He must also perform 300 hours of community service.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Gov. John G. Rowland walked out of federal prison, after serving 10 months for corruption, promising to "try to be a better person." Rowland, 48, was released from a prison in Pennsylvania before dawn. He will be fitted with an electronic ankle bracelet and spend four months under house arrest. He must also perform 300 hours of community service.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 5, 1998
Here are the latest returns in the gubernatorial races nationwide. For California results, see tables on state returns. (i)=incumbent.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Former Connecticut Gov. John G. Rowland, once a hugely popular figure in his home state and a rising star in the Republican Party, was sentenced Friday to a year in prison after pleading guilty to a single federal corruption charge. Appearing before U.S. District Judge Peter C. Dorsey in New Haven, Conn., Rowland, 47, said: "I am ashamed to be here today, and I accept full responsibility for my actions."
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 35-year-old accountant opened fire at the headquarters of the Connecticut state lottery Friday, killing three top officials before chasing down and slaying the lottery's president in a parking lot. He then fatally turned his automatic pistol on himself. Terrified workers fled into the woods outside the building in Newington, Conn., near the capital, Hartford. Others hid in a paint warehouse and in a ditch during the carnage.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
Some Democratic legislators said Saturday they would pursue impeachment proceedings against Gov. John G. Rowland if he does not step aside, but a top aide said the Republican has no plans to leave office over his admission that a state contractor helped pay for work on his summer home. Dean Pagani, Rowland's spokesman and chief of staff, said the governor had not been accused of any wrongdoing and was cooperating fully with federal investigators.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
There was little doubt that a hot tub and cathedral ceiling would spruce up the cottage on the lake. The problem was that Gov. John G. Rowland allowed state employees and a politically connected contractor to pay for or perform the work on his summer retreat -- and then lied about how he financed the improvements.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Former Connecticut Gov. John G. Rowland, once a hugely popular figure in his home state and a rising star in the Republican Party, was sentenced Friday to a year in prison after pleading guilty to a single federal corruption charge. Appearing before U.S. District Judge Peter C. Dorsey in New Haven, Conn., Rowland, 47, said: "I am ashamed to be here today, and I accept full responsibility for my actions."
NATIONAL
January 8, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Gov. John G. Rowland of Connecticut apologized Wednesday for lying about gifts he accepted, but pledged to remain in office despite a federal corruption probe and calls for his resignation or impeachment. "I lied and there are no excuses," the governor said in a six-minute speech televised throughout New England. "I should have known better, and I do know better."
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. John Rowland signed legislation that adds 61 cents to the state's cigarette tax, making it the third-highest in the nation. Rowland proposed the tax increase, expected to generate $130 million in the next fiscal year, to help close a two-year budget gap estimated at $1 billion. The state tax will rise to $1.11 per pack on April 3. Only New York and Washington have higher cigarette taxes.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Gov. John G. Rowland of Connecticut apologized Wednesday for lying about gifts he accepted, but pledged to remain in office despite a federal corruption probe and calls for his resignation or impeachment. "I lied and there are no excuses," the governor said in a six-minute speech televised throughout New England. "I should have known better, and I do know better."
NATIONAL
December 21, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
There was little doubt that a hot tub and cathedral ceiling would spruce up the cottage on the lake. The problem was that Gov. John G. Rowland allowed state employees and a politically connected contractor to pay for or perform the work on his summer retreat -- and then lied about how he financed the improvements.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
Some Democratic legislators said Saturday they would pursue impeachment proceedings against Gov. John G. Rowland if he does not step aside, but a top aide said the Republican has no plans to leave office over his admission that a state contractor helped pay for work on his summer home. Dean Pagani, Rowland's spokesman and chief of staff, said the governor had not been accused of any wrongdoing and was cooperating fully with federal investigators.
NEWS
November 5, 1998
Here are the latest returns in the gubernatorial races nationwide. For California results, see tables on state returns. (i)=incumbent.
NEWS
June 9, 1991
Students at Grandview School in Valinda will perform a musical, "Two Partners," to honor William Workman and John Rowland, who led the first Overland covered wagon train into Southern California, according to teacher Barbara Ricchio, who wrote the play. Admission is free to the performance at 12:45 p.m. Friday at the school at 795 N. Grandview Lane.
NEWS
June 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Connecticut Gov. John Rowland vetoed the bitterly contested "Sooty Six" bill aimed at forcing the state's oldest and most-polluting power plants to reduce emissions. The bill had been debated for four years as environmentalists and the electric power industry squared off. "This is one of the more difficult decisions I've had to make as governor over the last seven years," Rowland said. "There's no one in Connecticut that does not want clean air."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|