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John Ryan

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NATIONAL
November 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A snowboarder survived three days lost in the backcountry wilderness by building a shelter of pine boughs as temperatures dropped into the low teens, his rescuers said. John Ryan, 31, of Erie was found a few hundred yards from the boundaries of the Keystone ski resort, where he had gone riding alone Wednesday, said Mike Schmitt, spokesman for Summit County Search and Rescue. "Whatever he did, he did something right to stay alive these last three days," Schmitt said.
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NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- More than 100 sexually exploited teenagers, some as young as 13, were recovered in a nationwide sex trafficking sting over the weekend, the FBI announced Monday. The three-day sweep of 76 cities, focusing on underage victims of prostitution, rescued 105 teens and resulted in 150 arrests of pimps and other individuals. Working with nearly 4,000 local, state and federal law enforcement officers, it was the seventh and largest operation to date in the FBI's Innocence Lost initiative, which it says has identified and rescued more than 2,700 sexually exploited children since 2003.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998
Re "Cable TV Firm, Gay Dancers Argue Over Tape," March 12. John Robinson of Avenue Cable says the reason he declined to broadcast the program about gay square-dancing is that the group would not pay a $40 fee. This is not true. The intent is to divert attention from the real reason for denial--the show's gay content. John Ryan, the Ventura resident who requested the airing, had a number of meetings with Avenue Cable regarding the show over a period of four months. Each time, the story changed as to why they wouldn't air it--but it's clear that the real issue was the gay subject matter.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A snowboarder survived three days lost in the backcountry wilderness by building a shelter of pine boughs as temperatures dropped into the low teens, his rescuers said. John Ryan, 31, of Erie was found a few hundred yards from the boundaries of the Keystone ski resort, where he had gone riding alone Wednesday, said Mike Schmitt, spokesman for Summit County Search and Rescue. "Whatever he did, he did something right to stay alive these last three days," Schmitt said.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988
After having read "The Hunt for Red October" and "Red Storm Rising," we became avid fans of Tom Clancy. Thus, when his "new" book, "Patriot Games" was announced, both of us eagerly awaited its release. As editors, we both appreciate the attention to detail and the incredible amount of research required to complete books of the order of magnitude of the first two. One of us, a naval officer for eight years, heavily involved in antisubmarine warfare and wartime contingency planning, has been particularly impressed with the ability of Clancy to acquire information not usually available to even the most inquisitive and make it readable to the laymen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1985 | JOHN HORN
"The Cotton Club," which hits the video stores today, will be the first videocassette to carry a new anti-piracy process that its developers say should eliminate casual, illegal duplicating by consumers. The process, created by Macrovision, will produce home-copied cassettes that are "perfectly unwatchable," an official says. The process, announced at a Tuesday press conference by Embassy Home Entertainment, which is distributing "The Cotton Club" videocassette, is the invention of John Ryan.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- More than 100 sexually exploited teenagers, some as young as 13, were recovered in a nationwide sex trafficking sting over the weekend, the FBI announced Monday. The three-day sweep of 76 cities, focusing on underage victims of prostitution, rescued 105 teens and resulted in 150 arrests of pimps and other individuals. Working with nearly 4,000 local, state and federal law enforcement officers, it was the seventh and largest operation to date in the FBI's Innocence Lost initiative, which it says has identified and rescued more than 2,700 sexually exploited children since 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writer
They did the Caped Crusader proud Monday. In a scene reminiscent of the lavish Hollywood openings of a generation ago, two Westwood theaters were decorated in "Batman" motifs, and more than 8,000 people poured into the streets or scrambled onto roofs to watch celebrities arrive at the premiere of the Warner Bros. movie. The entrance to the Bruin Theater was redone to look like the entrance to the Bat Cave, and the Mann Village Theater across the street was adorned with a 20-foot-tall cutout figure of Batman.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John E. Ryan, the federal judge selected to preside over the largest municipal bankruptcy case in U.S. history, is a 53-year-old former corporate attorney and decorated Navy fighter pilot with a background in securities cases. Ryan, who sits in the Santa Ana branch of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court's hectic Central Division of California, has built a reputation for cost-consciousness and efficiency in eight years on the bench.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge John E. Ryan on Friday warned lawyers in Orange County's increasingly complex bond pool bankruptcy case not to expect excessive fees at a time when county employees are being laid off and public services are being slashed. "The county is going through dramatic days," Ryan said. "It is not going to be said that the only group that benefited from this (bankruptcy) are the attorneys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998
Re "Cable TV Firm, Gay Dancers Argue Over Tape," March 12. John Robinson of Avenue Cable says the reason he declined to broadcast the program about gay square-dancing is that the group would not pay a $40 fee. This is not true. The intent is to divert attention from the real reason for denial--the show's gay content. John Ryan, the Ventura resident who requested the airing, had a number of meetings with Avenue Cable regarding the show over a period of four months. Each time, the story changed as to why they wouldn't air it--but it's clear that the real issue was the gay subject matter.
