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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000
Thanks for your feature on UC Berkeley philosophy professor John Searle ("No Limits Hinder UC Thinker," Dec. 28). People sometimes look on the University of California (and other universities) only as prestigious paths to better income populated by stereotyped ivory-tower professors out of touch with "reality." The article on Searle shows the real reason why UC and other universities of its caliber are important. They offer opportunities for people to spend their lives thinking, developing and arguing about ideas that define us as human beings.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000
Thanks for your feature on UC Berkeley philosophy professor John Searle ("No Limits Hinder UC Thinker," Dec. 28). People sometimes look on the University of California (and other universities) only as prestigious paths to better income populated by stereotyped ivory-tower professors out of touch with "reality." The article on Searle shows the real reason why UC and other universities of its caliber are important. They offer opportunities for people to spend their lives thinking, developing and arguing about ideas that define us as human beings.
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NEWS
December 28, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the photograph that dominates the lobby of Sproul Hall at the University of California, a throng of students marches through Sather Gate, the university's southern entrance. The students carry a banner proclaiming "Free Speech." They are en route to a Board of Regents meeting to demand just that and they are blessed.
NEWS
December 28, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the photograph that dominates the lobby of Sproul Hall at the University of California, a throng of students marches through Sather Gate, the university's southern entrance. The students carry a banner proclaiming "Free Speech." They are en route to a Board of Regents meeting to demand just that and they are blessed.
BOOKS
March 15, 1998 | ROBERT C. BERWICK, Robert C. Berwick is co-director of MIT's Center for Biological and Computational Learning and MIT professor of computer science. His most recent book is "Cartesian Computation."
Questions about the mind, brain and consciousness engage us like no others--as simple as any but not simple-minded, the preoccupation of philosophers and scientists since Plato. Does a pinprick feel the same to you and me? Do we mean the same thing when we talk about the color gray-green? Or about Picasso's gray-green portrait of Dora Maar? If we could wire up your brain in a vat, would you retain your personality, your experiences, your consciousness?
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1991
It seems more than a tad ironic that a major proponent of clear-cut, logical analysis--UC Berkeley's John Searle--finds it opportune to resort to metaphor for his pejorative assessment of deconstruction: "It should be fairly obvious to the careful reader that the emperor has no clothes." Advantage, Derrida. SIMON OSWITCH Ventura
NEWS
November 13, 1985 | Associated Press
A new report suggests that NutraSweet might trigger epilepsy in some susceptible people and recommends that doctors question seizure victims about their consumption of the popular artificial sweetener. In the current issue of the British journal Lancet, Dr. Richard J. Wurtman describes three cases in which persons had their first epileptic seizures after drinking large amounts of soft drinks that contained NutraSweet.
BOOKS
December 12, 2004 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Mind A Brief Introduction John R. Searle Oxford University Press: 326 pp., $26 In this succinct, comprehensive introduction to the philosophy of mind, John Searle leads us through the history of that thorny question: What is the mind and how is it distinct from the body? He begins with Descartes' explorations of the mental versus the physical, known in philosophical circles as "dualism." Searle reasons that this split is unnecessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Facing a backlash from scholars worldwide, UC Irvine says it will drop a lawsuit against the widow and children of professor and philosopher Jacques Derrida, the acclaimed founder of the intellectual movement called deconstruction. Instead, UCI officials said they had resumed negotiations with Derrida's family over control of his groundbreaking scholarly work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1994 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's hard to remember there was a time when the free-spirited University of California, Berkeley banned political activity on campus. It's easy to forget that, before student protests of the 1960s and '70s culminated in sometimes violent denunciations of the Vietnam War, young people in dresses and ties staged a sit-in, got arrested and made a powerful institution change its mind.
BOOKS
March 15, 1998 | ROBERT C. BERWICK, Robert C. Berwick is co-director of MIT's Center for Biological and Computational Learning and MIT professor of computer science. His most recent book is "Cartesian Computation."
Questions about the mind, brain and consciousness engage us like no others--as simple as any but not simple-minded, the preoccupation of philosophers and scientists since Plato. Does a pinprick feel the same to you and me? Do we mean the same thing when we talk about the color gray-green? Or about Picasso's gray-green portrait of Dora Maar? If we could wire up your brain in a vat, would you retain your personality, your experiences, your consciousness?
BUSINESS
October 31, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
For now, you won't find any French deconstructionists working at the new IBM/Apple joint venture. Sony, Matsushita and NEC--who have collectively spent billions of yen exploring every facet of multimedia software design--have yet to hire a single phenomonologist. But just wait a year or two. Increasingly, the most exciting areas in software research--virtual reality, artificial life and artificial intelligence--are being shaped as much by metaphysics as by silicon physics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Gunther S. Stent, a UC Berkeley molecular biologist who was a member of the key postwar group of scientists who solved the basic mysteries of the gene and how DNA functions, died June 12 at a retirement home in Haverford, Pa. He was 84 and died from a massive staph infection that he had been fighting for several months.
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