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John Sanford

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
John Sanford, a prolific but neglected writer who was blacklisted in the 1950s and produced unconventional works that blended the lines between history, fiction and autobiography, has died. He was 98. The author of 24 published books who was often compared to William Carlos Williams and John Dos Passos, Sanford died of an aortic aneurysm Thursday at a hospital near his home in Montecito, said his grandnephew, Jerry Gustafson.
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MAGAZINE
March 5, 2006 | Aris Janigian, Aris Janigian, a contributing writer to West, is the author of the novel "Bloodvine."
Every year about this time, as winter edges into spring, I think about driving to Santa Barbara to visit my good friend John Sanford. Situated on a cliff, the cemetery where he rests is one of the most beautiful I've ever seen. "This land's-end place," Sanford described it in some of the last words he ever wrote, "seems to be bounded only by sea and sky, and what sound can be heard there is the wind, the surf, and, if rain has fallen, the shrill of shore-birds come to drill the softened earth."
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NEWS
November 23, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This book is a master class in love, the chronicle of the author's 50 years of marriage to the screenwriter Marguerite Roberts. You could ransack an entire library without learning as much about commitment, mutual respect, delight, devotion and resilience as you'll find in these succinct pages. The story is told in some of the most distinctive prose written in this century, so individual in structure, cadence and vocabulary as to be not only immediately recognizable but virtually inimitable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2003 | TIM RUTTEN
In his 99th year, John Sanford was such a singular writer that it's somehow unsurprising that, when death came quietly for him Thursday morning, even it could not quite end his extraordinary career. Sanford published 24 books: nine novels, five genre-defying works he called "creative interpretations of history" and 10 volumes of autobiography and memoirs, including the five-book sequence, "Scenes From the Life of an American Jew." More than half his books were completed after he turned 80.
MAGAZINE
March 5, 2006 | Aris Janigian, Aris Janigian, a contributing writer to West, is the author of the novel "Bloodvine."
Every year about this time, as winter edges into spring, I think about driving to Santa Barbara to visit my good friend John Sanford. Situated on a cliff, the cemetery where he rests is one of the most beautiful I've ever seen. "This land's-end place," Sanford described it in some of the last words he ever wrote, "seems to be bounded only by sea and sky, and what sound can be heard there is the wind, the surf, and, if rain has fallen, the shrill of shore-birds come to drill the softened earth."
BOOKS
March 13, 1988 | Elaine Kendall
Noting the 17 books of John Sanford's 55-year literary career neatly listed by his publisher as nine novels, four interpretations of history, one collection of letters and three volumes of autobiography, you'd have every reason to think him a writer working in well-established genres, yet nothing could be further from the truth. The novels are both autobiographical and historical.
BOOKS
December 25, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH
THE VIEW FROM MOUNT MORRIS: A Harlem Boyhood by John Sanford (Barricade Books: $22; 231 pp.). John Sanford, now 90, between 1939 and 1964 published books with Alfred A. Knopf, Harcourt Brace, Doubleday, and W. W. Norton; since 1976 he's published a dozen more books, none with a major publishing house. It's conceivable that these more recent titles had less merit than his earlier work . . . but I doubt it, for if "The View From Mt.
NEWS
July 31, 2002
These are the opening paragraphs of John Sanford's forthcoming book, "A Palace of Silver": Near one end of the Santa Barbara beach rises a hill called Bellosgarda, and spreading over its grounds is a cemetery. From the grounds, no part of the city can be seen; the view is of mountains inland and the Channel seaward, an expanse of some twenty miles to a chain of islands lying lavender along the horizon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2003 | TIM RUTTEN
In his 99th year, John Sanford was such a singular writer that it's somehow unsurprising that, when death came quietly for him Thursday morning, even it could not quite end his extraordinary career. Sanford published 24 books: nine novels, five genre-defying works he called "creative interpretations of history" and 10 volumes of autobiography and memoirs, including the five-book sequence, "Scenes From the Life of an American Jew." More than half his books were completed after he turned 80.