NEWS
April 30, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, John Edward Ryan began each work day by reciting a bit of verse. "This is the beginning of a new day. God has given me this day to use as I will. I can waste it . . . or use it for good," the federal judge with a Boston Irishman's accent would remind the crop of lawyers funneling through his courtroom for mundane motions on bankruptcy cases. "But what I do today is important because I am exchanging a day of my life for it."
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge John E. Ryan on Friday warned lawyers in Orange County's increasingly complex bond pool bankruptcy case not to expect excessive fees at a time when county employees are being laid off and public services are being slashed. "The county is going through dramatic days," Ryan said. "It is not going to be said that the only group that benefited from this (bankruptcy) are the attorneys.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John E. Ryan, the federal judge selected to preside over the largest municipal bankruptcy case in U.S. history, is a 53-year-old former corporate attorney and decorated Navy fighter pilot with a background in securities cases. Ryan, who sits in the Santa Ana branch of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court's hectic Central Division of California, has built a reputation for cost-consciousness and efficiency in eight years on the bench.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writer
They did the Caped Crusader proud Monday. In a scene reminiscent of the lavish Hollywood openings of a generation ago, two Westwood theaters were decorated in "Batman" motifs, and more than 8,000 people poured into the streets or scrambled onto roofs to watch celebrities arrive at the premiere of the Warner Bros. movie. The entrance to the Bruin Theater was redone to look like the entrance to the Bat Cave, and the Mann Village Theater across the street was adorned with a 20-foot-tall cutout figure of Batman.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988
After having read "The Hunt for Red October" and "Red Storm Rising," we became avid fans of Tom Clancy. Thus, when his "new" book, "Patriot Games" was announced, both of us eagerly awaited its release. As editors, we both appreciate the attention to detail and the incredible amount of research required to complete books of the order of magnitude of the first two. One of us, a naval officer for eight years, heavily involved in antisubmarine warfare and wartime contingency planning, has been particularly impressed with the ability of Clancy to acquire information not usually available to even the most inquisitive and make it readable to the laymen.
NEWS
April 30, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, John Edward Ryan began each work day by reciting a bit of verse. "This is the beginning of a new day. God has given me this day to use as I will. I can waste it . . . or use it for good," the federal judge with a Boston Irishman's accent would remind the crop of lawyers funneling through his courtroom for mundane motions on bankruptcy cases. "But what I do today is important because I am exchanging a day of my life for it."
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ervil LeBaron listened carefully when God told him to take many wives. He married 13. When God told him to have children, he had at least 50. And, 20 years ago, when God told him to break away from his family's polygamist sect, he founded his own church, tearing apart the once close-knit family. That's apparently when God told Ervil to start killing people, too, including his own kin. Authorities say it was the start of a chilling family tradition that continues to reverberate today among his descendants and followers more than a decade after his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1985 | JOHN HORN
"The Cotton Club," which hits the video stores today, will be the first videocassette to carry a new anti-piracy process that its developers say should eliminate casual, illegal duplicating by consumers. The process, created by Macrovision, will produce home-copied cassettes that are "perfectly unwatchable," an official says. The process, announced at a Tuesday press conference by Embassy Home Entertainment, which is distributing "The Cotton Club" videocassette, is the invention of John Ryan.
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