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WORLD
May 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The author of a disputed British intelligence dossier on Iraqi weapons of mass destruction that laid out the case for war was chosen to head Britain's MI6 spy agency. Opposition politicians said John Scarlett should not have been appointed while a government inquiry is probing why Iraq did not have the chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs cited as a cause for war. British Prime Minister Tony Blair defended the appointment, saying Scarlett was chosen on merit.
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WORLD
June 17, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Britain's international spy agency has a new chief -- a top U.N. diplomat who had a senior role in talks about Iran's disputed nuclear program. John Sawers will take up his new post in November, the prime minister's office said in a statement. He replaces John Scarlett, whose career has been dogged by concerns over the intelligence used to build the case for the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Scarlett is retiring after five years. Prime Minister Gordon Brown's Downing Street office said Sawers, 53, was rejoining MI6 -- but declined to give details of his previous appointment with the intelligence agency, formally known as the Secret Intelligence Service
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WORLD
June 17, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Britain's international spy agency has a new chief -- a top U.N. diplomat who had a senior role in talks about Iran's disputed nuclear program. John Sawers will take up his new post in November, the prime minister's office said in a statement. He replaces John Scarlett, whose career has been dogged by concerns over the intelligence used to build the case for the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Scarlett is retiring after five years. Prime Minister Gordon Brown's Downing Street office said Sawers, 53, was rejoining MI6 -- but declined to give details of his previous appointment with the intelligence agency, formally known as the Secret Intelligence Service
WORLD
May 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The author of a disputed British intelligence dossier on Iraqi weapons of mass destruction that laid out the case for war was chosen to head Britain's MI6 spy agency. Opposition politicians said John Scarlett should not have been appointed while a government inquiry is probing why Iraq did not have the chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs cited as a cause for war. British Prime Minister Tony Blair defended the appointment, saying Scarlett was chosen on merit.
WORLD
January 13, 2010 | By Henry Chu and Janet Stobart
Britain's role in the war in Iraq is one to be proud of, a defiant Alastair Campbell told the ongoing Iraq Inquiry on Tuesday. During five hours of questioning on the decision to invade Iraq along with the U.S., Campbell, who was Tony Blair's communications director in 2003, put on a robust defense of his boss at the time, insisting that the British prime minister was not President George W. Bush's "poodle." Campbell told the independent panel that Blair had been convinced by intelligence sources that Saddam Hussein's chemical and biological weapons could be unleashed within a 45-minute time frame.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Biotech company Geron Corp. announced Monday that it would cease work on its stem cell programs, citing financial reasons. The Menlo Park, Calif.-based biotech company was a leader in the field and had been conducting a Phase 1 clinical trial of a human embryonic stem cell-based therapy for patients with spinal cord injuries.  Four patients had participated thus far in that effort, which was designed to test the new treatment's safety.  GRNOPC1, as...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1985 | TERRY ATKINSON
There's seldom much agreement among the VideOlympics panel when it comes to rating the latest music videos--and never more so than this month, when I often found myself on one side of the fence, and Richard Cromelin, Dennis Hunt, Connie Johnson, Craig Lee and Chris Willman on the other. Oh well, c'est la video. Most of us could agree, though, that Talking Heads and Prince have once again come up with little gems.
WORLD
July 15, 2004 | Janet Stobart and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
British spy agencies used unreliable sources and exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq, but the government of Prime Minister Tony Blair did not deliberately mislead the public in making the case for war, an investigative commission concluded Wednesday. The 196-page report by Robin Butler, a former head of the civil service, was less critical than a similar U.S. Senate document last week that scolded U.S. spy agencies for erroneously describing Iraq's weapons programs as active and dangerous.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
For years, Geron Corp. had claimed to be in the vanguard among California companies engaged in stem cell research. So it was something of a stunner when it announced Nov. 14 that it was abandoning the stem cell field completely. Geron's shares fell 20% the next day, but that was probably nothing compared with how far spirits must have fallen at the California stem cell agency, which just a few months earlier had made its highest-profile investment ever by awarding Menlo Park-based Geron a $25-million loan to help fund the first human trial of stem cell-based spinal cord therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Randall Emmett has produced 70 movies - more than super-producer Jerry Bruckheimer, more than Paramount Pictures in the last five years, more than he can even remember. Many were low-budget schlock. Some went straight to the DVD shelves. But Emmett has never stopped hustling, calling and yelling at whomever he needs to in order to get that next project made. "He's the Tasmanian devil," says Emmett's longtime producing partner, George Furla. Now Emmett is moving into the big leagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1991 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The ads have got it wrong. Kevin Costner very definitely isn't "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves," and his noticeable awkwardness in that rebel's role underlines the problems this muddled, fitfully effective version of a most durable English legend has in deciding which face it wants to present to the world at large.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2005 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
The average American goes to the movie theater fewer than six times a year, which makes Richard Troncone way, way above average. In his West Los Angeles home, the 54-year-old computer tech keeps a careful list of every film he's seen during the last 40 years. Since 1988, he's watched 2,445 movies, averaging more than 135 films a year -- all of them in a theater.
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