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John Sayles

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2009 | Josh Getlin
For 40 minutes last month he held them spellbound, reading about America in 1898. John Sayles didn't just give the crowd a taste of his new novel, "Some Time in the Sun" -- he performed a comedy about tabloid newsboys in New York, playing 26 characters with thick, period accents. "WAR!" Sayles boomed in the voice of a 13-year-old newsie thrilled ("Trilled!") that the Spanish-American War had boosted his daily street sales: "Remember the . . . Maine!
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Some jobs - catching fastballs, singing pop songs, dancing en pointe - are a lot easier when you're young. Add to that list directing independent movies, where it's not the physical demands that wear out many filmmakers but the financial stresses. At some point, most indie directors tire of the never-ending hustle for the money to make and release their movies and repair to the more lucrative worlds of television and studio fare. That's what makes the career of John Sayles so remarkable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Some jobs - catching fastballs, singing pop songs, dancing en pointe - are a lot easier when you're young. Add to that list directing independent movies, where it's not the physical demands that wear out many filmmakers but the financial stresses. At some point, most indie directors tire of the never-ending hustle for the money to make and release their movies and repair to the more lucrative worlds of television and studio fare. That's what makes the career of John Sayles so remarkable.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Filmmaker John Sayles will be talking about his new film, "Go for Sisters," in a live chat Friday at noon Pacific time with Times staff writer Mark Olsen. Sayles can answer your questions too; use the hashtag #AskLATimes on Twitter now and during the chat. A two-time Academy Award nominee, for the original screenplay to "Lone Star" in 1996 and "Passion Fish" in 1992, Sayles has long been considered one of the key figures in the development of American independent filmmaking. Writing the screenplays for such films as "Piranha" and "The Howling," Sayles also began making films of his own, beginning with 1979's "Return of the Secaucus Seven.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Strathairn often looks like he's in a state of limbo when acting. Perhaps it's his apprehensive appearance and pensive persona, as though he's quietly hiding some deep, dark secret. Watching him reminds you of Nick Carraway from "The Great Gatsby," or even Clark Kent. It's the way Strathairn conveys those qualities of dutiful sacrifice and pained preoccupation. Yet his physical prowess proves he's no victim either.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
This city's celebrated film festival is usually like a hibernating bear, slow getting started and difficult to rouse from a season's protracted slumber. This year has been different. The gala opening night film, for instance, often has little more than French origins or major names to recommend it: Consider that Sharon Stone and Isabelle Adjani's "Diabolique" was a serious contender this time around.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In his 17th feature, indie stalwart John Sayles sheds welcome light on a long-suppressed episode in American foreign policy. Uneven but ultimately affecting, "Amigo" looks at the Philippine-American War, an often brutal adventure in imperialism at the turn of the last century, through the story of an occupied village. Shot entirely in the Philippines, the film captures the tropical humidity as U.S. troops overtake a remote community and place its leader (Philippine star Joel Torre)
BOOKS
June 2, 1991 | Christine Bell, Bell is the author of "Saint" and "The Perez Family."
All Marta de la Pena needs is wings to fly. She is already half-angel, with eyes that see into men's souls. She is a modern-day Joan of Arc, with a plan, if not to liberate Cuba, at least to let Fidel Castro know that there still are people willing to fight for their lost island. Marta is the central force unifying John Sayles' collection of Cuban dreamers, "Los Gusanos"--the worms, as Castro branded those who fled his revolution. The time is 1981, the place Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | SEAN MITCHELL
Walk into the place where John Sayles and Maggie Renzi live, in a brick row-house apartment across the Hudson River from Manhattan, and the first thing you see on a hot day is Renzi bent over an ironing board getting her clothes ready for a trip to Scotland. When you produce movies in America that cost as little as theirs do, it means, among other things, that you still do your own laundry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
He's played a brooding, chain smoking journalist, a diabolical Hollywood pimp and a high school English teacher who brazenly slept with Tony Soprano's wife. In a 30-year acting career, David Strathairn has been identified with dark, introspective characters who smolder their way through memorable performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2013 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood is turning the clock back Friday to the summer of 1975, when movie audiences were screaming their lungs out over Steven Spielberg's seminal big-fish-in-water thriller "Jaws. " Not only was the film the equivalent of a heart-pounding thrill ride, "Jaws" also became the first summer blockbuster and forever changed the movie business. The Cinematheque's "Jaws & Friends: Movies to Sink Your Teeth Into" celebrates the classic film that put Spielberg on the international map and the countless imitators that followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In his 17th feature, indie stalwart John Sayles sheds welcome light on a long-suppressed episode in American foreign policy. Uneven but ultimately affecting, "Amigo" looks at the Philippine-American War, an often brutal adventure in imperialism at the turn of the last century, through the story of an occupied village. Shot entirely in the Philippines, the film captures the tropical humidity as U.S. troops overtake a remote community and place its leader (Philippine star Joel Torre)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2009 | Josh Getlin
For 40 minutes last month he held them spellbound, reading about America in 1898. John Sayles didn't just give the crowd a taste of his new novel, "Some Time in the Sun" -- he performed a comedy about tabloid newsboys in New York, playing 26 characters with thick, period accents. "WAR!" Sayles boomed in the voice of a 13-year-old newsie thrilled ("Trilled!") that the Spanish-American War had boosted his daily street sales: "Remember the . . . Maine!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
He's played a brooding, chain smoking journalist, a diabolical Hollywood pimp and a high school English teacher who brazenly slept with Tony Soprano's wife. In a 30-year acting career, David Strathairn has been identified with dark, introspective characters who smolder their way through memorable performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
From his home base in New Jersey to Louisiana, Texas, Alaska and Florida, novelist-turned-hyphenated filmmaker John Sayles has crisscrossed the country weaving sprawling stories in such films as "City of Hope," "Passion Fish," "Lone Star," "Limbo" and "Sunshine State." Unique among his peers, Sayles travels his own road dramatizing an Americana streaked with social realism and a touch of the magical.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2007 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
DIRECTOR John Sayles and his partner and producer Maggie Renzi were having a drink in New York City while their new film, "Honeydripper," played at the African Diaspora Film Festival. "Honeydripper," about the arrival of rock 'n' roll in an Alabama blues town in the 1950s, opens Friday in limited release. Let's talk distribution, the most important and the least sexy of topics. Maggie: We're making it sexy! . . . My thing is, they gave up on the audience over 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
From his home base in New Jersey to Louisiana, Texas, Alaska and Florida, novelist-turned-hyphenated filmmaker John Sayles has crisscrossed the country weaving sprawling stories in such films as "City of Hope," "Passion Fish," "Lone Star," "Limbo" and "Sunshine State." Unique among his peers, Sayles travels his own road dramatizing an Americana streaked with social realism and a touch of the magical.
BOOKS
November 1, 1987 | John Boorman, Boorman, director of "Hope and Glory" and "Deliverance," is the author of "The Emerald Forest Diary" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
If you are desperate to make a movie but have no idea how to go about it, rush out and buy this book. It is a primer, a "Dick and Jane" that takes you step by step through the process--from script to editing. John Sayles declares that he wrote it because he wished such a book had been around when he was trying to learn how to make movies. If you already make movies, it will be of only marginal interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Writer-director John Sayles is one of the godfathers of the American independent movement. He's made remarkable pictures like "Matewan," "Eight Men Out" and "Lone Star" that have seamlessly melded dramatic interest and socio-political concerns. "Silver City" is not one of them, though it's not for lack of trying. That's an unhappy conclusion to reach, and not only out of respect for Sayles' previous achievements.
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