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July 10, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, Lorraine Ali writes about pop music for Calendar
John S. Hall looks around the patio of his West Hollywood hotel with nervous suspicion. The spoken-word artist and singer of the New York-based rock group King Missile studies his surroundings carefully, his dark eyes shifting from the passing waiter to the gleaming pool to his plate of wheat pancakes. Though there's nothing particularly intriguing about this environment to the average eye, Hall is an artist who thrives on the everyday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, Lorraine Ali writes about pop music for Calendar
John S. Hall looks around the patio of his West Hollywood hotel with nervous suspicion. The spoken-word artist and singer of the New York-based rock group King Missile studies his surroundings carefully, his dark eyes shifting from the passing waiter to the gleaming pool to his plate of wheat pancakes. Though there's nothing particularly intriguing about this environment to the average eye, Hall is an artist who thrives on the everyday.
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NEWS
April 29, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
In alternative rock circles, alienation has been king, is king and may ever be king. After all, most of the people playing the stuff, and even more of the fans buying it, are in that 15-to-30 age group when youthful idealism almost inevitably gives way to disillusionment (those who were of that age back in hippie daze may have taken a little longer to understand this inevitability). But every king needs a jester--even King Alienation. That's where King Missile comes in.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
In alternative rock circles, alienation has been king, is king and may ever be king. After all, most of the people playing the stuff, and even more of the fans buying it, are in that 15-to-30 age group when youthful idealism almost inevitably gives way to disillusionment (those who were of that age back in hippie daze may have taken a little longer to understand this inevitability). But every king needs a jester--even King Alienation. That's where King Missile comes in.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Indians lived all over this land before we came and killed them. That was very bad of us. We thought we needed the land, but for the most part, we just ruined it anyway. And now nobody can use it. That's the way we are. We're pigs." So writes John S. Hall, guidance system of those New York rockers, King Missile. That's his serious side, and it doesn't last long. One of his songs, "Indians," ends with a cockroach falling on the songwriter's paper and getting squished.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN
If the band King Missile--currently of "Detachable Penis" fame--had anything resembling an attitude, it would be insufferable. Its origins are in singer-lyricist John S. Hall's stint on the New York poetry and performance-art front, and his rants--sometimes sung with a whine, often spoken--tend to play out like that school of modern poetry that's like stand-up comedy without the punch lines. So you have reason to expect the worst: detachable ironic superiority.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1994 | ROBERT LEVINE
It's ironic that the man who wrote "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" would headline the "Free Your Mind Spoken Word Tour"--a road show sponsored by television force MTV. Nevertheless, Gil Scott-Heron's politicized urban poetry fit in well at the Troubadour on Monday, in a four-artist show that emphasized the performance of verse as well as its content.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Maggie Estep, novelist and spoken word artist, has died at age 50, the New York Times reported. Estep, who published seven books after her start on stage, suffered a heart attack two days ago at her home in Hudson, N.Y., and died Wednesday at a hospital in Albany. Estep was part of a generation of spoken word artists who had a surprisingly wide cultural impact. She appeared on HBO's "Def Poetry Jam" (an online clip includes explicit language) and MTV, and was a star of MTV's 1994 spoken word tour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1994 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Percival Lowell, wealthy scion of a Massachusetts textile family, was obsessed with Mars: He sought to prove that life existed on the Red Planet. So he dispatched a Harvard astronomer on a hasty rail tour to scour the Arizona Territory for a telescope site. Lowell ultimately failed in his quest. But, 100 years after he first peered through a telescope from Mars Hill in Flagstaff on May 28, 1894, the observatory he founded is thriving.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Indians lived all over this land before we came and killed them. That was very bad of us. We thought we needed the land, but for the most part, we just ruined it anyway. And now nobody can use it. That's the way we are. We're pigs." So writes John S. Hall, guidance system of those New York rockers, King Missile. That's his serious side, and it doesn't last long. One of his songs, "Indians," ends with a cockroach falling on the songwriter's paper and getting squished.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's a song that people notice," says John S. Hall, the singer and writer for the New York-based band King Missile. That's a bit like saying that Michael Jackson is a guy that people chat about. The song under discussion is King Missile's "Detachable Penis," a droll recitation about a missing member set to a deliberate beat and guitar hook, backed by a deadpan chorus singing the title phrase.
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