Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Sebastian
IN THE NEWS

John Sebastian

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
John Sebastian, that old softy, is back with his first album in 17 years. But the mature Sebastian is not here to reassure his audience with sentimental, nostalgic, warm fuzzies. While his characteristic warmth still radiates in his grainy voice, folksy harmonica playing and surprisingly adept guitar work, it's frequently a warmth summoned to fight off the chill of social decline and inner hurt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Steve Appleford
Big things happened for Arlo Guthrie in '69. That was the year he got married, bought his farm in western Massachusetts and starred in "Alice's Restaurant," a Hollywood movie based on his popular talkin' blues anthem. And 40 years ago this week, the folk singer also landed at Yasgur's Farm, facing a crowd of nearly half a million at the Woodstock Music & Art Fair. He still hears about that one.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Sebastian didn't have to be so nice, but the fans who turned out for his warm, witty, eminently companionable show at the Coach House on Friday weren't about to complain. Not that Sebastian can afford to be arrogant. At 49, he still looks boyish, but his voice hasn't aged well. The brightness and verve that registered in his days as the Lovin' Spoonful's front man (now more than a quarter century in the past) are long gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Sebastian didn't have to be so nice, but the fans who turned out for his warm, witty, eminently companionable show at the Coach House on Friday weren't about to complain. Not that Sebastian can afford to be arrogant. At 49, he still looks boyish, but his voice hasn't aged well. The brightness and verve that registered in his days as the Lovin' Spoonful's front man (now more than a quarter century in the past) are long gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like another fellow who lived in the Catskills, Rip van Winkle, John Sebastian knows what it means to be away for a long time. Until his new album, "Tar Beach," came out in February, the former singer and main songwriter of the Lovin' Spoonful had gone 17 years without releasing a record. In Washington Irving's tale, Rip indulged in an evening of bowling and brews with a gang of dwarfs, tried to sleep it off and woke up 20 years later to find everything changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
In the mid-'60s, John Sebastian was one of a very select group of songwriters--including also John Lennon, Ray Davies and Brian Wilson--for whom the term genius didn't seem just a publicist's wild notion. Beginning with the brilliant, still-evocative "Do You Believe in Magic," his Lovin' Spoonful racked up seven consecutive Top 10 hits, including the No. 1 "Summer in the City."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
As the camera pans through a marble room, a statue of a flute player, carved from the same beige marble, sways in time to his own music. As if fulfilling King Midas' dream, the flutist and the other statues in the room turn to gold, glittering in the light. Suddenly, a white ball appears and fills the screen with the familiar brush-stroke logo of The Wave, KTWV-FM (94.7).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Steve Appleford
Big things happened for Arlo Guthrie in '69. That was the year he got married, bought his farm in western Massachusetts and starred in "Alice's Restaurant," a Hollywood movie based on his popular talkin' blues anthem. And 40 years ago this week, the folk singer also landed at Yasgur's Farm, facing a crowd of nearly half a million at the Woodstock Music & Art Fair. He still hears about that one.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Music to Lunch By: John Sebastian, former vocalist and songwriter of the Lovin' Spoonful, will perform during a free hourlong lunchtime concert at noon today at the plaza of the Music Center. The music making is part of radio station KLSX-FM's "Summer of Love" concert series.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Former Lovin' Spoonful member John Sebastian is planning to join singer-songwriter Laura Nyro next month for a benefit to save dolphins. The Aug. 1 concert will help the Dolphin Project, a Florida environmental group. The group is working to eliminate abuse of dolphins in captivity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like another fellow who lived in the Catskills, Rip van Winkle, John Sebastian knows what it means to be away for a long time. Until his new album, "Tar Beach," came out in February, the former singer and main songwriter of the Lovin' Spoonful had gone 17 years without releasing a record. In Washington Irving's tale, Rip indulged in an evening of bowling and brews with a gang of dwarfs, tried to sleep it off and woke up 20 years later to find everything changed.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
John Sebastian, that old softy, is back with his first album in 17 years. But the mature Sebastian is not here to reassure his audience with sentimental, nostalgic, warm fuzzies. While his characteristic warmth still radiates in his grainy voice, folksy harmonica playing and surprisingly adept guitar work, it's frequently a warmth summoned to fight off the chill of social decline and inner hurt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
In the mid-'60s, John Sebastian was one of a very select group of songwriters--including also John Lennon, Ray Davies and Brian Wilson--for whom the term genius didn't seem just a publicist's wild notion. Beginning with the brilliant, still-evocative "Do You Believe in Magic," his Lovin' Spoonful racked up seven consecutive Top 10 hits, including the No. 1 "Summer in the City."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989
Perhaps this seems to be "Jeopardy"-like trivial, but for 20 years I have wondered whatever became of the "far out" kid John B. Sebastian sang to--the child born at the festival? Does anybody know? JAN B. MILLARD Riverside
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Folk singer Richie Havens, whose up-tempo rendition of George Harrison's "Here Comes the Sun" was a musical centerpiece of the Woodstock festival 20 years ago, reportedly hopes to do a live reunion festival in Moscow that would feature such acts as John Sebastian (formerly of the Lovin' Spoonful), Joe Cocker and the newly risen Jefferson Airplane. Havens' production company would produce the concert special for MTV Networks, which operates the MTV and VH-1 all-music cable services.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|