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BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Keating Jr., owner of the scandal-plagued Lincoln Savings & Loan of Irvine, predicted Sunday that the federal bailout of the nation's insolvent S&Ls ultimately will cost more than $500 billion, not the $300 billion now generally accepted. Keating also denied any wrongdoing in making $1.3 million in campaign contributions and other donations to Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other U.S.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John McCain, once one of Charles H. Keating Jr.'s good friends, said Friday that he rejected Keating's request nearly five years ago to act as a negotiator in resolving the long and bitter dispute between thrift regulators and Keating's Lincoln Savings & Loan.
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NEWS
November 18, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Charles H. Keating Jr. said Saturday they have formally asked the Senate Ethics Committee to grant the embattled savings and loan owner immunity from prosecution in exchange for his testimony about the "Keating Five" scandal. In letters to the committee's special counsel, a lawyer representing Keating said that "neither the American public nor the committee can know the whole story" about the scandal without hearing his client's testimony.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
'Keating Five' Senator to Testify: Sen. John S. McCain (R-Ariz.) will be allowed to testify at the securities fraud trial of Charles H. Keating Jr., the judge presiding over the criminal trial ruled. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito said McCain's testimony about a meeting he had with Keating in late March, 1987, was relevant to show an attempt, albeit unsuccessful, to manipulate regulators who were examining Keating's Lincoln S&L, based in Irvine. McCain is expected to testify Oct.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Senate Ethics Committee on Tuesday set public hearings Nov. 15 on ties between savings and loan magnate Charles H. Keating Jr. and five senators. In deciding on the hearings, the panel reportedly rejected a recommendation by special counsel Robert S. Bennett to launch a full-scale inquiry into the actions of Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and two of his Democratic colleagues and to drop charges against two others, one a Democrat and the other a Republican.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the Senate Ethics Committee denied Thursday that the committee has ever considered granting limited immunity from prosecution to former savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr. to obtain testimony about his links to five senators. With public hearings set for next month in the politically charged case, the committee issued a statement saying it "has at no time discussed or considered granting immunity" to the former head of Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn. of Irvine, Calif.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | From the Washington Post
The Senate Ethics Committee on Friday delayed a decision on five senators under investigation for their ties to former savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr., prompting a protest from Sen. Trent Lott (R-Miss.) that the five are being victimized by the panel's "fear of acting." Lott, a committee member, described himself as "furious" about what he said was the committee's inability to decide how to proceed.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Ethics Committee is considering giving former thrift executive Charles H. Keating Jr. limited immunity in exchange for testimony about his ties to five senators, sources on the committee said Wednesday. Such action could bolster the committee's case against Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and four others who tried to help the former owner of Lincoln Savings & Loan Assn. solve his problems with federal thrift regulators.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
The special counsel to the Senate Ethics Committee has recommended that no action be taken against Sens. John Glenn (D-Ohio) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) in an S&L case, a congressional source disclosed Friday night. The counsel recommended that the committee proceed with an investigation of the three other senators who intervened with regulators on behalf of Arizona savings and loan operator Charles H. Keating Jr., the source said. The other senators from the "Keating Five" group are Donald W.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston, in an impassioned message to the Senate Ethics Committee, said Tuesday that it would be "monumentally unfair" to punish him or his four colleagues for their dealings with savings and loan executive Charles Keating Jr. "None of us did anything unethical," said Cranston's statement, which was read to the committee by one of his attorneys just before the panel ended its formal consideration of evidence.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. John McCain, one of the so-called Keating Five, has been asked to testify by the prosecution in the state securities fraud trial of Charles H. Keating Jr. The possibility that the Arizona Republican might take the stand came to light Friday after Robin S. Symes, a former Lincoln Savings & Loan chairman and a key prosecution witness, concluded three days of testimony. The cross-examination of Symes on Friday raised doubts about some key statements he made in the previous two days. Dist.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Ethics Committee is likely to recommend that Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) be disciplined by the full Senate for his actions on behalf of former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr., knowledgeable sources said Monday. The sources indicated that they expect Cranston to face something short of expulsion but more serious than a letter of reprimand--probably censure, denouncement or some step that would condemn his actions without forcing him from office.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate Ethics Committee finished a grueling 26 days of hearings Wednesday, special counsel Robert S. Bennett accused five senators of acting like "an 800-pound gorilla" when they intervened with regulators on behalf of thrift owner Charles H. Keating Jr. Bennett brushed aside assertions by lawyers for the senators that they were only doing their duty as elected officials in going to bat for Keating, a combative savings and loan operator who contributed $1.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston, in an impassioned message to the Senate Ethics Committee, said Tuesday that it would be "monumentally unfair" to punish him or his four colleagues for their dealings with savings and loan executive Charles Keating Jr. "None of us did anything unethical," said Cranston's statement, which was read to the committee by one of his attorneys just before the panel ended its formal consideration of evidence.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz). came under heavy questioning Friday before the Senate Ethics Committee about a three-year delay in repaying $13,000 in travel costs to the firm controlled by savings and loan kingpin Charles H. Keating Jr. McCain said he didn't realize he had paid only $2,000 of the total $15,433 in expenses for flights on planes and helicopters on various trips to join Keating at a Bahamas estate for swimming, snorkeling and fishing.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii), making an unusual appearance as a character witness Monday, said that the "Keating Five" are guilty only of fighting for a constituent with "vigor and aggressiveness." He told the Ethics Committee: "The political realities of life dictate (that) whatever we do should please our constituents." If Lincoln Savings & Loan had not failed, "these men would be heroes to their constituents . . . . Today, they are attacked because the endeavor failed."
BUSINESS
October 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
'Keating Five' Senator to Testify: Sen. John S. McCain (R-Ariz.) will be allowed to testify at the securities fraud trial of Charles H. Keating Jr., the judge presiding over the criminal trial ruled. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito said McCain's testimony about a meeting he had with Keating in late March, 1987, was relevant to show an attempt, albeit unsuccessful, to manipulate regulators who were examining Keating's Lincoln S&L, based in Irvine. McCain is expected to testify Oct.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John McCain, once one of Charles H. Keating Jr.'s good friends, said Friday that he rejected Keating's request nearly five years ago to act as a negotiator in resolving the long and bitter dispute between thrift regulators and Keating's Lincoln Savings & Loan.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) has told the Senate Ethics Committee that even though he once was at the beck and call of Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr., he deeply regrets ever meeting the controversial thrift executive. "Personally and politically, I wish to God I'd never heard of Charles Keating," Cranston declared during a closed-door deposition last May. A transcript of the deposition was released Friday during hearings into the "Keating Five" scandal.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) contends that Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr., a conservative Republican, contributed nearly $1 million to his political activities because the thrift executive is a "patriot" who believes in democracy, according to a Senate Ethics Committee deposition released Thursday.
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