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John Schlesinger

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2003
A limited number of seats are available to the public for a memorial service for director John Schlesinger at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Directors Guild of America Theatre, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. Schlesinger died July 25. Michael York, Lily Tomlin, Melanie Griffith, Michael Apted, Peter Bart, David Hockney and others are scheduled to speak. To attend, call the DGA at (310) 289-5311.
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BOOKS
February 12, 2006 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is a contributing writer to Book Review and a film critic for Time.
----- Conversations With the Great Moviemakers of Hollywood's Golden Age At the American Film Institute Edited with commentaries by George Stevens Jr. Alfred A. Knopf: 738 pp., $35 ----- Conversations With John Schlesinger Ian Buruma Random House: 208 pp., $14.95 paper BASICALLY, movie history is a collection of rumors burnished and rendered pointed and plausible by the passage of time. That is to say, it is an oral history, almost entirely without basis in documented fact.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
John Schlesinger, the British director who first gained acclaim in the 1960s with films such as "Billy Liar" and "Darling" and capped the decade by winning a best director Oscar for "Midnight Cowboy," his first American film, died Friday. He was 77. Schlesinger had suffered a debilitating stroke in December 2000. He had been in and out of Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs over the last 90 days. He was admitted again Monday and was taken off life support Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Two film programs that kick off tonight veer from the sublime to the giddily subversive, keenly illustrating the rich diversity of cinema and of the retrospective format. "A Kind of Loving: The Personal Films of John Schlesinger," at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, highlights some of the late Oscar-winning director's best films. Schlesinger, who died last summer at 77, directed 25 films, TV projects and plays during a 40-plus-year career.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1994 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a man who has spent half his life in the pursuit of making movies, John Schlesinger is surprisingly gloomy about the process. "I don't think, by and large, I have had too many enjoyable films," he sighs. "Not many were without problems." It seems an odd admission. He is known for fluid, visually interesting movies, often packed with intriguing background detail; if anyone makes directing look effortless, it's Schlesinger.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is 73 now, decades removed from his famous films like "Midnight Cowboy," "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" and "Marathon Man," yet Oscar-winning British director John Schlesinger admits he is still unnerved at the prospect of subjecting his latest movie, "The Next Best Thing," to preview test audiences for their post-production critique.
NEWS
July 6, 1986
One of the most important books in 1940s American literature was "The Day of the Locust" by Nathanael West. It was made into a fine film in 1975 by John Schlesinger. The version KCOP showed had 50 minutes hacked senselessly and bore no resemblance whatever to the theatrical film. Paul Dunfee, Fullerton
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | JON MATSUMOTO
"Yanks" (1979), directed by John Schlesinger. 139 minutes. Rated R. Lisa Eichhorn is a young Englishwoman who must choose between her new love--an American soldier (Richard Gere)--and her boyfriend, who is away fighting the Germans. This old-fashioned movie captures with glowing warmth the rapture felt during the initial phases of romance but manages to avoid idealizing the relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1993
Well, Excuse Us Following are some addendum to last Sunday's SNEAKS '93 issue: Sleepless in Seattle, directed by Nora Ephron and starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, will be released this summer by TriStar. The Innocent, with Anthony Hopkins and Isabella Rossellini and directed by John Schlesinger, is due out this fall. Ian McEwan adapted his novel. The information provided for Naked in New York omitted co-writer John Warren. Also, the screenwriter for A Dangerous Woman is Naomi Foner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2003
A limited number of seats are available to the public for a memorial service for director John Schlesinger at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Directors Guild of America Theatre, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. Schlesinger died July 25. Michael York, Lily Tomlin, Melanie Griffith, Michael Apted, Peter Bart, David Hockney and others are scheduled to speak. To attend, call the DGA at (310) 289-5311.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
John Schlesinger, the British director who first gained acclaim in the 1960s with films such as "Billy Liar" and "Darling" and capped the decade by winning a best director Oscar for "Midnight Cowboy," his first American film, died Friday. He was 77. Schlesinger had suffered a debilitating stroke in December 2000. He had been in and out of Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs over the last 90 days. He was admitted again Monday and was taken off life support Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2000 | JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY
Surfing on the crest of the British cinema's New Wave, John Schlesinger's "Billy Liar" arrived here in late 1963, smack between the psychological trauma of John F. Kennedy's assassination and the Beatles' six-string-caliber coup de gra^ce of the entire postwar period. Not the best timing for a satirical comedy, or any comedy, or any film at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Sixty members of the Los Angeles Opera chorus are gathered in a Performing Arts Center rehearsal room for their first go-round of a pub scene in Benjamin Britten's "Peter Grimes." Director John Schlesinger sits Yoda-like on the side. Having survived a triple bypass operation and a host of physical setbacks in the course of the year, the portly, mild-mannered 74-year-old now walks with a cane and strains to make himself heard. "What's the name of that fellow?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000
It is a naive assumption that bad films begin life as bad scripts ("Frailty, Thy Name is Director," by Kenneth Turan, April 9). In postulating about why good directors "choose" weak screenplays, Turan has overlooked an increasingly frequent cause of script-deterioration: the egocentric actor. The original screenplay for "The Next Best Thing," which Turan lashes, was a highly regarded script that several studios wanted to buy; however, the version that John Schlesinger signed on to direct was not the version that made it to the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is 73 now, decades removed from his famous films like "Midnight Cowboy," "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" and "Marathon Man," yet Oscar-winning British director John Schlesinger admits he is still unnerved at the prospect of subjecting his latest movie, "The Next Best Thing," to preview test audiences for their post-production critique.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | JON MATSUMOTO
The film "Yanks" so alluringly captures the quaint spirit of a small English community and the breathtaking beauty of its outlying countryside that after the end credits vanish, you'll want to hop on the next plane to the British Isles. Director John Schlesinger found the perfect backdrop for his moving 1979 drama about American GIs in Britain during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000
It is a naive assumption that bad films begin life as bad scripts ("Frailty, Thy Name is Director," by Kenneth Turan, April 9). In postulating about why good directors "choose" weak screenplays, Turan has overlooked an increasingly frequent cause of script-deterioration: the egocentric actor. The original screenplay for "The Next Best Thing," which Turan lashes, was a highly regarded script that several studios wanted to buy; however, the version that John Schlesinger signed on to direct was not the version that made it to the screen.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
Like men of a certain age who persist in wearing tiny ponytails, GoldenEye (KNBC Sunday at 8 p.m.), the 17th James Bond film, is a middle-aged entity anxious to appear trendy at all costs. A mildly successful attempt at updating a relic, its appeal depends greatly on an audience's willingness to go along for a familiar ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1994 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For a man who has spent half his life in the pursuit of making movies, John Schlesinger is surprisingly gloomy about the process. "I don't think, by and large, I have had too many enjoyable films," he sighs. "Not many were without problems." It seems an odd admission. He is known for fluid, visually interesting movies, often packed with intriguing background detail; if anyone makes directing look effortless, it's Schlesinger.
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