NEWS
July 31, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN, TIME STAFF WRITER
John Sanford is an authentic hero of American letters. His more than 20 books, though still too infrequently appreciated, are among its treasures. More remarkable yet, the Santa Barbara-based writer, who is now in his 99th year, still is adding to a body of work whose formal bravura and lyric prose are nearly without parallel in contemporary literature. His latest book, "A Palace of Silver," will be published in March by Capra Press. Like so much of his later work, it defies generic boundaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
John Sanford, a prolific but neglected writer who was blacklisted in the 1950s and produced unconventional works that blended the lines between history, fiction and autobiography, has died. He was 98. The author of 24 published books who was often compared to William Carlos Williams and John Dos Passos, Sanford died of an aortic aneurysm Thursday at a hospital near his home in Montecito, said his grandnephew, Jerry Gustafson.
BOOKS
January 26, 2003 | Greg Goldin, Greg Goldin is a writer who contributes to numerous publications, including L.A. Weekly and Los Angeles magazine.
In the autumn of 1978, John Sanford arrived at the studios of radio station KPFK, where I was working, to tend to the recorded reading of his book "View From This Wilderness," the second of what would become his five volume face-off with American literary and historical figures, obscure and well-known. The writing was honed, the choice of words flinty and incendiary.
NEWS
July 31, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN, TIME STAFF WRITER
John Sanford is an authentic hero of American letters. His more than 20 books, though still too infrequently appreciated, are among its treasures. More remarkable yet, the Santa Barbara-based writer, who is now in his 99th year, still is adding to a body of work whose formal bravura and lyric prose are nearly without parallel in contemporary literature. His latest book, "A Palace of Silver," will be published in March by Capra Press. Like so much of his later work, it defies generic boundaries.
NEWS
July 31, 2002
These are the opening paragraphs of John Sanford's forthcoming book, "A Palace of Silver": Near one end of the Santa Barbara beach rises a hill called Bellosgarda, and spreading over its grounds is a cemetery. From the grounds, no part of the city can be seen; the view is of mountains inland and the Channel seaward, an expanse of some twenty miles to a chain of islands lying lavender along the horizon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Sanford began his career as an Army photographer in Vietnam during the war, capturing some of humanity's most disturbing moments on film. But he made his mark as a professional photographer by aiming his lens toward the heavens, creating inspiring images of the cosmos that have been published in books and magazines throughout the world. The 58-year-old Costa Mesa resident has managed to combine his skill in photography and his passion for astronomy into a single career.
BOOKS
October 19, 1997 | ERIC FONER, Eric Foner is DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University
Poet, novelist, screenwriter and law school graduate, John Sanford defies conventional classification. He is a prolific though neglected writer whose 20-odd books include a remarkable series of meditations on the American past. A self-taught historian, Sanford possesses qualities unusual even among professionals: an eye for the telling detail or incident that opens up an entire world of meaning, an ability to plumb the inner thoughts and emotions of figures in the past and a genuine concern for society's outcasts and underdogs.
BOOKS
March 13, 1988 | Elaine Kendall
John Sanford's house, in a bucolic Montecito canyon, is uncluttered by files, notebooks, diaries or outlines. The bookcases are crowded, but there's space on the walls and desk to spare.
BOOKS
December 25, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH
THE VIEW FROM MOUNT MORRIS: A Harlem Boyhood by John Sanford (Barricade Books: $22; 231 pp.). John Sanford, now 90, between 1939 and 1964 published books with Alfred A. Knopf, Harcourt Brace, Doubleday, and W. W. Norton; since 1976 he's published a dozen more books, none with a major publishing house. It's conceivable that these more recent titles had less merit than his earlier work . . . but I doubt it, for if "The View From Mt.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This book is a master class in love, the chronicle of the author's 50 years of marriage to the screenwriter Marguerite Roberts. You could ransack an entire library without learning as much about commitment, mutual respect, delight, devotion and resilience as you'll find in these succinct pages. The story is told in some of the most distinctive prose written in this century, so individual in structure, cadence and vocabulary as to be not only immediately recognizable but virtually inimitable.
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