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NEWS
December 23, 1988
Despite fresh obstacles to restarting nuclear weapons reactors at the government's Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, the United States does not face a shortage of perishable tritium gas that could imperil the nation's nuclear force, Energy Secretary John S. Herrington said. Herrington said that he foresees no need to "cannibalize" tritium from some weapons to keep others in working order, as some officials have suggested might be necessary.
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NEWS
November 14, 1996 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
State Republican Party chief John Herrington confirmed Wednesday that he is in the running for the chairmanship of the Republican National Committee, the umbrella organization that raises money and dispenses clout for GOP candidates nationwide. Herrington, 57, has been head of the California Republican Party since February 1995.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A Texas politician who plans to meet with OPEC ministers next week is "being used" by the oil cartel and is "playing right into their hands," Energy Secretary John S. Herrington said Friday. Herrington said he doesn't challenge the right of Kent R. Hance, a member of the powerful Texas Railroad Commission, to meet with the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. But he said, "I would prefer he didn't."
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson emerged Sunday from another raucous Republican state convention with about the most he could hope for from a party apparatus dominated the past two years by the conservative right and Christian activists: The 1,321 delegates left town without blatantly embarrassing the moderate governor. In the long run, Wilson may benefit from Sunday's elections.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last of Ronald Reagan's longtime political associates has quit the board that built Reagan's presidential library, expressing disappointment that other close advisers squeezed out this year would not be reappointed. In a letter to the former President, former Energy Secretary John S. Herrington resigned from the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation that raised $60 million for the library near Simi Valley. Herrington was the only longtime Reagan associate spared last April when former U.S.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Energy Secretary John S. Herrington, opening a public battle with a fellow Cabinet member, said Wednesday that the proposed draining of the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir would force the spending of billions of dollars to find replacement water and power for the San Francisco Bay Area. The energy secretary's remarks were in total disagreement with the stated position of Interior Secretary Donald P.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Jovanovich, the unconventional publisher who led Harcourt Brace Jovanovich for 35 years, has turned over his post as chairman of the book publishing conglomerate to former Energy Secretary John S. Herrington. Announcing the appointment Tuesday, Harcourt's board said it had also given Jovanovich's son, Peter, who is chief executive and president, the added title of chairman of the executive committee.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson emerged Sunday from another raucous Republican state convention with about the most he could hope for from a party apparatus dominated the past two years by the conservative right and Christian activists: The 1,321 delegates left town without blatantly embarrassing the moderate governor. In the long run, Wilson may benefit from Sunday's elections.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Energy Secretary John S. Herrington, citing a festering dispute among researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory over a cornerstone of President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative, Friday cautioned the nation's weapons scientists against publicly airing their disagreements. Speaking at the laboratory, Herrington said Roy D.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department is resisting pressure from the defense community to immediately restart its troubled weapons reactors at Savannah River as a signal that the United States will not allow its military preparedness to erode, according to Energy Secretary John S. Herrington.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last of Ronald Reagan's longtime political associates has quit the board that built Reagan's presidential library, expressing disappointment that other close advisers squeezed out this year would not be reappointed. In a letter to the former President, former Energy Secretary John S. Herrington resigned from the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation that raised $60 million for the library near Simi Valley. Herrington was the only longtime Reagan associate spared last April when former U.S.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Jovanovich, the unconventional publisher who led Harcourt Brace Jovanovich for 35 years, has turned over his post as chairman of the book publishing conglomerate to former Energy Secretary John S. Herrington. Announcing the appointment Tuesday, Harcourt's board said it had also given Jovanovich's son, Peter, who is chief executive and president, the added title of chairman of the executive committee.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department is resisting pressure from the defense community to immediately restart its troubled weapons reactors at Savannah River as a signal that the United States will not allow its military preparedness to erode, according to Energy Secretary John S. Herrington.
NEWS
December 23, 1988
Despite fresh obstacles to restarting nuclear weapons reactors at the government's Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, the United States does not face a shortage of perishable tritium gas that could imperil the nation's nuclear force, Energy Secretary John S. Herrington said. Herrington said that he foresees no need to "cannibalize" tritium from some weapons to keep others in working order, as some officials have suggested might be necessary.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Energy Secretary John S. Herrington, citing a festering dispute among researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory over a cornerstone of President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative, Friday cautioned the nation's weapons scientists against publicly airing their disagreements. Speaking at the laboratory, Herrington said Roy D.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A Texas politician who plans to meet with OPEC ministers next week is "being used" by the oil cartel and is "playing right into their hands," Energy Secretary John S. Herrington said Friday. Herrington said he doesn't challenge the right of Kent R. Hance, a member of the powerful Texas Railroad Commission, to meet with the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. But he said, "I would prefer he didn't."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
California Republican Party Chairman John Herrington said Friday that he is thinking seriously about running for chairman of the Republican National Committee and will make a decision in the next few days. "I am being urged by a number of Republicans from the Reagan Administration days and since to run for chairman. I am thinking very seriously about it and hope to come to a decision over the weekend. I am interested," Herrington said.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
A private housing development planned by John Herrington before he became U.S. Energy Secretary was improperly killed by local officials in Northern California, but a jury's $2.5-million damage award was excessive, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. 'Shocks the Conscience' The U.S.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
A private housing development planned by John Herrington before he became U.S. Energy Secretary was improperly killed by local officials in Northern California, but a jury's $2.5-million damage award was excessive, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. 'Shocks the Conscience' The U.S.
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