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John Seely Brown

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BUSINESS
January 24, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Unlike the Chicken Littles of research and development, Xerox's John Seely Brown doesn't waste time clucking about research budgets and government consortia. Instead, he argues that America's corporate R&D establishment needs a radically new mission, one that recognizes that breakthrough innovations aren't enough anymore.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Unlike the Chicken Littles of research and development, Xerox's John Seely Brown doesn't waste time clucking about research budgets and government consortia. Instead, he argues that America's corporate R&D establishment needs a radically new mission, one that recognizes that breakthrough innovations aren't enough anymore.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 2000
Claudia G. Walker has been named vice president of Safeco Select Insurance Services in Santa Ana. Walker, who joined Safeco in 1999, is the company's human resources manager. Before that, she was director of human resources at Sedgwick James in Irvine. * Tom Hinrichs has been added to the advisory board of Commonwealth Energy Corp. in Tustin. He is president of Pacific Energy Consultants Inc. in Escondido. * Carrie Carter has been named public relations coordinator at Strahan Advertising Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2004 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
George E. Pake, a physicist who helped found the research lab that gave birth to the first personal computer and other tools of the digital age, has died. He was 79. Pake died March 4 of heart failure at his Tucson home. Pake's broad career as a university physics professor, nuclear scientist and research director earned him a National Medal of Science in 1987. In 1970, Pake helped establish Xerox Corp.'
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By François Bar and John Seely Brown, guest bloggers
A remarkable transformation is taking place in the heart of Los Angeles. Over the last 10 years, downtown L.A. became vibrant as it built ties to the south, reaching USC and Exposition Park. From the Walt Disney Concert Hall to the California Science Center, a dynamic innovation corridor is taking shape around Figueroa Street. But the most dramatic change will only come once Figueroa is reinvented to facilitate the flow of people and break down fences. Innovation thrives on clusters: interconnected businesses, creativity across sectors and fluid jobs.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
As Wordsworth noted, "The child is father of the man." So what books and toys from childhood influenced America's top scientists and technologists to go into their chosen fields? Did any of those holiday gifts and books really matter?
BUSINESS
August 13, 1992 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
If Xerox is smart, lucky--and extremely persuasive--this newspaper could turn into the cheapest, most cost-effective computer interface you can carry. Simply pencil in a couple of boxes, pop the desired page into a fax machine, and send any story, graphic or stock quotes you'd like into the appropriate file of your personal computer.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER
In Silicon Valley, technological breakthroughs sometimes seem to arise spontaneously, a kind of magic. Actually, nearly all the most important developments start as someone's deep thoughts. When Mark Weiser, chief technologist at Xerox Corp.'s Palo Alto Research Center, passed away last week, taken by cancer at age 46, the world of technology lost one of the most thoughtful in its ranks. Weiser is considered the father of "ubiquitous computing."
BUSINESS
November 19, 1992 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
The numbers don't lie: American corporate research and development spending continues to drop. You can bet that General Motors, which now spends more than $5 billion a year on R&D, will be spending $4 billion annually within three years. International Business Machines invests about $4 billion annually in its high-tech research. Expect that number to drop by $500 million by the end of 1996.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
For now, you won't find any French deconstructionists working at the new IBM/Apple joint venture. Sony, Matsushita and NEC--who have collectively spent billions of yen exploring every facet of multimedia software design--have yet to hire a single phenomonologist. But just wait a year or two. Increasingly, the most exciting areas in software research--virtual reality, artificial life and artificial intelligence--are being shaped as much by metaphysics as by silicon physics.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Pop Quiz/Short Essay (50 points): Which individual has had the greatest positive impact on the quality of American education in this century? John Dewey? The sentimental choice but not a contender. Columbia University's Nicholas Murray Butler, Harvard University's James Bryant Conant or the University of Chicago's Robert Hutchins? Giants of their time, for sure, but their influence today is but a nostalgic echo. Joan Ganz Cooney of "Sesame Street"? Maybe Captain Kangaroo? Just kidding.
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