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NEWS
May 5, 1986 | United Press International
The Supreme Court, acting on the 61st anniversary of the arrest of John Scopes for teaching evolution, agreed today to decide whether public schools can be forced to give equal time to the teaching of "creation science." The court will hear arguments next term in the case brought by the state of Louisiana seeking review of a ruling by the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals that found the law violated the Constitution's requirement of separation of church and state.
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NEWS
March 10, 1994 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County playgoers have several choices before them during the next few weeks, none more strongly recommended than the opportunity to see Ernest Huntley's portrayal of "Clarence Darrow," now in production by Ventura's Plaza Players. It's a one-man presentation, written by David Rintels from the point of view of the veteran attorney and civil libertarian.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While some shows dealing with topical issues age more gracefully than others, there's no denying the continuing timeliness of "Inherit the Wind." The 1955 play was a dramatization of events taking place in Tennessee some 30 years earlier, when Tennessee schoolteacher John Scopes was put on trial for teaching Darwin's theory of evolution in a state filled with devout creationists.
OPINION
April 10, 2012
Among its more dubious claims to fame, Tennessee was the site of the 1925 "Monkey Trial," in which John Scopes was convicted of violating a state law against teaching that "man has descended from a lower order of animals. " Eighty-seven years later, the Tennessee Legislature is itching for an encore. It has sent to Gov. Bill Haslam a bill governing the teaching of "scientific subjects that may cause debate and disputation," including evolution and global warming. The legislation says teachers cannot be prohibited from "helping students understand, analyze, critique and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses of existing scientific theories.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2010 | Susan King
In his Academy Award-nominated 1960 drama, "Inherit the Wind," director Stanley Kramer offered a fictionalized depiction of the famed Scopes Monkey Trial of 1925, in which Tennessee high school instructor John Scopes was tried for violating the state's Butler Act, a law prohibiting the teaching of evolution. Fifty years after its initial release, with activists on the political right and left still bitterly divided over social issues, the film remains sharply relevant, something the Malibu Film Society hopes to underscore with a special anniversary screening and panel discussion Sunday.
NEWS
May 6, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, evoking memories of the Scopes "monkey trial," agreed Monday to decide whether the Constitution allows states to require public schools that teach evolution also to conduct courses on the creation theory of the origin of life. The justices will review in the term beginning next October a controversial Louisiana law that was struck down by a federal appeals court as violating the prohibition against government establishment of religion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1988
When the American Civil Liberties Union celebrated its 40th anniversary in 1960, a distinguished Washingtonian sent his congratulations and commended the organization for "working together" with "the overwhelming majority" of Americans to "combat every threat to . . . sacred principles of freedom, liberty and equal justice under law." That ringing endorsement came not from a card-carrying ACLU member but from one of the century's most admired Republican Presidents, Dwight D. Eisenhower.
BOOKS
January 5, 1986 | David G. Savage, Savage is a Times education writer.
The attorneys from New York had come to the small Southern city to do battle with Christian fundamentalists before a judge and the assembled media. The issue was evolution versus the biblical story of creation, and specifically, whether the state could require the teaching of one version or the other to students in its public schools. The time was December, 1981. In one sense, little had changed since 1925 when the world had focused its attention on a similar trial in Dayton, Tenn.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2012 | By David Zucchino
Discussion of creationism in public school classrooms in Tennessee will now be permitted under a bill that passed the Republican-controlled state Legislature despite opposition from the state's Republican governor. The measure will allow classroom debates over evolution, permitting discussions of creationism alongside evolutionary teachings about the origins of life. Critics say the law, disparagingly called "The Monkey Bill," will plunge Tennessee back to the divisive days of the notorious Scopes "Monkey Trial" in Dayton, Tenn., in 1925.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's the thing about Leslie Nielsen: He is completely serious when it comes to Clarence Darrow. That's right, the silver-haired actor best known for puns and pratfalls in three "Naked Gun" movies, parodies such as "Spy Hard" and Disney's "Mr. Magoo," is playing America's most earnest trial lawyer. In performances of the one-man show "Clarence Darrow" in Santa Barbara and Thousand Oaks this weekend, audiences will get to see Nielsen's more somber side. "He was an unusual man who was totally incapable of not feeling the suffering or the pain that his fellow human beings felt," said Nielsen, a self-described Darrow-phile.
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