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John Schwarz

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NEWS
June 16, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A Caltech physicist who played a key role in developing an all-encompassing "theory of everything" was named Monday as one of the 32 winners of the 1987 MacArthur Foundation fellowships, which provide a five-year, tax-free stipend. John Schwarz, 45, will receive $280,000 over the five years to spend in any way he sees fit. His fellowship is among four given this year to physicists working in the esoteric field of super-strings, the foundation of the "theory of everything."
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NEWS
November 17, 1999 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It's not every day that a revolution in physics is announced by a ranting and raving guy who gets carried off by two men in white coats. Yet that's more or less what happened to Caltech physicist John Schwarz in the summer of 1984. To be fair, the ravings were a prearranged part of a physics "cabaret" put on as pure entertainment at the Aspen Center for Physics in Colorado.
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NEWS
November 17, 1999 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It's not every day that a revolution in physics is announced by a ranting and raving guy who gets carried off by two men in white coats. Yet that's more or less what happened to Caltech physicist John Schwarz in the summer of 1984. To be fair, the ravings were a prearranged part of a physics "cabaret" put on as pure entertainment at the Aspen Center for Physics in Colorado.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Self-made billionaire John D. MacArthur left an unusual last testament: His fortune was to be given away however the executors saw fit. During his lifetime, the shirt-sleeves individualist ran his insurance empire from a table in a Florida coffee shop and had neither the time nor the inclination to become a munificent donor. "I'm going to do what I do best; I'm going to make the money," he told his lawyer, William Kirby. "When I die, you fellows give it away."
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Self-made billionaire John D. MacArthur left an unusual last testament: His fortune was to be given away however the executors saw fit. During his lifetime, the shirt-sleeves individualist ran his insurance empire from a table in a Florida coffee shop and had neither the time nor the inclination to become a munificent donor. "I'm going to do what I do best; I'm going to make the money," he told his lawyer, William Kirby. "When I die, you fellows give it away."
NEWS
June 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
John McCain's Michigan backers apparently haven't heard him say he has no interest in joining Republican George W. Bush's presidential ticket. In fact, they put in orders for 500 Bush-McCain bumper stickers after McCain's Michigan campaign office announced by e-mail Wednesday that they were available. State Sen. John Schwarz, chairman of McCain's Michigan campaign, said he paid for them himself because he is convinced that having McCain on the ticket will help the GOP win in November.
OPINION
November 21, 1999
Congratulations on a nearly understandable article about the very complex subject of string theory (Nov. 16). So apparently, in addition to the three dimensions of space plus the one of time, there are seven basic strings (types of energy) that, when combined in the millions of combinations possible, make up everything in our universe that we see and don't see. That would explain why there are seven basic notes in the musical universe, seven basic colors in the visual universe, and why seven is considered a sacred number in nearly all the world's major religions.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | From Associated Press
Republican national committeeman Chuck Yob said he will not resign after saying women running for statewide elective office are best suited for secretary of state because "they like that kind of work." Two Republican candidates for Michigan governor, Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus and state Sen. John Schwarz of Battle Creek, called for Yob to step down.
OPINION
October 27, 2013
Re "A false poverty line," Opinion, Oct. 24 John E. Schwarz's Op-Ed article is a welcome focus on the issue of poverty, but his discussion of Mollie Orshansky's poverty line measure is insufficient. (Orshanksy reasoned that because one-third of a family budget is devoted to food, one could use an emergency food budget multiplied by a factor of three to calculate a roughly adequate estimate of poverty.) Schwarz does not sufficiently emphasize that this measure is based on a temporary, emergency budget for food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1986 | DELTHIA RICKS, United Press International
Not long after Albert Einstein published his theory of relativity 71 years ago, physicists began searching for something they call TOE--or Theory of Everything. Now they think they are on the brink of that discovery with a theory called superstrings. The concept seeks to illustrate the interrelationship among the four basic forces of nature--gravity, electromagnetism and the quantum strong and weak forces. These forces are responsible for all things in nature.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A Caltech physicist who played a key role in developing an all-encompassing "theory of everything" was named Monday as one of the 32 winners of the 1987 MacArthur Foundation fellowships, which provide a five-year, tax-free stipend. John Schwarz, 45, will receive $280,000 over the five years to spend in any way he sees fit. His fellowship is among four given this year to physicists working in the esoteric field of super-strings, the foundation of the "theory of everything."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Series B of the Ensemble Studio Theatre's EST/LA Marathon '86--a long name for a series of new one-acts developed at the Studio--is offering a short two-character piece ("Woman Meets Vulture at the L.A. Zoo," written by John Schwarz and directed by Barry Mchlin) and a monologue ("Angel of Mercy," written by Jose Rivera and directed by Linda Callahan).
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michio Kaku must have been the most interesting kid on his block. When he wasn't reading science fiction, or wondering how carp in the Japanese Tea Garden envision the universe, he was building his own "Betatron," an electron accelerator, with the help of very supportive parents. Kaku assembled it on his high school football field with parts scavenged from the electronic warehouses that dotted the Bay Area, where he grew up in the '60s.
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