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NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
They are the most traditional-looking Indians in Santa Barbara County. Many wear their hair in braids and dress in full Indian regalia at public hearings. Some have assumed names such as White Bear and Mushu. They have more political power, county officials say, and have made more money monitoring construction sites for Chumash artifacts than any other Indian group in the area.
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NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
They are the most traditional-looking Indians in Santa Barbara County. Many wear their hair in braids and dress in full Indian regalia at public hearings. Some have assumed names such as White Bear and Mushu. They have more political power, county officials say, and have made more money monitoring construction sites for Chumash artifacts than any other Indian group in the area.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | JANE HULSE and SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just before midnight on the chilly evening of March 12, 1928, the new St. Francis Dam collapsed, unleashing a monstrous wall of water that roared down the Santa Clara River Valley. At least 450 people died. Santa Paula, Fillmore, Piru and Castaic reeled from the disaster, which took about as many lives as the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire but captured far less attention. That will change soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1986 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Three Ventura County Indian groups are fighting a legal battle over the bones of their ancestors discovered in a flood control channel, with one side accusing the other of compromising ancient religious beliefs in exchange for a potentially lucrative county contract. A federal judge is expected to decide today whether to suspend a controversial plan to remove Chumash Indian remains from the flood control channel near Point Mugu and rebury them several miles away in a Thousand Oaks park.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just before midnight on the chilly evening of March 12, 1928, the new St. Francis Dam collapsed, unleashing a monstrous wall of water that roared down the Santa Clara River Valley. At least 450 people died. Santa Paula, Fillmore, Piru and Castaic reeled from the disaster, which took about as many lives as the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire but captured far less attention. That will change soon.
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